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Build a Strong Technology Foundation for Customer Experience Management

Design an end-to-end technology strategy to drive sales revenue, enhance marketing effectiveness, and create compelling experiences for your customers.

  • Technology is a fundamental enabler of an organization’s customer experience management (CXM) strategy. However, many IT departments fail to take a systematic approach when building a portfolio of applications for supporting marketing, sales, and customer service functions.
  • The result is a costly, ineffective, and piecemeal approach to CXM application deployment (including high-profile applications like CRM).

Our Advice

Critical Insight

  • IT must work in lockstep with their counterparts in marketing, sales, and customer service to define a unified vision and strategic requirements for enabling a strong CXM program.
  • To deploy applications that specifically align with the needs of the organization’s customers, IT leaders must work with the business to define and understand customer personas and common interaction scenarios. CXM applications are mission critical and failing to link them to customer needs can have a detrimental effect on customer satisfaction and ultimately, revenue.
  • IT must act as a valued partner to the business in creating a portfolio of CXM applications that are cost effective.
  • Organizations should create a repeatable framework for CXM application deployment that addresses critical issues, including the integration ecosystem, customer data quality, dashboards and analytics, and end-user adoption.

Impact and Result

  • Establish strong application alignment to strategic requirements for CXM that is based on concrete customer personas.
  • Improve underlying business metrics across marketing, sales, and service, including customer acquisition, retention, and satisfaction metrics.
  • Better align IT with customer experience needs.

Build a Strong Technology Foundation for Customer Experience Management Research & Tools

Start here – read the Executive Brief

Read our concise Executive Brief to find out why you should build a strong technology foundation for CXM, review Info-Tech’s methodology, and understand the four ways we can support you in completing this project.

2. Create the framework

Identify drivers and objectives for CXM using a persona-driven approach and deploy the right applications to meet those objectives.


Member Testimonials

After each Info-Tech experience, we ask our members to quantify the real-time savings, monetary impact, and project improvements our research helped them achieve. See our top member experiences for this blueprint and what our clients have to say.

8.9/10


Overall Impact

$305,114


Average $ Saved

35


Average Days Saved

Client

Experience

Impact

$ Saved

Days Saved

Werner Co.

Guided Implementation

7/10

N/A

5

Republic Services Procurement, Inc.

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

N/A

Owens Corning

Guided Implementation

8/10

$11,159

2

Horizon Power

Guided Implementation

8/10

$9,299

5

Fusion Superplex

Guided Implementation

10/10

$200K

120

AgriMarchй

Guided Implementation

8/10

$25,000

10

Government of Yukon

Workshop

6/10

$27,500

4

American Chemical Society

Workshop

10/10

$123K

20


Workshop: Build a Strong Technology Foundation for Customer Experience Management

Workshops offer an easy way to accelerate your project. If you are unable to do the project yourself, and a Guided Implementation isn't enough, we offer low-cost delivery of our project workshops. We take you through every phase of your project and ensure that you have a roadmap in place to complete your project successfully.

Module 1: Create the Vision for CXM Technology Enablement

The Purpose

  • Establish a consistent vision across IT, marketing, sales, and customer service for CXM technology enablement.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • A clear understanding of key business and technology drivers for CXM.

Activities

Outputs

1.1

CXM fireside chat

1.2

CXM business drivers

1.3

CXM vision statement

  • CXM vision statement
1.4

Project structure

  • CXM project charter

Module 2: Conduct the Environmental Scan and Internal Review

The Purpose

  • Create a set of strategic requirements for CXM based on a thorough external market scan and internal capabilities assessment.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • Well-defined technology requirements based on rigorous, multi-faceted analysis.

Activities

Outputs

2.1

PEST analysis

2.2

Competitive analysis

2.3

Market and trend analysis

  • Completed external analysis
  • Strategic requirements (from external analysis)
2.4

SWOT analysis

2.5

VRIO analysis

  • Completed internal review
2.6

Channel map

  • Channel interaction map

Module 3: Build Customer Personas and Scenarios

The Purpose

  • Augment strategic requirements through customer persona and scenario development.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • Functional requirements aligned to supporting steps in customer interaction scenarios.

Activities

Outputs

3.1

Persona development

3.2

Scenario development

  • Personas and scenarios
3.3

Requirements definition for CXM

  • Strategic requirements (based on personas)

Module 4: Create the CXM Application Portfolio

The Purpose

  • Using the requirements identified in the preceding modules, build a future-state application inventory for CXM.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • A cohesive, rationalized portfolio of customer interaction applications that aligns with identified requirements and allows investment (or rationalization) decisions to be made.

Activities

Outputs

4.1

Build business process maps

  • Business process maps
4.2

Review application satisfaction

  • Application satisfaction diagnostic
4.3

Create the CXM application portfolio

4.4

Prioritize applications

  • Prioritized CXM application portfolio

Module 5: Review Best Practices and Confirm Initiatives

The Purpose

  • Establish repeatable best practices for CXM applications in areas such as data management and end-user adoption.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • Best practices for rollout of new CXM applications.
  • A prioritized initiatives roadmap.

Activities

Outputs

5.1

Create data integration map

  • Integration map for CXM
5.2

Define adoption best practices

  • End-user adoption plan
5.3

Build initiatives roadmap

5.4

Confirm initiatives roadmap

  • Initiatives roadmap

Build a Strong Technology Foundation for Customer Experience Management

Design an end-to-end technology strategy to enhance marketing effectiveness, drive sales, and create compelling customer service experiences.

ANALYST PERSPECTIVE

Technology is the catalyst to create – and keep! – your customers.

"Customers want to interact with your organization on their own terms, and in the channels of their choice (including social media, mobile applications, and connected devices). Regardless of your industry, your customers expect a frictionless experience across the customer lifecycle. They desire personalized and well-targeted marketing messages, straightforward transactions, and effortless service. Research shows that customers value – and will pay more for! – well-designed experiences.

Strong technology enablement is critical for creating customer experiences that drive revenue. However, most organizations struggle with creating a cohesive technology strategy for customer experience management (CXM). IT leaders need to take a proactive approach to developing a strong portfolio of customer interaction applications that are in lockstep with the needs of their marketing, sales, and customer service teams. It is critical to incorporate the voice of the customer into this strategy.

When developing a technology strategy for CXM, don’t just “pave the cow path,” but instead move the needle forward by providing capabilities for customer intelligence, omnichannel interactions, and predictive analytics. This blueprint will help you build an integrated CXM technology roadmap that drives top-line revenue while rationalizing application spend."

Ben Dickie

Research Director, Customer Experience Strategy

Info-Tech Research Group

Framing the CXM project

This Research Is Designed For:

  • IT leaders who are responsible for crafting a technology strategy for customer experience management (CXM).
  • Applications managers who are involved with the selection and implementation of critical customer-centric applications, such as CRM platforms, marketing automation tools, customer intelligence suites, and customer service solutions.

This Research Will Help You:

  • Clearly link your technology-enablement strategy for CXM to strategic business requirements and customer personas.
  • Build a rationalized portfolio of enterprise applications that will support customer interaction objectives.
  • Adopt standard operating procedures for CXM application deployment that address issues such as end-user adoption and data quality.

This Research Will Also Assist:

  • Business leaders in marketing, sales, and customer service who want to deepen their understanding of CXM technologies, and apply best practices for using these technologies to drive competitive advantage.
  • Marketing, sales, and customer service managers involved with defining requirements and rolling out CXM applications.

This Research Will Help Them:

  • Work hand-in-hand with counterparts in IT to deploy high-value business applications that will improve core customer-facing metrics.
  • Understand the changing CXM landscape and use the art of the possible to transform the internal technology ecosystem and drive meaningful customer experiences.

Executive summary

Situation

  • Customer expectations for personalization, channel preferences, and speed-to-resolution are at an all-time high.
  • Your customers are willing to pay more for high-value experiences, and having a strong customer CXM strategy is a proven path to creating sustainable value for the organization.

Complication

  • Technology is a fundamental enabler of an organization’s CXM strategy. However, many IT departments fail to take a systematic approach to building a portfolio of applications to support Marketing, Sales, and Customer Service.
  • The result is a costly, ineffective, and piecemeal approach to CXM application deployment (including high profile applications like CRM).

Resolution

  • IT must work in lockstep with their counterparts in marketing, sales, and customer service to define a unified vision, strategic requirements and roadmap for enabling strong customer experience capabilities.
  • In order to deploy applications that don’t simply follow previously established patterns but are aligned with the specific needs of the organization’s customers, IT leaders must work with the business to define and understand customer personas and common interaction scenarios. CXM applications are mission critical and failing to link them to customer needs can have a detrimental effect on customer satisfaction – and ultimately revenue.
  • IT must act as a valued partner to the business in creating a portfolio of CXM applications that are cost effective.
  • Organizations should create a repeatable framework for CXM application deployment that addresses critical issues, including the integration ecosystem, customer data quality, dashboards and analytics, and end-user adoption.

Info-Tech Insight

  1. IT can’t hide behind the firewall. IT must understand the organization’s customers to properly support marketing, sales, and service efforts.
  2. IT – or Marketing – must not build the CXM strategy in a vacuum if they want to achieve a holistic, consistent, and seamless customer experience.
  3. IT must get ahead of shadow IT. To be seen as an innovator within the business, IT must be a leading enabler in building a rationalized and integrated CXM application portfolio.

Guide to frequently used acronyms

CXM - Customer Experience Management

CX - Customer Experience

CRM - Customer Relationship Management

CSM - Customer Service Management

MMS - Marketing Management System

SMMP - Social Media Management Platform

RFP - Request for Proposal

SaaS - Software as a Service

Customers’ expectations are on the rise: meet them!

Today’s consumers expect speed, convenience, and tailored experiences at every stage of the customer lifecycle. Successful organizations strive to support these expectations.

67% of end consumers will pay more for a world-class customer experience. 74% of business buyers will pay more for strong B2B experiences. (Salesforce, 2018)

5 CORE CUSTOMER EXPECTATIONS

  1. More personalization
  2. More product options
  3. Constant contact
  4. Listen closely, respond quickly
  5. Give front-liners more control

(Customer Experience Insight, 2016)

Customers expect to interact with organizations through the channels of their choice. Now more than ever, you must enable your organization to provide tailored customer experiences.

Realize measurable value by enabling CXM

Providing a seamless customer experience increases the likelihood of cross-sell and up-sell opportunities and boosts customer loyalty and retention. IT can contribute to driving revenue and decreasing costs by providing the business with the right set of tools, applications, and technical support.

Contribute to the bottom line

Cross-sell, up-sell, and drive customer acquisition.

67% of consumers are willing to pay more for an upgraded experience. (Salesforce, 2018)

80%: The margin by which CX leaders outperformer laggards in the S&P 500.(Qualtrics, 2017)

59% of customers say tailored engagement based on past interactions is very important to winning their business. (Salesforce, 2018)

Enable cost savings

Focus on customer retention as well as acquisition.

It is 6-7x more costly to attract a new customer than it is to retain an existing customer. (Salesforce Blog, 2019)

A 5% increase in customer retention has been found to increase profits by 25% to 95%. (Bain & Company, n.d.)

Strategic CXM is gaining traction with your competition

Organizations are prioritizing CXM capabilities (and associated technologies) as a strategic investment. Keep pace with the competition and gain a competitive advantage by creating a cohesive strategy that uses best practices to integrate marketing, sales, and customer support functions.

87% of customers share great experiences they’ve had with a company. (Zendesk, n.d.)

61% of organizations are investing in CXM. (CX Network, 2015)

53% of organizations believe CXM provides a competitive advantage. (Harvard Business Review, 2014)

Top Investment Priorities for Customer Experience

  1. Voice of the Customer
  2. Customer Insight Generation
  3. Customer Experience Governance
  4. Customer Journey Mapping
  5. Online Customer Experience
  6. Experience Personalization
  7. Emotional Engagement
  8. Multi-Channel Integration/Omnichannel
  9. Quality & Customer Satisfaction Management
  10. Customer/Channel Loyalty & Rewards Programs

(CX Network 2015)

Omnichannel is the way of the future: don’t be left behind

Get ahead of the competition by doing omnichannel right. Devise a CXM strategy that allows you to create and maintain a consistent, seamless customer experience by optimizing operations within an omnichannel framework. Customers want to interact with you on their own terms, and it falls to IT to ensure that applications are in place to support and manage a wide range of interaction channels.

Omnichannel is a “multi-channel approach to sales that seeks to provide the customer with a seamless transactional experience whether the customer is shopping online from a desktop or mobile device, by telephone, or in a bricks and mortar store.” (TechTarget, 2014)

97% of companies say that they are investing in omnichannel. (Huffington Post, 2015)

23% of companies are doing omnichannel well.

CXM applications drive effective multi-channel customer interactions across marketing, sales, and customer service

The success of your CXM strategy depends on the effective interaction of various marketing, sales, and customer support functions. To deliver on customer experience, organizations need to take a customer-centric approach to operations.

From an application perspective, a CRM platform generally serves as the unifying repository of customer information, supported by adjacent solutions as warranted by your CXM objectives.

CXM ECOSYSTEM

Customer Relationship Management Platform

  • Web Experience Management Platform
  • E-Commerce & Point of Sale Solutions
  • Social Media Management Platform
  • Customer Intelligence Platform
  • Customer Service Management Tools
  • Marketing Management Suite

Application spotlight: Customer experience platforms

Description

CXM solutions are a broad range of tools that provide comprehensive feature sets for supporting customer interaction processes. These suites supplant more basic applications for customer interaction management. Popular solutions that fall under the umbrella of CXM include CRM suites, marketing automation tools, and customer service applications.

Features and Capabilities

  • Manage sales pipelines, provide quotes, and track client deliverables.
  • View all opportunities organized by their current stage in the sales process.
  • View all interactions that have occurred between employees and the customer, including purchase order history.
  • Manage outbound marketing campaigns via multiple channels (email, phone, social, mobile).
  • Build visual workflows with automated trigger points and business rules engine.
  • Generate in-depth customer insights, audience segmentation, predictive analytics, and contextual analytics.
  • Provide case management, ticketing, and escalation capabilities for customer service.

Highlighted Vendors

Microsoft Dynamics

Adobe

Marketo

sprinklr

Salesforce

SugarCRM

Application spotlight: Customer experience platforms

Key Trends

  • CXM applications have decreased their focus on departmental silos to make it easier to share information across the organization as departments demand more data.
  • Vendors are developing deeper support of newer channels for customer interaction. This includes providing support for social media channels, native mobile applications, and SMS or text-based services like WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger.
  • Predictive campaigns and channel blending are becoming more feasible as vendors integrate machine learning and artificial intelligence into their applications.
  • Content blocks are being placed on top of scripting languages to allow for user-friendly interfaces. There is a focus on alleviating bottlenecks where content would have previously needed to go through a specialist.
  • Many vendors of CXM applications are placing increased emphasis on strong application integration both within and beyond their portfolios, with systems like ERP and order fulfillment.

Link to Digital Strategy

  • For many organizations that are building out a digital strategy, improving customer experience is often a driving factor: CXM apps enable this goal.
  • As part of a digital strategy, create a comprehensive CXM application portfolio by leveraging both core CRM suites and point solutions.
  • Ensure that a point solution aligns with the digital strategy’s technology drivers and user personas.

CXM KPIs

Strong CXM applications can improve:

  • Lead Intake Volume
  • Lead Conversion Rate
  • Average Time to Resolution
  • First-Contact Resolution Rate
  • Customer Satisfaction Rate
  • Share-of-Mind
  • Share-of-Wallet
  • Customer Lifetime Value
  • Aggregate Reach/Impressions

IT is critical to the success of your CXM strategy

Technology is the key enabler of building strong customer experiences: IT must stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the business to develop a technology framework for CXM.

Top 5 Challenges with CXM for Marketing

  1. Maximizing customer experience ROI
  2. Achieving a single view of the customer
  3. Building new customer experiences
  4. Cultivating a customer-focused culture
  5. Measuring CX investments to business outcomes

Top 5 Obstacles to Enabling CXM for IT

  1. Systems integration
  2. Multichannel complexity
  3. Organizational structure
  4. Data-related issues
  5. Lack of strategy

(Harvard Business Review, 2014)

Only 19% of organizations have a customer experience team tasked with bridging gaps between departments. (Genesys, 2018)

IT and Marketing can only tackle CXM with the full support of each other. The cooperation of the departments is crucial when trying to improve CXM technology capabilities and customer interaction and drive a strong revenue mandate.

CXM failure: Blockbuster

CASE STUDY

Industry Entertainment

Source Forbes, 2014

Blockbuster

As the leader of the video retail industry, Blockbuster had thousands of retail locations internationally and millions of customers. Blockbuster’s massive marketing budget and efficient operations allowed it to dominate the competition for years.

Situation

Trends in Blockbuster’s consumer market changed in terms of distribution channels and customer experience. As the digital age emerged and developed, consumers were looking for immediacy and convenience. This threatened Blockbuster’s traditional, brick-and-mortar B2C operating model.

The Competition

Netflix entered the video retail market, making itself accessible through non-traditional channels (direct mail, and eventually, the internet).

Results

Despite long-term relationships with customers and competitive standing in the market, Blockbuster’s inability to understand and respond to changing technology trends and customer demands led to its demise. The organization did not effectively leverage internal or external networks or technology to adapt to customer demands. Blockbuster went bankrupt in 2010.

Customer Relationship Management

  • Web Experience Management Platform
  • E-Commerce & Point of Sale Solutions
  • Social Media Management
  • Customer Intelligence
  • Customer Service
  • Marketing Management

Blockbuster did not leverage emerging technologies to effectively respond to trends in its consumer network. It did not optimize organizational effectiveness around customer experience.

CXM success: Netflix

CASE STUDY

Industry Entertainment

Source Forbes, 2014

Netflix

Beginning as a mail-out service, Netflix offered subscribers a catalog of videos to select from and have mailed to them directly. Customers no longer had to go to a retail store to rent a video. However, the lack of immediacy of direct mail as the distribution channel resulted in slow adoption.

The Situation

In response to the increasing presence of tech-savvy consumers on the internet, Netflix invested in developing its online platform as its primary distribution channel. The benefit of doing so was two-fold: passive brand advertising (by being present on the internet) and meeting customer demands for immediacy and convenience. Netflix also recognized the rising demand for personalized service and created an unprecedented, tailored customer experience.

The Competition

Blockbuster was the industry leader in video retail but was lagging in its response to industry, consumer, and technology trends around customer experience.

Results

Netflix’s disruptive innovation is built on the foundation of great CXM. Netflix is now a $28 billion company, which is tenfold what Blockbuster was worth.

Customer Relationship Management Platform

  • Web Experience Management Platform
  • E-Commerce & Point of Sale Solutions
  • Social Media Management Platform
  • Customer Intelligence Platform
  • Customer Service Management Tools
  • Marketing Management Suite

Netflix used disruptive technologies to innovatively build a customer experience that put it ahead of the long-time, video rental industry leader, Blockbuster.

Leverage Info-Tech’s approach to succeed with CXM

Creating an end-to-end technology-enablement strategy for CXM requires a concerted, dedicated effort: Info-Tech can help with our proven approach.

Build the CXM Project Charter

Conduct a Thorough Environmental Scan

Build Customer Personas and Scenarios

Draft Strategic CXM Requirements

Build the CXM Application Portfolio

Implement Operational Best Practices

Why Info-Tech’s Approach?

Info-Tech draws on best-practice research and the experiences of our global member base to develop a methodology for CXM that is driven by rigorous customer-centric analysis.

Our approach uses a unique combination of techniques to ensure that your team has done its due diligence in crafting a forward-thinking technology-enablement strategy for CXM that creates measurable value.

A global professional services firm drives measurable value for CXM by using persona design and scenario development

CASE STUDY

Industry Professionals Services

Source Info-Tech Workshop

The Situation

A global professional services firm in the B2B space was experiencing a fragmented approach to customer engagement, particularly in the pre-sales funnel. Legacy applications weren’t keeping pace with an increased demand for lead evaluation and routing technology. Web experience management was also an area of significant concern, with a lack of ongoing customer engagement through the existing web portal.

The Approach

Working with a team of Info-Tech facilitators, the company was able to develop several internal and external customer personas. These personas formed the basis of strategic requirements for a new CXM application stack, which involved dedicated platforms for core CRM, lead automation, web content management, and site analytics.

Results

Customer “stickiness” metrics increased, and Sales reported significantly higher turnaround times in lead evaluations, resulting in improved rep productivity and faster cycle times.

Components of a persona
Name Name personas to reflect a key attribute such as the persona’s primary role or motivation.
Demographic Include basic descriptors of the persona (e.g. age, geographic location, preferred language, education, job, employer, household income, etc.)
Wants, needs, pain points Identify surface-level motivations for buying habits.
Psychographic/behavioral traits Observe persona traits that are representative of the customers’ behaviors (e.g. attitudes, buying patterns, etc.).

Follow Info-Tech’s approach to build your CXM foundation

Create the Project Vision

  • Identify business and IT drivers
  • Outputs:
    • CXM Strategy Guiding Principles

Structure the Project

  • Identify goals and objectives for CXM project
  • Form Project Team
  • Establish timeline
  • Obtain project sponsorship
  • Outputs:
    • CXM Strategy Project Charter

Scan the External Environment

  • Create CXM operating model
  • Conduct external analysis
  • Create customer personas
  • Outputs:
    • CXM Operating Model
  • Conduct PEST analysis
  • Create persona scenarios
  • Outputs:
    • CXM Strategic Requirements

Assess the Current State of CXM

  • Conduct SWOT analysis
  • Assess application usage and satisfaction
  • Conduct VRIO analysis
  • Outputs:
    • CXM Strategic Requirements

Create an Application Portfolio

  • Map current processes
  • Assign business process owners
  • Create channel map
  • Build CXM application portfolio
  • Outputs:
    • CXM Application Portfolio Map

Develop Deployment Best Practices

  • Develop CXM integration map
  • Create mitigation plan for poor data quality
  • Outputs:
    • Data Quality Preservation Map

Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

  • Create risk management plan
  • Identify work initiative dependencies
  • Create roadmap
  • Outputs:
    • CXM Initiative Roadmap

Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

  • Identify success metrics
  • Create stakeholder communication plan
  • Present CXM strategy to stakeholders
  • Outputs:
    • Stakeholder Presentation

Info-Tech offers various levels of support to suit your needs

DIY Toolkit

“Our team has already made this critical project a priority, and we have the time and capability, but some guidance along the way would be helpful.”

Guided Implementation

“Our team knows that we need to fix a process, but we need assistance to determine where to focus. Some check-ins along the way would help keep us on track.”

Workshop

“We need to hit the ground running and get this project kicked off immediately. Our team has the ability to take this over once we get a framework and strategy in place.”

Consulting

“Our team does not have the time or the knowledge to take this project on. We need assistance through the entirety of this project.”

Diagnostics and consistent frameworks used throughout all four options

Build a Strong Technology Foundation for CXM – project overview

1. Drive Value With CXM 2. Create the Framework 3. Finalize the Framework
Best-Practice Toolkit

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the CXM Project

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Guided Implementations
  • Determine project vision for CXM.
  • Review CXM project charter.
  • Review environmental scan.
  • Review application portfolio for CXM.
  • Confirm deployment best practices.
  • Review initiatives rollout plan.
  • Confirm CXM roadmap.
Onsite Workshop Module 1: Drive Measurable Value with a World-Class CXM Program Module 2: Create the Strategic Framework for CXM Module 3: Finalize the CXM Framework

Phase 1 Outcome:

  • Completed drivers
  • Completed project charter

Phase 2 Outcome:

  • Completed personas and scenarios
  • CXM application portfolio

Phase 3 Outcome:

  • Strategic summary blueprint

Workshop overview

Contact your account representative or email Workshops@InfoTech.com for more information.

Workshop Day 1 Workshop Day 2 Workshop Day 3 Workshop Day 4 Workshop Day 5
Activities

Create the Vision for CXM Enablement

1.1 CXM Fireside Chat

1.2 CXM Business Drivers

1.3 CXM Vision Statement

1.4 Project Structure

Conduct the Environmental Scan and Internal Review

2.1 PEST Analysis

2.2 Competitive Analysis

2.3 Market and Trend Analysis

2.4 SWOT Analysis

2.5 VRIO Analysis

2.6 Channel Mapping

Build Personas and Scenarios

3.1 Persona Development

3.2 Scenario Development

3.3 Requirements Definition for CXM

Create the CXM Application Portfolio

4.1 Build Business Process Maps

4.2 Review Application Satisfaction

4.3 Create the CXM Application Portfolio

4.4 Prioritize Applications

Review Best Practices and Confirm Initiatives

5.1 Create Data Integration Map

5.2 Define Adoption Best Practices

5.3 Build Initiatives Roadmap

5.4 Confirm Initiatives Roadmap

Deliverables
  1. CXM Vision Statement
  2. CXM Project Charter
  1. Completed External Analysis
  2. Completed Internal Review
  3. Channel Interaction Map
  4. Strategic Requirements (from External Analysis)
  1. Personas and Scenarios
  2. Strategic Requirements (based on personas)
  1. Business Process Maps
  2. Application Satisfaction Diagnostic
  3. Prioritized CXM Application Portfolio
  1. Integration Map for CXM
  2. End-User Adoption Plan
  3. Initiatives Roadmap

Phase 1

Drive Measurable Value With a World-Class CXM Program

Build a Strong Technology Foundation for Customer Experience Management

Phase 1 outline

Call 1-888-670-8889 or email GuidedImplementations@InfoTech.com for more information.

Complete these steps on your own, or call us to complete a guided implementation. A guided implementation is a series of 2-3 advisory calls that help you execute each phase of a project. They are included in most advisory memberships.

Guided Implementation 1: Drive Measurable Value With a World-Class CXM Program

Proposed Time to Completion: 2 weeks

Step 1.1: Create the Project Vision

Start with an analyst kick-off call:

  • Review key drivers from a technology and business perspective for CXM
  • Discuss benefits of strong technology enablement for CXM

Then complete these activities…

  • CXM Fireside Chat
  • CXM Business and Technology Driver Assessment
  • CXM Vision Statement

With these tools & templates:

  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

Step 1.2: Structure the Project

Review findings with analyst:

  • Assess the CXM vision statement for competitive differentiators
  • Determine current alignment disposition of IT with different business units

Then complete these activities…

  • Team Composition and Responsibilities
  • Metrics Definition

With these tools & templates:

  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template

Phase 1 Results & Insights:

  • Defined value of strong technology enablement for CXM
  • Completed CXM project charter

Step 1.1: Create the Project Vision

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities:

  • Fireside Chat: Discuss past challenges and successes with CXM
  • Identify business and IT drivers to establish guiding principles for CXM

Outcomes:

  • Business benefits of a rationalized technology strategy to support CXM
  • Shared lessons learned
  • Guiding principles for providing technology enablement for CXM

Building a technology strategy to support customer experience isn’t an option – it’s a mission-critical activity

  • Customer-facing departments supply the lifeblood of a company: revenue. In today’s fast-paced and interconnected world, it’s becoming increasingly imperative to enable customer experience processes with a wide range of technologies, from lead automation to social relationship management. CXM is the holistic management of customer interaction processes across marketing, sales, and customer service to create valuable, mutually beneficial customer experiences. Technology is a critical building block for enabling CXM.
  • The parallel progress of technology and process improvement is essential to an efficient and effective CXM program. While many executives prefer to remain at the status quo, new technologies have caused major shifts in the CXM environment. If you stay with the status quo, you will fall behind the competition.
  • However, many IT departments are struggling to keep up with the pace of change and find themselves more of a firefighter than a strategic partner to marketing, sales, and service teams. This not only hurts the business, but it also tarnishes IT’s reputation.

An aligned, optimized CX strategy is:

Rapid: to intentionally and strategically respond to quickly-changing opportunities and issues.

Outcome-based: to make key decisions based on strong business cases, data, and analytics in addition to intuition and judgment.

Rigorous: to bring discipline and science to bear; to improve operations and results.

Collaborative: to conduct activities in a broader ecosystem of partners, suppliers, vendors, co-developers, and even competitors.

(The Wall Street Journal, 2013)

Info-Tech Insight

If IT fails to adequately support marketing, sales, and customer service teams, the organization’s revenue will be in direct jeopardy. As a result, CIOs and Applications Directors must work with their counterparts in these departments to craft a cohesive and comprehensive strategy for using technology to create meaningful (and profitable) customer experiences.

Fireside Chat, Part 1: When was technology an impediment to customer experience at your organization?

1.1.1 30 minutes

Input

  • Past experiences of the team

Output

  • Lessons learned

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Core Team

Instructions

  1. Think about a time when technology was an impediment to a positive customer experience at your organization. Reflect on the following:
    • What frustrations did the application or the technology cause to your customers? What was their reaction?
    • How did IT (and the business) identify the challenge in the first place?
    • What steps were taken to mitigate the impact of the problem? Were these steps successful?
    • What were the key lessons learned as part of the challenge?

Fireside Chat, Part 2: What customer success stories has your organization created by using new technologies?

1.1.2 30 minutes

Input

  • Past experiences of the team

Output

  • Lessons learned

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Core Team

Instructions

  1. Think about a time when your organization successfully leveraged a new application or new technology to enhance the experience it provided to customers. Reflect on this experience and consider:
    • What were the organizational drivers for rolling out the new application or solution?
    • What obstacles had to be overcome in order to successfully deploy the solution?
    • How did the application positively impact the customer experience? What metrics improved?
    • What were the key lessons learned as part of the deployment? If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

Develop a cohesive, consistent, and forward-looking roadmap that supports each stage of the customer lifecycle

When creating your roadmap, consider the pitfalls you’ll likely encounter in building the IT strategy to provide technology enablement for customer experience.

There’s no silver bullet for developing a strategy. You can encounter pitfalls at a myriad of different points including not involving the right stakeholders from the business, not staying abreast of recent trends in the external environment, and not aligning sales, marketing, and support initiatives with a focus on the delivery of value to prospects and customers.

Common Pitfalls When Creating a Technology-Enablement Strategy for CXM

Senior management is not involved in strategy development.

Not paying attention to the “art of the possible.”

“Paving the cow path” rather than focusing on revising core processes.

Misalignment between objectives and financial/personnel resources.

Inexperienced team on either the business or IT side.

Not paying attention to the actions of competitors.

Entrenched management preferences for legacy systems.

Sales culture that downplays the potential value of technology or new applications.

IT is only one or two degrees of separation from the end customer: so take a customer-centric approach

IT →Marketing, Sales, and Service →External Customers

Internal-Facing Applications

  • IT enables, supports, and maintains the applications used by the organization to market to, sell to, and service customers. IT provides the infrastructural and technical foundation to operate the function.

Customer-Facing Applications

  • IT supports customer-facing interfaces and channels for customer interaction.
  • Channel examples include web pages, mobile device applications and optimization, and interactive voice response for callers.

Info-Tech Insight

IT often overlooks direct customer considerations when devising a technology strategy for CXM. Instead, IT leaders rely on other business stakeholders to simply pass on requirements. By sitting down with their counterparts in marketing and sales, and fully understanding business drivers and customer personas, IT will be much better positioned to roll out supporting applications that drive customer engagement.

A well-aligned CXM strategy recognizes a clear delineation of responsibilities between IT, sales, marketing, and service

  • When thinking about CXM, IT must recognize that it is responsible for being a trusted partner for technology enablement. This means that IT has a duty to:
    • Develop an in-depth understanding of strategic business requirements for CXM. Base your understanding of these business requirements on a clear conception of the internal and external environment, customer personas, and business processes in marketing, sales, and customer service.
    • Assist with shortlisting and supporting different channels for customer interaction (including email, telephony, web presence, and social media).
    • Create a rationalized, cohesive application portfolio for CXM that blends different enabling technologies together to support strategic business requirements.
    • Provide support for vendor shortlisting, selection, and implementation of CXM applications.
    • Assist with end-user adoption of CXM applications (i.e. training and ongoing support).
    • Provide initiatives that assist with technical excellence for CXM (such as data quality, integration, analytics, and application maintenance).
  • The business (marketing, sales, customer service) owns the business requirements and must be responsible for setting top-level objectives for customer interaction (e.g. product and pricing decisions, marketing collateral, territory management, etc.). IT should not take over decisions on customer experience strategy. However, IT should be working in lockstep with its counterparts in the business to assist with understanding business requirements through a customer-facing lens. For example, persona development is best done in cross-functional teams between IT and Marketing.

Activity: Identify the business drivers for CXM to establish the strategy’s guiding principles

1.1.3 30 minutes

Input

  • Business drivers for CXM

Output

  • Guiding principles for CXM strategy

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Define the assumptions and business drivers that have an impact on technology enablement for CXM. What is driving the current marketing, sales, and service strategy on the business side?
Business Driver Name Driver Assumptions, Capabilities, and Constraints Impact on CXM Strategy
High degree of customer-centric solution selling A technically complex product means that solution selling approaches are employed – sales cycles are long. There is a strong need for applications and data quality processes that support longer-term customer relationships rather than transactional selling.
High desire to increase scalability of sales processes Although sales cycles are long, the organization wishes to increase the effectiveness of rep time via marketing automation where possible. Sales is always looking for new ways to leverage their reps for face-to-face solution selling while leaving low-level tasks to automation. Marketing wants to support these tasks.
Highly remote sales team and unusual hours are the norm Not based around core hours – significant overtime or remote working occurs frequently. Misalignment between IT working only core hours and after-hours teams leads to lag times that can delay work. Scheduling of preventative sales maintenance must typically be done on weekends rather than weekday evenings.

Activity: Identify the IT drivers for CXM to establish the strategy’s guiding principles

1.1.4 30 minutes

Input

  • IT drivers for CXM

Output

  • Guiding principles for CXM strategy

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Define the assumptions and IT drivers that have an impact on technology enablement for CXM. What is driving the current IT strategy for supporting marketing, sales, and service initiatives?
IT Driver Name Driver Assumptions, Capabilities, and Constraints Impact on CXM Strategy
Sales Application Procurement Methodology Strong preference for on-premise COTS deployments over homebrewed applications. IT may not be able to support cloud-based sales applications due to security requirements for on premise.
Vendor Relations Minimal vendor relationships; SLAs not drafted internally but used as part of standard agreement. IT may want to investigate tightening up SLAs with vendors to ensure more timely support is available for their sales teams.
Development Methodology Agile methodology employed, some pockets of Waterfall employed for large-scale deployments. Agile development means more perfective maintenance requests come in, but it leads to greater responsiveness for making urgent corrective changes to non-COTS products.
Data Quality Approach IT sees as Sales’ responsibility IT is not standing as a strategic partner for helping to keep data clean, causing dissatisfaction from customer-facing departments.
Staffing Availability Limited to 9–5 Execution of sales support takes place during core hours only, limiting response times and access for on-the-road sales personnel.

Activity: Use IT and business drivers to create guiding principles for your CXM technology-enablement project

1.1.5 30 minutes

Input

  • Business drivers and IT drivers from 1.1.3 and 1.1.4

Output

  • CXM mission statement

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Core Team

Instructions

1. Based on the IT and business drivers identified, craft guiding principles for CXM technology enablement. Keep guiding principles in mind throughout the project and ensure they support (or reconcile) the business and IT drivers.

Guiding Principle Description
Sales processes must be scalable. Our sales processes must be able to reach a high number of target customers in a short time without straining systems or personnel.
Marketing processes must be high touch. Processes must be oriented to support technically sophisticated, solution-selling methodologies.

2. Summarize the guiding principles above by creating a CXM mission statement. See below for an example.

Example: CXM Mission Statement

To ensure our marketing, sales and service team is equipped with tools that will allow them to reach out to a large volume of contacts while still providing a solution-selling approach. This will be done with secure, on-premise systems to safeguard customer data.

Ensure that now is the right time to take a step back and develop the CXM strategy

Determine if now is the right time to move forward with building (or overhauling) your technology-enablement strategy for CXM.

Not all organizations will be able to proceed immediately to optimize their CXM technology enablement. Determine if the organizational willingness, backbone, and resources are present to commit to overhauling the existing strategy. If you’re not ready to proceed, consider waiting to begin this project until you can procure the right resources.

Do not proceed if:

  • Your current strategy for supporting marketing, sales, and service is working well and IT is already viewed as a strategic partner by these groups. Your current strategy is well aligned with customer preferences.
  • The current strategy is not working well, but there is no consensus or support from senior management for improving it.
  • You cannot secure the resources or time to devote to thoroughly examining the current state and selecting improvement initiatives.
  • The strategy has been approved, but there is no budget in place to support it at this time.

Proceed if:

  • Senior management has agreed that technology support for CXM should be improved.
  • Sub-divisions within IT, sales, marketing, and service are on the same page about the need to improve alignment.
  • You have an approximate budget to work with for the project and believe you can secure additional funding to execute at least some improvement initiatives.
  • You understand how improving CXM alignment will fit into the broader customer interaction ecosystem in your organization.

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

  • To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.
  • Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team onsite at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.
  • Contact your account manager (www.infotech.com/account), or email Workshops@InfoTech.com for more information.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

1.1.3; 1.1.4; 1.1.5 - Identify business and IT drivers to create CXM guiding principles

The facilitator will work with stakeholders from both the business and IT to identify implicit or explicit strategic drivers that will support (or pose constraints on) the technology-enablement framework for the CXM strategy. In doing so, guiding principles will be established for the project.

Step 1.2: Structure the Project

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities:

  • Define the project purpose, objectives, and business metrics
  • Define the scope of the CXM strategy
  • Create the project team
  • Build a RACI chart
  • Develop a timeline with project milestones
  • Identify risks and create mitigation strategies
  • Complete the strategy project charter and obtain approval

Outcomes:

CXM Strategy Project Charter Template

  • Purpose, objectives, metrics
  • Scope
  • Project team & RACI
  • Timeline
  • Risks & mitigation strategies
  • Project sponsorship

Use Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Project Charter Template to outline critical components of the CXM project

1.2.1 CXM Strategy Project Charter Template

Having a project charter is the first step for any project: it specifies how the project will be resourced from a people, process, and technology perspective, and it clearly outlines major project milestones and timelines for strategy development. CXM technology enablement crosses many organizational boundaries, so a project charter is a very useful tool for ensuring everyone is on the same page.

Sections of the document:

  1. Project Drivers, Rationale, and Context
  2. Project Objectives, Metrics, and Purpose
  3. Project Scope Definition
  4. Project Team Roles and Responsibilities (RACI)
  5. Project Timeline
  6. Risk Mitigation Strategy
  7. Project Metrics
  8. Project Review & Approvals

INFO-TECH DELIVERABLE

CXM Strategy Project Charter Template

Populate the relevant sections of your project charter as you complete activities 1.2.2-1.2.8.

Understand the roles necessary to complete your CXM technology-enablement strategy

Understand the role of each player within your project structure. Look for listed participants on the activities slides to determine when each player should be involved.

Title Role Within Project Structure
Project Sponsor
  • Owns the project at the management/C-suite level
  • Responsible for breaking down barriers and ensuring alignment with organizational strategy
  • CIO, CMO, VP of Sales, VP of Customer Care, or similar
Project Manager
  • The IT individual(s) that will oversee day-to-day project operations
  • Responsible for preparing and managing the project plan and monitoring the project team’s progress
  • Applications or other IT Manager, Business Analyst, Business Process Owner, or similar
Business Lead
  • Works alongside the IT PM to ensure that the strategy is aligned with business needs
  • In this case, likely to be a marketing, sales, or customer service lead
  • Sales Director, Marketing Director, Customer Care Director, or similar
Project Team
  • Comprised of individuals whose knowledge and skills are crucial to project success
  • Responsible for driving day-to-day activities, coordinating communication, and making process and design decisions. Can assist with persona and scenario development for CXM.
  • Project Manager, Business Lead, CRM Manager, Integration Manager, Application SMEs, Developers, Business Process Architects, and/or similar SMEs
Steering Committee
  • Comprised of C-suite/management level individuals that act as the project’s decision makers
  • Responsible for validating goals and priorities, defining the project scope, enabling adequate resourcing, and managing change
  • Project Sponsor, Project Manager, Business Lead, CFO, Business Unit SMEs and similar

Info-Tech Insight

Do not limit project input or participation to the aforementioned roles. Include subject matter experts and internal stakeholders at particular stages within the project. Such inputs can be solicited on a one-off basis as needed. This ensures you take a holistic approach to creating your CXM technology-enablement strategy.

Activity: Kick-off the CXM project by defining the project purpose, project objectives, and business metrics

1.2.2 30 minutes

Input

  • Activities 1.1.1 to 1.1.5

Output

  • Drivers & rationale
  • Purpose statement
  • Business goals
  • Business metrics
  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template, sections 1.0, 2.0, and 2.1

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Sponsor
  • Project Manager
  • Business Lead
  • Steering Committee

Instructions

Hold a meeting with IT, Marketing, Sales, Service, Operations, and any other impacted business stakeholders that have input into CXM to accomplish the following:

  1. Discuss the drivers and rationale behind embarking on a CXM strategy.
  2. Develop and concede on objectives for the CXM project, metrics that will gauge its success, and goals for each metric.
  3. Create a project purpose statement that is informed by decided-upon objectives and metrics from the steps above. When establishing a project purpose, ask the question, “what are we trying to accomplish?”
    • Example: Project Purpose Statement
      • The organization is creating a CXM strategy to gather high-level requirements from the business, IT, and Marketing, Sales, and Service, to ensure that the selection and deployment of the CXM meets the needs of the broader organization and provides the greatest return on investment.
  4. Document your project drivers and rationale, purpose statement, project objectives, and business metrics in Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Project Charter Template in sections 1.0 and 2.0.

Info-Tech Insight

Going forward, set up a quarterly review process to understand changing needs. It is rare that organizations never change their marketing and sales strategy. This will change the way the CXM will be utilized.

Establish baseline metrics for customer engagement

In order to gauge the effectiveness of CXM technology enablement, establish core metrics:

  1. Marketing Metrics: pertaining to share of voice, share of wallet, market share, lead generation, etc.
  2. Sales Metrics: pertaining to overall revenue, average deal size, number of accounts, MCV, lead warmth, etc.
  3. Customer Service Metrics: pertaining to call volumes, average time to resolution, first contact resolution, customer satisfaction, etc.
  4. IT Metrics: pertaining to end-user satisfaction with CXM applications, number of tickets, contract value, etc.
Metric Description Current Metric Future Goal
Market Share 25% 35%
Share of Voice (All Channels) 40% 50%
Average Deal Size $10,500 $12,000
Account Volume 1,400 1,800
Average Time to Resolution 32 min 25 min
First Contact Resolution 15% 35%
Web Traffic per Month (Unique Visitors) 10,000 15,000
End-User Satisfaction 62% 85%+
Other metric
Other metric
Other metric

Understand the importance of setting project expectations with a scope statement

Be sure to understand what is in scope for a CXM strategy project. Prevent too wide of a scope to avoid scope creep – for example, we aren’t tackling ERP or BI under CXM.

In Scope

Establishing the parameters of the project in a scope statement helps define expectations and provides a baseline for resource allocation and planning. Future decisions about the strategic direction of CXM will be based on the scope statement.

Scope Creep

Well-executed requirements gathering will help you avoid expanding project parameters, drawing on your resources, and contributing to cost overruns and project delays. Avoid scope creep by gathering high-level requirements that lead to the selection of category-level application solutions (e.g. CRM, MMS, SMMP, etc.), rather than granular requirements that would lead to vendor application selection (e.g. Salesforce, Marketo, Hootsuite, etc.).

Out of Scope

Out-of-scope items should also be defined to alleviate ambiguity, reduce assumptions, and further clarify expectations for stakeholders. Out-of-scope items can be placed in a backlog for later consideration. For example, fulfilment and logistics management is out of scope as it pertains to CXM.

In Scope
Strategy
High-Level CXM Application Requirements CXM Strategic Direction Category Level Application Solutions (e.g. CRM, MMS, etc.)
Out of Scope
Software Selection
Vendor Application Review Vendor Application Selection Granular Application System Requirements

Activity: Define the scope of the CXM strategy

1.2.3 30 minutes

Input

  • N/A

Output

  • Project scope and parameters
  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template, section 3.0

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Sponsor
  • Project Manager
  • Business Lead

Instructions

  1. Formulate a scope statement. Decide which people, processes, and functions the CXM strategy will address. Generally, the aim of this project is to develop strategic requirements for the CXM application portfolio – not to select individual vendors.
  2. Document your scope statement in Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Project Charter Template in section 3.0.

To form your scope statement, ask the following questions:

  • What are the major coverage points?
  • Who will be using the systems?
  • How will different users interact with the systems?
  • What are the objectives that need to be addressed?
  • Where do we start?
  • Where do we draw the line?

Identify the right stakeholders to include on your project team

Consider the core team functions when composing the project team. Form a cross-functional team (i.e. across IT, Marketing, Sales, Service, Operations) to create a well-aligned CXM strategy.

Required Skills/Knowledge Suggested Project Team Members
IT
  • Application development
  • Enterprise integration
  • Business processes
  • Data management
  • CRM Application Manager
  • Business Process Manager
  • Integration Manager
  • Application Developer
  • Data Stewards
Business
  • Understanding of the customer
  • Departmental processes
  • Sales Manager
  • Marketing Manager
  • Customer Service Manager
Other
  • Operations
  • Administrative
  • Change management
  • Operations Manager
  • CFO
  • Change Management Manager

Info-Tech Insight

Don’t let your project team become too large when trying to include all relevant stakeholders. Carefully limiting the size of the project team will enable effective decision making while still including functional business units such as marketing, sales, service, and finance, as well as IT.

Activity: Create the project team

1.2.4 45 minutes

Input

  • Scope Statement (output of Activity 1.2.3).

Output

  • Project Team
  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template, section 4.0

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Manager
  • Business Lead

Instructions

  1. Review your scope statement. Have a discussion to generate a complete list of key stakeholders that are needed to achieve the scope of work.
  2. Using the previously generated list, identify a candidate for each role and determine their responsibilities and expected time commitment for the CXM strategy project.
  3. Document the project team in Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Project Charter Template in section 4.0.

Define project roles and responsibilities to improve progress tracking

Build a list of the core CXM strategy team members, and then structure a RACI chart with the relevant categories and roles for the overall project.

Responsible - Conducts work to achieve the task

Accountable - Answerable for completeness of task

Consulted - Provides input for the task

Informed - Receives updates on the task

Info-Tech Insight

Avoid missed tasks between inter-functional communications by defining roles and responsibilities for the project as early as possible.

Benefits of Assigning RACI Early:

  • Improve project quality by assigning the right people to the right tasks.
  • Improve chances of project task completion by assigning clear accountabilities.
  • Improve project buy-in by ensuring that stakeholders are kept informed of project progress, risks, and successes.

Activity: Build a RACI chart

1.2.5 30 minutes

Input

  • Project Team (output of Activity 1.2.4)

Output

  • RACI chart
  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template, section 4.2

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Manager
  • Business Lead

Instructions

  1. Identify the key stakeholder teams that should be involved in the CXM strategy project. You should have a cross-functional team that encompasses both IT (various units) and the business.
  2. Determine whether each stakeholder should be responsible, accountable, consulted, and/or informed with respect to each overarching project step.
  3. Confirm and communicate the results to relevant stakeholders and obtain their approval.
  4. Document the RACI chart in Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Project Charter Template in section 4.2.
Example: RACI Chart Project Sponsor (e.g. CMO) Project Manager (e.g. Applications Manager) Business Lead (e.g. Marketing Director) Steering Committee (e.g. PM, CMO, CFO…) Project Team (e.g. PM, BL, SMEs…)
Assess Project Value I C A R C
Conduct a Current State Assessment I I A C R
Design Application Portfolio I C A R I
Create CXM Roadmap R R A I I
... ... ... ... ... ...

Activity: Develop a timeline in order to specify concrete project milestones

1.2.6 30 minutes

Input

  • N/A

Output

  • Project timeline
  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template, section 5.0

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Manager
  • Business Lead

Instructions

  1. Assign responsibilities, accountabilities, and other project involvement to each project team role using a RACI chart. Remember to consider dependencies when creating the schedule and identifying appropriate subtasks.
  2. Document the timeline in Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Project Charter Template in section 5.0.
Key Activities Start Date End Date Target Status Resource(s)
Structure the Project and Build the Project Team
Articulate Business Objectives and Define Vision for Future State
Document Current State and Assess Gaps
Identify CXM Technology Solutions
Build the Strategy for CXM
Implement the Strategy

Assess project-associated risk by understanding common barriers and enablers

Common Internal Risk Factors

Management Support Change Management IT Readiness
Definition The degree of understanding and acceptance of CXM as a concept and necessary portfolio of technologies. The degree to which employees are ready to accept change and the organization is ready to manage it. The degree to which the organization is equipped with IT resources to handle new systems and processes.
Assessment Outcomes
  • Is CXM enablement recognized as a top priority?
  • Will management commit time to the project?
  • Are employees resistant to change?
  • Is there an organizational awareness of the importance of customer experience?
  • Who are the owners of process and content?
  • Is there strong technical expertise?
  • Is there strong infrastructure?
  • What are the important integration points throughout the business?
Risk
  • Low management buy-in
  • Lack of funding
  • Lack of resources
  • Low employee motivation
  • Lack of ownership
  • Low user adoption
  • Poor implementation
  • Reliance on consultants

Activity: Identify the risks and create mitigation strategies

1.2.7 45 minutes

Input

  • N/A

Output

  • Risk mitigation strategy
  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template, section 6.0

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Manager
  • Business Lead
  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Brainstorm a list of possible risks that may impede the progress of your CXM project.
  2. Classify risks as strategy based (related to planning) or systems based (related to technology).
  3. Brainstorm mitigation strategies to overcome each risk.
  4. On a scale of 1 to 3, determine the impact of each risk on project success and the likelihood of each risk occurring.
  5. Document your findings in Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Project Charter Template in section 6.0.

Likelihood:

1 - High/Needs Focus

2 - Can Be Mitigated

3 - Unlikely

Impact

1 - High Impact

2 - Moderate Impact

3 - Minimal Impact

Example: Risk Register and Mitigation Tactics

Risk Impact Likelihood Mitigation Effort
Cost of time and implementation: designing a robust portfolio of CXM applications can be a time consuming task, representing a heavy investment for the organization 1 1
  • Have a clear strategic plan and a defined time frame
  • Know your end-user requirements
  • Put together an effective and diverse strategy project team
Availability of resources: lack of in-house resources (e.g. infrastructure, CXM application developers) may result in the need to insource or outsource resources 1 2
  • Prepare a plan to insource talent by hiring or transferring talent from other departments – e.g. marketing and customer service

Activity: Complete the project charter and obtain approval

1.2.8 45 minutes

Input

  • N/A

Output

  • Project approval
  • CXM Strategy Project Charter Template, section 8.0

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Manager
  • Business Lead
  • Project Team

Instructions

Before beginning to develop the CXM strategy, validate the project charter and metrics with senior sponsors or stakeholders and receive their approval to proceed.

  1. Schedule a 30-60 minute meeting with senior stakeholders and conduct a live review of your CXM strategy project charter.
  2. Obtain stakeholder approval to ensure there are no miscommunications or misunderstandings around the scope of the work that needs to be done to reach a successful project outcome. Final sign-off should only take place when mutual consensus has been reached.
    • Obtaining approval should be an iterative process; if senior management has concerns over certain aspects of the plan, revise and review again.

Info-Tech Insight

In most circumstances, you should have your CXM strategy project charter validated with the following stakeholders:

  • Chief Information Officer
  • IT Applications Director
  • CFO or Comptroller (for budget approval)
  • Chief Marketing Office or Head of Marketing
  • Chief Revenue Officer or VP of Sales
  • VP Customer Service

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

1.2.2 Define project purpose, objectives, and business metrics

Through an in-depth discussion, an analyst will help you prioritize corporate objectives and organizational drivers to establish a distinct project purpose.

1.2.3 Define the scope of the CXM strategy

An analyst will facilitate a discussion to address critical questions to understand your distinct business needs. These questions include: What are the major coverage points? Who will be using the system?

1.2.4; 1.2.5; 1.2.6 Create the CXM project team, build a RACI chart, and establish a timeline

Our analysts will guide you through how to create a designated project team to ensure the success of your CXM strategy and suite selection initiative, including project milestones and team composition, as well as designated duties and responsibilities.

Phase 2

Create a Strategic Framework for CXM Technology Enablement

Build a Strong Technology Foundation for Customer Experience Management

Phase 2 outline: Steps 2.1 and 2.2

Call 1-888-670-8889 or email GuidedImplementations@InfoTech.com for more information.

Complete these steps on your own, or call us to complete a guided implementation. A guided implementation is a series of 2-3 advisory calls that help you execute each phase of a project. They are included in most advisory memberships.

Guided Implementation 2: Create a Strategic Framework for CXM Technology Enablement

Proposed Time to Completion: 4 weeks

Step 2.1: Scan the External Environment

Start with an analyst kick-off call:

  • Discuss external drivers
  • Assess competitive environment
  • Review persona development
  • Review scenarios

Then complete these activities…

  • Build the CXM operating model
  • Conduct a competitive analysis
  • Conduct a PEST analysis
  • Build personas and scenarios

With these tools & templates:

CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

Step 2.2: Assess the Current State for CRM

Review findings with analyst:

  • Review SWOT analysis
  • Review VRIO analysis
  • Discuss strategic requirements for CXM

Then complete these activities…

  • Conduct a SWOT analysis
  • Conduct a VRIO analysis
  • Inventory existing applications

With these tools & templates:

CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

Phase 2 outline: Steps 2.3 and 2.4

Call 1-888-670-8889 or email GuidedImplementations@InfoTech.com for more information.

Complete these steps on your own, or call us to complete a guided implementation. A guided implementation is a series of 2-3 advisory calls that help you execute each phase of a project. They are included in most advisory memberships.

Guided Implementation 2: Create a Strategic Framework for CXM Technology Enablement

Proposed Time to Completion: 4 weeks

Step 2.3: Create an Application Portfolio

Start with an analyst kick-off call:

  • Discuss possible business process maps
  • Discuss strategic requirements
  • Review application portfolio results

Then complete these activities…

  • Build business maps
  • Execute application mapping

With these tools & templates:

CXM Portfolio Designer

CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

CXM Business Process Shortlisting Tool

Step 2.4: Develop Deployment Best Practices

Review findings with analyst:

  • Review possible integration maps
  • Discuss best practices for end-user adoption
  • Discuss best practices for customer data quality

Then complete these activities…

  • Create CXM integration ecosystem
  • Develop adoption game plan
  • Create data quality standards

With these tools & templates:

CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

Phase 2 Results & Insights:

  • Application portfolio for CXM
  • Deployment best practices for areas such as integration, data quality, and end-user adoption

Step 2.1: Scan the External Environment

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities:

  • Inventory CXM drivers and organizational objectives
  • Identify CXM challenges and pain points
  • Discuss opportunities and benefits
  • Align corporate and CXM strategies
  • Conduct a competitive analysis
  • Conduct a PEST analysis and extract strategic requirements
  • Build customer personas and extract strategic requirements

Outcomes:

  • CXM operating model
    • Organizational drivers
    • Environmental factors
    • Barriers
    • Enablers
  • PEST analysis
  • External customer personas
  • Customer journey scenarios
  • Strategic requirements for CXM

Develop a CXM technology operating model that takes stock of needs, drivers, barriers, and enablers

Establish the drivers, enablers, and barriers to developing a CXM technology enablement strategy. In doing so, consider needs, environmental factors, organizational drivers, and technology drivers as inputs.

CXM Strategy

  • Barriers
    • Lack of Resources
    • Cultural Mindset
    • Resistance to Change
    • Poor End-User Adoption
  • Enablers
    • Senior Management Support
    • Customer Data Quality
    • Current Technology Portfolio
  • Business Needs (What are your business drivers? What are current marketing, sales, and customer service pains?)
    • Acquisition Pipeline Management
    • Live Chat for Support
    • Social Media Analytics
    • Etc.
  • Organizational Goals
    • Increase Profitability
    • Enhance Customer Experience Consistency
    • Reduce Time-to-Resolution
    • Increase First Contact Resolution
    • Boost Share of Voice
  • Environmental Factors (What factors that affect your strategy are out of your control?)
    • Customer Buying Habits
    • Changing Technology Trends
    • Competitive Landscape
    • Regulatory Requirements
  • Technology Drivers (Why do you need a new system? What is the purpose for becoming an integrated organization?)
    • System Integration
    • Reporting Capabilities
    • Deployment Model

Understand your needs, drivers, and organizational objectives for creating a CXM strategy

Business Needs Organizational Drivers Technology Drivers Environmental Factors
Definition A business need is a requirement associated with a particular business process (for example, Marketing needs customer insights from the website – the business need would therefore be web analytics capabilities). Organizational drivers can be thought of as business-level goals. These are tangible benefits the business can measure such as customer retention, operation excellence, and financial performance. Technology drivers are technological changes that have created the need for a new CXM enablement strategy. Many organizations turn to technology systems to help them obtain a competitive edge. External considerations are factors taking place outside of the organization that are impacting the way business is conducted inside the organization. These are often outside the control of the business.
Examples
  • Web analytics
  • Live chat capabilities
  • Mobile self-service
  • Social media listening
  • Data quality
  • Customer satisfaction
  • Branding
  • Time-to-resolution
  • Deployment model (i.e. SaaS)
  • Integration
  • Reporting capabilities
  • Fragmented technologies
  • Economic factors
  • Customer preferences
  • Competitive influencers
  • Compliance regulations

Info-Tech Insight

A common organizational driver is to provide adequate technology enablement across multiple channels, resulting in a consistent customer experience. This driver is a result of external considerations. Many industries today are highly competitive and rapidly changing. To succeed under these pressures, you must have a rationalized portfolio of enterprise applications for customer interaction.

Activity: Inventory and discuss CXM drivers and organizational objectives

2.1.1 30 minutes

Input

  • Business needs
  • Exercise 1.1.3
  • Exercise 1.1.4
  • Environmental factors

Output

  • CXM operating model inputs
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Info-Tech examples
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Brainstorm the business needs, organizational drivers, technology drivers, and environmental factors that will inform the CXM strategy. Draw from exercises 1.1.3-1.1.5.
  2. Document your findings in the CXM operating model template. This can be found in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

The image is a graphic, with a rectangle split into three sections in the centre. The three sections are: Barriers; CXM Strategy; Enablers. Around the centre are 4 more rectangles, labelled: Business Needs; Organizational Drivers; Technology Drivers; Environmental Factors. The outer rectangles are a slightly darker shade of grey than the others, highlighting them.

Understand challenges and barriers to creating and executing the CXM technology-enablement strategy

Take stock of internal challenges and barriers to effective CXM strategy execution.

Example: Internal Challenges & Potential Barriers

Understanding the Customer Change Management IT Readiness
Definition The degree to which a holistic understanding of the customer can be created, including customer demographic and psychographics. The degree to which employees are ready to accept operational and cultural changes and the degree to which the organization is ready to manage it. The degree to which IT is ready to support new technologies and processes associated with a portfolio of CXM applications.
Questions to Ask
  • As an organization, do we have a true understanding of our customers?
  • How might we achieve a complete understanding of the customer throughout different phases of the customer lifecycle?
  • Are employees resistant to change?
  • Are there enough resources to drive an CXM strategy?
  • To what degree is the existing organizational culture customer-centric?
  • Is there strong technical expertise?
  • Is there strong infrastructure?
Implications
  • Uninformed creation of CXM strategic requirements
  • Inadequate understanding of customer needs and wants
  • User acceptance
  • Lack of ownership
  • Lack of accountability
  • Lack of sustainability
  • Poor implementation
  • Reliance on expensive external consultants
  • Lack of sustainability

Activity: Identify CXM challenges and pain points

2.1.2 30 minutes

Input

  • Challenges
  • Pain points

Output

  • CXM operating model barriers
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Info-Tech examples
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Brainstorm the challenges and pain points that may act as barriers to the successful planning and execution of a CXM strategy.
  2. Document your findings in the CXM operating model template. This can be found in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

The image is the same graphic from a previous section. In this instance, the Barriers sections is highlighted.

Identify opportunities that can enable CXM strategy execution

Existing internal conditions, capabilities, and resources can create opportunities to enable the CXM strategy. These opportunities are critical to overcoming challenges and barriers.

Example: Opportunities to Leverage for Strategy Enablement

Management Buy-In Customer Data Quality Current Technology Portfolio
Definition The degree to which upper management understands and is willing to enable a CXM project, complete with sponsorship, funding, and resource allocation. The degree to which customer data is accurate, consistent, complete, and reliable. Strong customer data quality is an opportunity – poor data quality is a barrier. The degree to which the existing portfolio of CXM-supporting enterprise applications can be leveraged to enable the CXM strategy.
Questions to Ask
  • Is management informed of changing technology trends and the subsequent need for CXM?
  • Are adequate funding and resourcing available to support a CXM project, from strategy creation to implementation?
  • Are there any data quality issues?
  • Is there one source of truth for customer data?
  • Are there duplicate or incomplete sets of data?
  • Does a strong CRM backbone exist?
  • What marketing, sales, and customer service applications exist?
  • Are CXM-enabling applications rated highly on usage and performance?
Implications
  • Need for CXM clearly demonstrated
  • Financial and logistical feasibility
  • Consolidated data quality governance initiatives
  • Informed decision making
  • Foundation for CXM technology enablement largely in place
  • Reduced investment of time and money needed

Activity: Discuss opportunities and benefits

2.1.3 30 minutes

Input

  • Opportunities
  • Benefits

Output

  • Completed CXM operating model
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Info-Tech examples
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Brainstorm opportunities that should be leveraged or benefits that should be realized to enable the successful planning and execution of a CXM strategy.
  2. Document your findings in the CXM operating model template. This can be found in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

The image is the same graphic from earlier sections, this time with the Enablers section highlighted.

Ensure that you align your CXM technology strategy to the broader corporate strategy

A successful CXM strategy requires a comprehensive understanding of an organization’s overall corporate strategy and its effects on the interrelated departments of marketing, sales, and service, including subsequent technology implications. For example, a CXM strategy that emphasizes tools for omnichannel management and is at odds with a corporate strategy that focuses on only one or two channels will fail.

Corporate Strategy

  • Conveys the current state of the organization and the path it wants to take.
  • Identifies future goals and business aspirations.
  • Communicates the initiatives that are critical for getting the organization from its current state to the future state.

CXM Strategy

  • Communicates the company’s budget and spending on CXM applications and initiatives.
  • Identifies IT initiatives that will support the business and key CXM objectives, specific to marketing, sales, and service.
  • Outlines staffing and resourcing for CXM initiatives.

Unified Strategy

  • The CXM implementation can be linked, with metrics, to the corporate strategy and ultimate business objectives.

Info-Tech Insight

Your organization’s corporate strategy is especially important in dictating the direction of the CXM strategy. Corporate strategies are often focused on customer-facing activity and will heavily influence the direction of marketing, sales, customer service, and consequentially, CXM. Corporate strategies will often dictate market targeting, sales tactics, service models, and more.

Review sample organizational objectives to decipher how CXM technologies can support such objectives

Identifying organizational objectives of high priority will assist in breaking down CXM objectives to better align with the overall corporate strategy and achieve buy-in from key stakeholders.

Corporate Objectives Aligned CXM Technology Objectives
Increase Revenue Enable lead scoring Deploy sales collateral management tools Improve average cost per lead via a marketing automation tool
Enhance Market Share Enhance targeting effectiveness with a CRM Increase social media presence via an SMMP Architect customer intelligence analysis
Improve Customer Satisfaction Reduce time-to-resolution via better routing Increase accessibility to customer service with live chat Improve first contact resolution with customer KB
Increase Customer Retention Use a loyalty management application Improve channel options for existing customers Use customer analytics to drive targeted offers
Create Customer-Centric Culture Ensure strong training and user adoption programs Use CRM to provide 360-degree view of all customer interaction Incorporate the voice of the customer into product development

Activity: Review your corporate strategy and validate its alignment with the CXM operating model

2.1.4 30 minutes

Input

  • Corporate strategy
  • CXM operating model (completed in Activity 2.1.3)

Output

  • Strategic alignment between the business and CXM strategies

Materials

  • Info-Tech examples
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Brainstorm and create a list of organizational objectives at the corporate strategy level.
  2. Break down each organizational objective to identify how CXM may support it.
  3. Validate CXM goals and organizational objectives with your CXM operating model. Be sure to address the validity of each with the business needs, organizational drivers, technology drivers, and environmental factors identified as inputs to the operating model.

Amazon leverages customer data to drive decision making around targeted offers and customer experience

CASE STUDY

Industry E-Commerce

Source Pardot, 2012

Situation

Amazon.com, Inc. is an American electronic commerce and cloud computing company. It is the largest e-commerce retailer in the US.

Amazon originated as an online book store, later diversifying to sell various forms of media, software, games, electronics, apparel, furniture, food, toys, and more.

By taking a data-driven approach to marketing and sales, Amazon was able to understand its customers’ needs and wants, penetrate different product markets, and create a consistently personalized online-shopping customer experience that keeps customers coming back.

Technology Strategy

Use Browsing Data Effectively

Amazon leverages marketing automation suites to view recent activities of prospects on its website. In doing so, a more complete view of the customer is achieved, including insights into purchasing interests and site navigation behaviors.

Optimize Based on Interactions

Using customer intelligence, Amazon surveys and studies standard engagement metrics like open rate, click-through rate, and unsubscribes to ensure the optimal degree of marketing is being targeted to existing and prospective customers, depending on level of engagement.

Results

Insights gained from having a complete understanding of the customer (from basic demographic characteristics provided in customer account profiles to observed psychographic behaviors captured by customer intelligence applications) are used to personalize Amazon’s sales and marketing approaches. This is represented through targeted suggestions in the “recommended for you” section of the browsing experience and tailored email marketing.

It is this capability, partnered with the technological ability to observe and measure customer engagement, that allows Amazon to create individual customer experiences.

Scan the external environment to understand your customers, competitors, and macroenvironmental trends

Do not develop your CXM technology strategy in isolation. Work with Marketing to understand your STP strategy (segmentation, targeting, positioning): this will inform persona development and technology requirements downstream.

Market Segmentation

  • Segment target market by demographic, geographic, psychographic, and behavioral characteristics
  • What does the competitive market look like?
  • Who are the key customer segments?
  • What segments are you going to target?

Market Targeting

  • Evaluate potential and commercial attractiveness of each segment, considering the dynamics of the competition
  • How do you target your customers?
  • How should you target them in the future?
  • How do your products/services differ from the competition?

Product Positioning

  • Develop detailed product positioning and marketing mixes for selected segments
  • What is the value of the product/service to each segment of the market?
  • How are you positioning your product/service in the market?

Info-Tech Insight

It is at this point that you should consider the need for and viability of an omnichannel approach to CXM. Through which channels do you target your customers? Are your customers present and active on a wide variety of channels? Consider how you can position your products, services, and brand through the use of omnichannel methodologies.

Activity: Conduct a competitive analysis to understand where your market is going

2.1.5 1 hour

Input

  • Scan of competitive market
  • Existing customer STP strategy

Output

  • Strategic CXM requirements
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team
  • Marketing SME

Instructions

  1. Scan the market for direct and indirect competitors.
  2. Evaluate current and/or future segmentation, targeting, and positioning strategies by answering the following questions:
    • What does the competitive market look like?
    • Who are the key customer segments?
    • What segments are you going to target?
    • How do you target your customers?
    • How should you target them in the future?
    • How do your products/services differ from the competition?
    • What is the value of the product/service to each segment of the market?
    • How are you positioning your product/service in the market?
    • Other helpful questions include:
      • How formally do you target customers? (e.g. through direct contact vs. through passive brand marketing)
      • Does your organization use the shotgun or rifle approach to marketing?
        • Shotgun marketing: targets a broad segment of people, indirectly
        • Rifle marketing: targets smaller and more niche market segments using customer intelligence
  3. For each point, identify CXM requirements.
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Activity: Conduct a competitive analysis (cont’d)

2.1.5 30 minutes

Input

  • Scan of competitive market

Output

  • Competitive analysis
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team
  • Marketing SME (e.g. Market Research Stakeholders)

Instructions

  1. List recent marketing technology and customer experience-related initiatives that your closest competitors have implemented.
  2. For each identified initiative, elaborate on what the competitive implications are for your organization.
  3. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Competitive Implications

Competitor Organization Recent Initiative Associated Technology Direction of Impact Competitive Implication
Organization X Multichannel E-Commerce Integration WEM – hybrid integration Positive
  • Up-to-date e-commerce capabilities
  • Automatic product updates via PCM
Organization Y Web Social Analytics WEM Positive
  • Real-time analytics and customer insights
  • Allows for more targeted content toward the visitor or customer

Conduct a PEST analysis to determine salient political, economic, social, and technological impacts for CXM

A PEST analysis is a structured planning method that identifies external environmental factors that could influence the corporate and IT strategy.

Political - Examine political factors, such as relevant data protection laws and government regulations.

Economic - Examine economic factors, such as funding, cost of web access, and labor shortages for maintaining the site(s).

Technological - Examine technological factors, such as new channels, networks, software and software frameworks, database technologies, wireless capabilities, and availability of software as a service.

Social - Examine social factors, such as gender, race, age, income, and religion.

Info-Tech Insight

When looking at opportunities and threats, PEST analysis can help to ensure that you do not overlook external factors, such as technological changes in your industry. When conducting your PEST analysis specifically for CXM, pay particular attention to the rapid rate of change in the technology bucket. New channels and applications are constantly emerging and evolving, and seeing differential adoption by potential customers.

Activity: Conduct and review the PEST analysis

2.1.6 30 minutes

Input

  • Political, economic, social, and technological factors related to CXM

Output

  • Completed PEST analysis

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Identify your current strengths and weaknesses in managing the customer experience.
  2. Identify any opportunities to take advantage of and threats to mitigate.

Example: PEST Analysis

Political

  • Data privacy for PII
  • ADA legislation for accessible design

Economic

  • Spending via online increasing
  • Focus on share of wallet

Technological

  • Rise in mobile
  • Geo-location based services
  • Internet of Things
  • Omnichannel

Social

  • Increased spending power by millennials
  • Changing channel preferences
  • Self-service models

Activity: Translate your PEST analysis into a list of strategic CXM technology requirements to be addressed

2.1.7 30 minutes

Input

  • PEST Analysis conducted in Activity 2.1.6.

Output

  • Strategic CXM requirements
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

For each PEST quadrant:

  1. Document the point and relate it to a goal.
  2. For each point, identify CXM requirements.
  3. Sort goals and requirements to eliminate duplicates.
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Parsing Requirements from PEST Analysis

Technological Trend: There has been a sharp increase in popularity of mobile self-service models for buying habits and customer service access.

Goal: Streamline mobile application to be compatible with all mobile devices. Create consistent branding across all service delivery applications (e.g. website, etc.).

Strategic Requirement: Develop a native mobile application while also ensuring that resources through our web presence are built with responsive design interface.

IT must fully understand the voice of the customer: work with Marketing to develop customer personas

Creating a customer-centric CXM technology strategy requires archetypal customer personas. Creating customer personas will enable you to talk concretely about them as consumers of your customer experience and allow you to build buyer scenarios around them.

A persona (or archetypal user) is an invented person that represents a type of user in a particular use-case scenario. In this case, personas can be based on real customers.

Components of a persona Example – Organization: Grocery Store
Name Name personas to reflect a key attribute such as the persona’s primary role or motivation Brand Loyal Linda: A stay-at-home mother dedicated to maintaining and caring for a household of 5 people
Demographic Include basic descriptors of the persona (e.g. age, geographic location, preferred language, education, job, employer, household income, etc.) Age: 42 years old Geographic location: London Suburbia Language: English Education: Post-secondary Job: Stay-at-home mother Annual Household Income: $100,000+
Wants, needs, pain points Identify surface-level motivations for buying habits

Wants: Local products Needs: Health products; child-safe products

Pain points: Fragmented shopping experience

Psychographic/behavioral traits Observe persona traits that are representative of the customers’ behaviors (e.g. attitudes, buying patterns, etc.)

Psychographic: Detail-oriented, creature of habit

Behavioral: Shops at large grocery store twice a week, visits farmers market on Saturdays, buys organic products online

Activity: Build personas for your customers

2.1.8 2 hours

Input

  • Customer demographics and psychographics

Output

  • List of prioritized customer personas
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Info-Tech examples
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

Project Team

Instructions

  1. In 2-4 groups, list all the customer personas that need to be built. In doing so, consider the people who interact with your organization most often.
  2. Build a demographic profile for each customer persona. Include information such as age, geographic location, occupation, annual income, etc.
  3. Augment the persona with a psychographic profile of each customer. Consider the goals and objectives of each customer persona and how these might inform buyer behaviors.
  4. Introduce your group’s personas to the entire group, in a round-robin fashion, as if you are introducing your persona at a party.
  5. Summarize the personas in a persona map. Rank your personas according to importance and remove any duplicates.

Info-Tech Insight

For CXM, persona building is typically used for understanding the external customer; however, if you need to gain a better understanding of the organization’s internal customers (those who will be interacting with CXM applications), personas can also be built for this purpose. Examples of useful internal personas are sales managers, brand managers, customer service directors, etc.

Sample Persona Templates

Fred, 40

The Family Man

Post-secondary educated, white-collar professional, three children

Goals & Objectives

  • Maintain a stable secure lifestyle
  • Progress his career
  • Obtain a good future for his children

Behaviors

  • Manages household and finances
  • Stays actively involved in children’s activities and education
  • Seeks potential career development
  • Uses a cellphone and email frequently
  • Sometimes follows friends Facebook pages

Services of Interest

  • SFA, career counselling, job boards, day care, SHHS
  • Access to information via in-person, phone, online

Traits

General Literacy - High

Digital Literacy - Mid-High

Detail-Oriented - High

Willing to Try New Things - Mid-High

Motivated and Persistent - Mid-High

Time Flexible - Mid-High

Familiar With [Red.] - Mid

Access to [Red.] Offices - High

Access to Internet - High

Ashley, 35

The Tourist

Single, college educated, planning vacation in [redacted], interested in [redacted] job opportunities

Goals & Objectives

  • Relax after finishing a stressful job
  • Have adventures and try new things
  • Find a new job somewhere in Canada

Behaviors

  • Collects information about things to do in [redacted]
  • Collects information about life in [redacted]
  • Investigates and follows up on potential job opportunities
  • Uses multiple social media to keep in touch with friends
  • Shops online frequently

Services of Interest

  • SFA, job search, road conditions, ferry schedules, hospital, police station, DL requirements, vehicle rental
  • Access to information via in-person, phone, website, SMS, email, social media

Traits

General Literacy - Mid

Digital Literacy - High

Detail-Oriented - Mid

Willing to Try New Things - High

Motivated and Persistent - Mid

Time Flexible - Mid-High

Familiar With [Red.] - Low

Access to [Red.] Offices - Low

Access to Internet - High

Bill, 25

The Single Parent

15-year resident of [redacted], high school education, waiter, recently divorced, two children

Goals & Objectives

  • Improve his career options so he can support his family
  • Find an affordable place to live
  • Be a good parent
  • Work through remaining divorce issues

Behaviors

  • Tries to get training or experience to improve his career
  • Stays actively involved in his children’s activities
  • Looks for resources and supports to resolve divorce issues
  • Has a cellphone and uses the internet occasionally

Services of Interest

  • Child care, housing authority, legal aid, parenting resources
  • Access to information via in person, word-of mouth, online, phone, email

Traits

General Literacy - Mid

Digital Literacy - Mid-Low

Detail-Oriented - Mid-Low

Willing to Try New Things - Mid

Motivated and Persistent - High

Time Flexible - Mid

Familiar With [Red.] - Mid-High

Access to [Red.] Offices - High

Access to Internet - High

Marie, 19

The Regional Youth

Single, [redacted] resident, high school graduate

Goals & Objectives

  • Get a good job
  • Maintain ties to family and community

Behaviors

  • Looking for work
  • Gathering information about long-term career choices
  • Trying to get the training or experience that can help her develop a career
  • Staying with her parents until she can get established
  • Has a new cellphone and is learning how to use it
  • Plays videogames and uses the internet at least weekly

Services of Interest

  • Job search, career counselling
  • Access to information via in-person, online, phone, email, web applications

Traits

General Literacy - Mid

Digital Literacy - Mid

Detail-Oriented - Mid-Low

Willing to Try New Things - Mid-High

Motivated and Persistent - Mid-Low

Time Flexible - High

Familiar With [Red.] - Mid-Low

Access to [Red.] Offices - Mid-Low

Access to Internet - Mid

Build key scenarios for each persona to extract strategic requirements for your CXM application portfolio

A scenario is a story or narrative that helps explore the set of interactions that a customer has with an organization. Scenario mapping will help parse requirements used to design the CXM application portfolio.

A Good Scenario…

  • Describes specific task(s) that need to be accomplished
  • Describes user goals and motivations
  • Describes interactions with a compelling but not overwhelming amount of detail
  • Can be rough, as long as it provokes ideas and discussion

Scenarios Are Used To…

  • Provide a shared understanding about what a user might want to do, and how they might want to do it
  • Help construct the sequence of events that are necessary to address in your user interface(s)

To Create Good Scenarios…

  • Keep scenarios high level, not granular in nature
  • Identify as many scenarios as possible. If you’re time constrained, try to develop 2-3 key scenarios per persona
  • Sketch each scenario out so that stakeholders understand the goal of the scenario

Activity: Build scenarios for each persona and extract strategic requirements for the CXM strategy

2.1.9 1.5 hours

Input

  • Customer personas (output of Activity 2.1.5)

Output

  • CX scenario maps
  • Strategic CXM requirements
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. For each customer persona created in Activity 2.1.5, build a scenario. Choose and differentiate scenarios based on the customer goal of each scenario (e.g. make online purchase, seek customer support, etc.).
  2. Think through the narrative of how a customer interacts with your organization, at all points throughout the scenario. List each step in the interaction in a sequential order to form a scenario journey.
  3. Examine each step in the scenario and brainstorm strategic requirements that will be needed to support the customer’s use of technology throughout the scenario.
  4. Repeat steps 1-3 for each persona. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Scenario Map

Persona Name: Brand Loyal Linda

Scenario Goal: File a complaint about in-store customer service

Look up “[Store Name] customer service” on public web. →Reach customer support landing page. →Receive proactive notification prompt for online chat with CSR. →Initiate conversation: provide order #. →CSR receives order context and information. →Customer articulates problem, CSR consults knowledgebase. →Discount on next purchase offered. →Send email with discount code to Brand Loyal Linda.

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

  • To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.
  • Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team onsite at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.
  • Contact your account manager (www.infotech.com/account), or email Workshops@InfoTech.com for more information.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

2.1.1; 2.1.2; 2.1.3; 2.1.4 - Create a CXM operating model

An analyst will facilitate a discussion to identify what impacts your CXM strategy and how to align it to your corporate strategy. The discussion will take different perspectives into consideration and look at organizational drivers, external environmental factors, as well as internal barriers and enablers.

2.1.5 Conduct a competitive analysis

Calling on their depth of expertise in working with a broad spectrum of organizations, our facilitator will help you work through a structured, systematic evaluation of competitors’ actions when it comes to CXM.

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

2.1.6; 2.1.7 - Conduct a PEST analysis

The facilitator will use guided conversation to target each quadrant of the PEST analysis and help your organization fully enumerate political, economic, social, and technological trends that will influence your CXM strategy. Our analysts are deeply familiar with macroenvironmental trends and can provide expert advice in identifying areas of concern in the PEST and drawing strategic requirements as implications.

2.1.8; 2.1.9 - Build customer personas and subsequent persona scenarios

Drawing on the preceding exercises as inputs, the facilitator will help the team create and refine personas, create respective customer interaction scenarios, and parse strategic requirements to support your technology portfolio for CXM.

Step 2.2: Assess the Current State of CXM

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities:

  • Conduct a SWOT analysis and extract strategic requirements
  • Inventory existing CXM applications and assess end-user usage and satisfaction
  • Conduct a VRIO analysis and extract strategic requirements

Outcomes:

  • SWOT analysis
  • VRIO analysis
  • Current state application portfolio
  • Strategic requirements

Conduct a SWOT analysis to prepare for creating your CXM strategy

A SWOT analysis is a structured planning method that evaluates the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats involved in a project.

Strengths - Strengths describe the positive attributes that are within your control and internal to your organization (i.e. what do you do better than anyone else?)

Weaknesses - Weaknesses are internal aspects of your business that place you at a competitive disadvantage; think of what you need to enhance to compete with your top competitor.

Opportunities - Opportunities are external factors the project can capitalize on. Think of them as factors that represent reasons your business is likely to prosper.

Threats - Threats are external factors that could jeopardize the project. While you may not have control over these, you will benefit from having contingency plans to address them if they occur.

Info-Tech Insight

When evaluating weaknesses of your current CXM strategy, ensure that you’re taking into account not just existing applications and business processes, but also potential deficits in your organization’s channel strategy and go-to-market messaging.

Activity: Conduct a SWOT analysis

2.2.1 30 minutes

Input

  • CXM strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats

Output

  • Completed SWOT analysis

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Identify your current strengths and weaknesses in managing the customer experience. Consider marketing, sales, and customer service aspects of the CX.
  2. Identify any opportunities to take advantage of and threats to mitigate.

Example: SWOT Analysis

Strengths

  • Strong customer service model via telephony

Weaknesses

  • Customer service inaccessible in real-time through website or mobile application

Opportunities

  • Leverage customer intelligence to measure ongoing customer satisfaction

Threats

  • Lack of understanding of customer interaction platforms by staff could hinder adoption

Activity: Translate your SWOT analysis into a list of requirements to be addressed

2.2.2 30 minutes

Input

  • SWOT Analysis conducted in Activity 2.2.1.

Output

  • Strategic CXM requirements
  • CXM Stakeholder Presentation Template

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

For each SWOT quadrant:

  1. Document the point and relate it to a goal.
  2. For each point, identify CXM requirements.
  3. Sort goals and requirements to eliminate duplicates.
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Parsing Requirements from SWOT Analysis

Weakness: Customer service inaccessible in real-time through website or mobile application.

Goal: Increase the ubiquity of access to customer service knowledgebase and agents through a web portal or mobile application.

Strategic Requirement: Provide a live chat portal that matches the customer with the next available and qualified agent.

Inventory your current CXM application portfolio

Applications are the bedrock of technology enablement for CXM. Review your current application portfolio to identify what is working well and what isn’t.

Understand Your CXM Application Portfolio With a Four-Step Approach

Build the CXM Application Inventory →Assess Usage and Satisfaction →Map to Business Processes and Determine Dependencies →Determine Grow/Maintain/ Retire for Each Application

When assessing the CXM applications portfolio, do not cast your net too narrowly; while CRM and MMS applications are often top of mind, applications for digital asset management and social media management are also instrumental for ensuring a well-integrated CX.

Identify dependencies (either technical or licensing) between applications. This dependency tracing will come into play when deciding which applications should be grown (invested in), which applications should be maintained (held static), and which applications should be retired (divested).

Info-Tech Insight

Shadow IT is prominent here! When building your application inventory, ensure you involve Marketing, Sales, and Service to identify any “unofficial” SaaS applications that are being used for CXM. Many organizations fail to take a systematic view of their CXM application portfolio beyond maintaining a rough inventory. To assess the current state of alignment, you must build the application inventory and assess satisfaction metrics.

Understand which of your organization’s existing enterprise applications enable CXM

Review the major enterprise applications in your organization that enable CXM and align your requirements to these applications (net-new or existing). Identify points of integration to capture the big picture.

The image shows a graphic titled Example: Integration of CRM, SMMP, and ERP. It is a flow chart, with icons defined by a legend on the right side of the image

Info-Tech Insight

When assessing the current application portfolio that supports CXM, the tendency will be to focus on the applications under the CXM umbrella, relating mostly to marketing, sales, and customer service. Be sure to include systems that act as input to, or benefit due to outputs from, CRM or similar applications. Examples of these systems are ERP systems, ECM (e.g. SharePoint) applications, and more.

Assess CXM application usage and satisfaction

Having a portfolio but no contextual data will not give you a full understanding of the current state. The next step is to thoroughly assess usage patterns as well as IT, management, and end-user satisfaction with each application.

Example: Application Usage & Satisfaction Assessment

Application Name Level of Usage IT Satisfaction Management Satisfaction End-User Satisfaction Potential Business Impact
CRM (e.g. Salesforce) Medium High Medium Medium High
CRM (e.g. Salesforce) Low Medium Medium High Medium
... ... ... ... ... ...

Info-Tech Insight

When evaluating satisfaction with any application, be sure to consult all stakeholders who come into contact with the application or depend on its output. Consider criteria such as ease of use, completeness of information, operational efficiency, data accuracy, etc.

Use Info-Tech’s Application Portfolio Assessment to gather end-user feedback on existing CXM applications

2.2.3 Application Portfolio Assessment: End-User Feedback

Info-Tech’s Application Portfolio Assessment: End-User Feedback diagnostic is a low-effort, high-impact program that will give you detailed report cards on end-user satisfaction with an application. Use these insights to identify problems, develop action plans for improvement, and determine key participants.

Application Portfolio Assessment: End-User Feedback is an 18-question survey that provides valuable insights on user satisfaction with an application by:

  • Performing a general assessment of the application portfolio that provides a full view of the effectiveness, criticality, and prevalence of all relevant applications.
  • Measuring individual application performance with open-ended user feedback surveys about the application, organized by department to simplify problem resolution.
  • Providing targeted department feedback to identify end-user satisfaction and focus improvements on the right group or line of business.

INFO-TECH DIAGNOSTIC

Activity: Inventory your CXM applications, and assess application usage and satisfaction

2.2.4 1 hour

Input

  • List of CXM applications

Output

  • Complete inventory of CXM applications
  • CXM Stakeholder Presentation Template

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. List all existing applications that support the creation, management, and delivery of your customer experience.
  2. Identify which processes each application supports (e.g. content deployment, analytics, service delivery, etc.).
  3. Identify technical or licensing dependencies (e.g. data models).
  4. Assess the level of application usage by IT, management, and internal users (high/medium/low).
  5. Assess the satisfaction with and performance of each application according to IT, management, and internal users (high/medium/low). Use the Info-Tech Diagnostic to assist.

Example: CXM Application Inventory

Application Name Deployed Date Processes Supported Technical and Licensing Dependencies
Salesforce June 2018 Customer relationship management XXX
Hootsuite April 2019 Social media listening XXX
... ... ... ...

Conduct a VRIO analysis to identify core competencies for CXM applications

A VRIO analysis evaluates the ability of internal resources and capabilities to sustain a competitive advantage by evaluating dimensions of value, rarity, imitability, and organization. For critical applications like your CRM platform, use a VRIO analysis to determine their value.

Is the resource or capability valuable in exploiting an opportunity or neutralizing a threat? Is the resource or capability rare in the sense that few of your competitors have a similar capability? Is the resource or capability costly to imitate or replicate? Is the organization organized enough to leverage and capture value from the resource or capability?
NO COMPETITIVE DISADVANTAGE
YES NO→ COMPETITIVE EQUALITY/PARITY
YES YES NO→ TEMPORARY COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
YES YES YES NO→ UNUSED COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
YES YES YES YES LONG-TERM COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

(Strategic Management Insight, 2013)

Activity: Conduct a VRIO analysis on your existing application portfolio

2.2.5 30 minutes

Input

  • Inventory of existing CXM applications (output of Activity 2.2.4)

Output

  • Completed VRIO analysis
  • Strategic CXM requirements
  • CXM Stakeholder Presentation Template

Materials

  • VRIO Analysis model
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Evaluate each CXM application inventoried in Activity 2.2.4 by answering the four VRIO questions in sequential order. Do not proceed to the following question if “no” is answered at any point.
  2. Record the results. The state of your organization’s competitive advantage, based on each resource/capability, will be determined based on the number of questions with a “yes” answer. For example, if all four questions are answered positively, then your organization is considered to have a long-term competitive advantage.
  3. Document your outputs in the CXM Stakeholder Presentation Template.

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide your through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

2.2.1; 2.2.2 Conduct a SWOT Analysis

Our facilitator will use a small-team approach to delve deeply into each area, identifying enablers (strengths and opportunities) and challenges (weaknesses and threats) relating to the CXM strategy.

2.2.3; 2.2.4 Inventory your CXM applications, and assess usage and satisfaction

Working with your core team, the facilitator will assist with building a comprehensive inventory of CXM applications that are currently in use and with identifying adjacent systems that need to be identified for integration purposes. The facilitator will work to identify high and low performing applications and analyze this data with the team during the workshop exercise.

2.2.5 Conduct a VRIO analysis

The facilitator will take you through a VRIO analysis to identify which of your internal technological competencies ensure, or can be leveraged to ensure, your competitiveness in the CXM market.

Step 2.3: Create an Application Portfolio

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities

  • Shortlist and prioritize business processes for improvement and reengineering
  • Map current CXM processes
  • Identify business process owners and assign job responsibilities
  • Identify user interaction channels to extract strategic requirements
  • Aggregate and develop strategic requirements
  • Determine gaps in current and future state processes
  • Build the CXM application portfolio

Outcomes

CXM application portfolio map

  • Shortlist of relevant business processes
  • Current state map
  • Business process ownership assignment
  • Channel map
  • Complete list of strategic requirements

Understand business process mapping to draft strategy requirements for marketing, sales, and customer service

The interaction between sales, marketing, and customer service is very process-centric. Rethink sales and customer-centric workflows and map the desired workflow, imbedding the improved/reengineered process into the requirements.

Using BPM to Capture Strategic Requirements

Business process modeling facilitates the collaboration between the business and IT, recording the sequence of events, tasks performed, who performed them, and the levels of interaction with the various supporting applications.

By identifying the events and decision points in the process and overlaying the people that perform the functions, the data being interacted with, and the technologies that support them, organizations are better positioned to identify gaps that need to be bridged.

Encourage the analysis by compiling an inventory of business processes that support customer-facing operations that are relevant to achieving the overall organizational strategies.

Outcomes

  • Operational effectiveness
  • Identification, implementation, and maintenance of reusable enterprise applications
  • Identification of gaps that can be addressed by acquisition of additional applications or process improvement/ reengineering

INFO-TECH OPPORTUNITY

Refer to Info-Tech’s Create a Comprehensive BPM Strategy for Successful Process Automation blueprint for further assistance in taking a BPM approach to your sales-IT alignment.

Leverage the APQC framework to help define your inventory of sales, marketing, and service processes

APQC’s Process Classification Framework is a taxonomy of cross-functional business processes intended to allow the objective comparison of organizational performance within and among organizations.

OPERATING PROCESSES
1.0 Develop Vision and Strategy 2.0 Develop and Manage Products and Services 3.0 Market and Sell Products and Services 4.0 Deliver Products and Services 5.0 Manage Customer Service
MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORT SERVICES
6.0 Develop and Manage Human Capital
7.0 Manage Information Technology
8.0 Manage Financial Resources
9.0 Acquire, Construct, and Manage Assets
10.0 Manage Enterprise Risk, Compliance, and Resiliency
11.0 Manage External Relationships
12.0 Develop and Manage Business Capabilities

(APQC, 2011)

MORE ABOUT APQC

  • APQC serves as a high-level, industry-neutral enterprise model that allows organizations to see activities from a cross-industry process perspective.
  • Sales processes have been provided up to Level 3 of the APQC framework.
  • The APQC Framework can be accessed through APQC’s Process Classification Framework.
  • Note: The framework does not list all processes within a specific organization, nor are the processes that are listed in the framework present in every organization.

Understand APQC’s “Market and Sell Products and Services” framework

3.0 Market and Sell Products

3.1 Understand markets, customers, and capabilities

  • 3.1.1 Perform customer and market intelligence analysis
  • 3.1.2 Evaluate and prioritize market opportunities

3.2 Develop marketing strategy

  • 3.2.1 Define offering and customer value proposition
  • 3.2.2 Define pricing strategy to align to value proposition
  • 3.2.3 Define and manage channel strategy

3.3 Develop sales strategy

  • 3.3.1 Develop sales forecast
  • 3.3.2 Develop sales partner/alliance relationships
  • 3.3.3 Establish overall sales budgets
  • 3.3.4 Establish sales goals and measures
  • 3.3.5 Establish customer management measures

3.4 Develop and manage marketing plans

  • 3.4.1 Establish goals, objectives, and metrics by products by channels/segments
  • 3.4.2 Establish marketing budgets
  • 3.4.3 Develop and manage media
  • 3.4.4 Develop and manage pricing
  • 3.4.5 Develop and manage promotional activities
  • 3.4.6 Track customer management measures
  • 3.4.7 Develop and manage packaging strategy

3.5 Develop and manage sales plans

  • 3.5.1 Generate leads
  • 3.5.2 Manage customers and accounts
  • 3.5.3 Manage customer sales
  • 3.5.4 Manage sales orders
  • 3.5.5 Manage sales force
  • 3.5.6 Manage sales partners and alliances

Understand APQC’s “Manage Customer Service” framework

5.0 Manage Customer Service

5.1 Develop customer care/customer service strategy

  • 5.1.1 Develop customer service segmentation
    • 5.1.1.1 Analyze existing customers
    • 5.1.1.2 Analyze feedback of customer needs
  • 5.1.2 Define customer service policies and procedures
  • 5.1.3 Establish service levels for customers

5.2 Plan and manage customer service operations

  • 5.2.1 Plan and manage customer service work force
    • 5.2.1.1 Forecast volume of customer service contacts
    • 5.2.1.2 Schedule customer service work force
    • 5.2.1.3 Track work force utilization
    • 5.2.1.4 Monitor and evaluate quality of customer interactions with customer service representatives

5.2 Plan and 5.2.3.1 Receive customer complaints 5.2.3.2 Route customer complaints 5.2.3.3 Resolve customer complaints 5.2.3.4 Respond to customer complaints manage customer service operations

  • 5.2.2 Manage customer service requests/inquiries
    • 5.2.2.1 Receive customer requests/inquiries
    • 5.2.2.2 Route customer requests/inquiries
    • 5.2.2.3 Respond to customer requests/inquiries
  • 5.2.3 Manage customer complaints
    • 5.2.3.1 Receive customer complaints
    • 5.2.3.2 Route customer complaints
    • 5.2.3.3 Resolve customer complaints
    • 5.2.3.4 Respond to customer complaints

Leverage the APQC framework to inventory processes

The APQC framework provides levels 1 through 3 for the “Market and Sell Products and Services” framework. Level 4 processes and beyond will need to be defined by your organization as they are more granular (represent the task level) and are often industry-specific.

Level 1 – Category - 1.0 Develop vision and strategy (10002)

Represents the highest level of process in the enterprise, such as manage customer service, supply chain, financial organization, and human resources.

Level 2 – Process Group - 1.1 Define the business concept and long-term vision (10014)

Indicates the next level of processes and represents a group of processes. Examples include perform after sales repairs, procurement, accounts payable, recruit/source, and develop sales strategy.

Level 3 – Process - 1.1.1 Assess the external environment (10017)

A series of interrelated activities that convert input into results (outputs); processes consume resources and require standards for repeatable performance; and processes respond to control systems that direct quality, rate, and cost of performance.

Level 4 – Activity - 1.1.1.1 Analyze and evaluate competition (10021)

Indicates key events performed when executing a process. Examples of activities include receive customer requests, resolve customer complaints, and negotiate purchasing contracts.

Level 5 – Task - 12.2.3.1.1 Identify project requirements and objectives (11117)

Tasks represent the next level of hierarchical decomposition after activities. Tasks are generally much more fine grained and may vary widely across industries. Examples include create business case and obtain funding, and design recognition and reward approaches.

Info-Tech Insight

Define the Level 3 processes in the context of your organization. When creating a CXM strategy, concern yourself with the interrelatedness of processes across existing departmental silos (e.g. marketing, sales, customer service). Reserve the analysis of activities (Level 4) and tasks (Level 3) for granular work initiatives involved in the implementation of applications.

Use Info-Tech’s CXM Business Process Shortlisting Tool to prioritize processes for improvement

2.3.1 CXM Business Process Shortlisting Tool

The CXM Business Process Shortlisting Tool can help you define which marketing, sales, and service processes you should focus on.

Working in concert with stakeholders from the appropriate departments, complete the short questionnaire.

Based on validated responses, the tool will highlight processes of strategic importance to your organization.

These processes can then be mapped, with requirements extracted and used to build the CXM application portfolio.

INFO-TECH DELIVERABLE

The image shows a screenshot of the Prioritize Your Business Processes for Customer Experience Management document, with sample information filled in.

Activity: Define your organization’s top-level processes for reengineering and improvement

2.3.2 1 hour

Input

  • Shortlist business processes relating to customer experience (output of Tool 2.3.1)

Output

  • Prioritized list of top-level business processes by department

Materials

  • APQC Framework
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Inventory all business processes relating to customer experience.
  2. Customize the impacted business units and factor weightings on the scorecard below to reflect the structure and priorities of your organization.
  3. Using the scorecard, identify all processes essential to your customer experience. The scorecard is designed to determine which processes to focus on and to help you understand the impact of the scrutinized process on the different customer-centric groups across the organization.

The image shows a chart with the headings Factor, Check If Yes, repeated. The chart lists various factors, and the Check if Yes columns are left blank.

This image shows a chart with the headings Factor, Weights, and Scores. It lists factors, and the rest of the chart is blank.

Current legend for Weights and Scores

F – Finance

H – Human Resources

I – IT

L – Legal

M – Marketing

BU1 – Business Unit 1

BU2 – Business Unit 2

Activity: Map top-level business processes to extract strategic requirements for the CXM application portfolio

2.3.3 45 minutes

Input

  • Prioritized list of top-level business processes (output of Activity 2.3.2)

Output

  • Current state process maps
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • APQC Framework
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers
  • Sticky notes

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. List all prioritized business processes, as identified in Activity 2.3.2. Map your processes in enough detail to capture all relevant activities and system touchpoints, using the legend included in the example. Focus on Level 3 processes, as explained in the APQC framework.
  2. Record all of the major process steps on sticky notes. Arrange the sticky notes in sequential order.
  3. On a set of different colored sticky notes, record all of the systems that enable the process. Map these system touchpoints to the process steps.
  4. Draw arrows in between the steps to represent manual entry or automation.
  5. Identify effectiveness and gaps in existing processes to determine process technology requirements.
  6. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

INFO-TECH OPPORTUNITY

Refer to Info-Tech’s Create a Comprehensive BPM Strategy for Successful Process Automation blueprint for further assistance in taking a BPM approach to your sales-IT alignment.

Info-Tech Insight

Analysis of the current state is important in the context of gap analysis. It aids in understanding the discrepancies between your baseline and the future state vision, and ensures that these gaps are documented as part of the overall requirements.

Example: map your current CXM processes to parse strategic requirements (customer acquisition)

The image shows an example of a CXM process map, which is formatted as a flow chart, with a legend at the bottom.

Activity: Extract requirements from your top-level business processes

2.3.4 30 minutes

Input

  • Current state process maps (output of Activity 2.3.3)

Output

  • Requirements for future state mapping

Materials

  • Info-Tech examples
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Discuss the current state of priority business processes, as mapped in Activity 2.3.3.
  2. Extract process requirements for business process improvement by asking the following questions:
  • What is the input?
  • What is the output?
  • What are the underlying risks and how can they be mitigated?
  • What conditions should be met to mitigate or eliminate each risk?
  • What are the improvement opportunities?
  • What conditions should be met to enable these opportunities?
  1. Break business requirements into functional and non-functional requirements, as outlined on this slide.

Info-Tech Insight

The business and IT should work together to evaluate the current state of business processes and the business requirements necessary to support these processes. Develop a full view of organizational needs while still obtaining the level of detail required to make informed decisions about technology.

Establish process owners for each top-level process

Identify the owners of the business processes being evaluated to extract requirements. Process owners will be able to inform business process improvement and assume accountability for reengineered or net-new processes going forward.

Process Owner Responsibilities

Process ownership ensures support, accountability, and governance for CXM and its supporting processes. Process owners must be able to negotiate with business users and other key stakeholders to drive efficiencies within their own process. The process owner must execute tactical process changes and continually optimize the process.

Responsibilities include the following:

  • Inform business process improvement
  • Introduce KPIs and metrics
  • Monitor the success of the process
  • Present process findings to key stakeholders within the organization
  • Develop policies and procedures for the process
  • Implement new methods to manage the process

Info-Tech Insight

Identify the owners of existing processes early so you understand who needs to be involved in process improvement and reengineering. Once implemented, CXM applications are likely to undergo a series of changes. Unstructured data will multiply, the number of users may increase, administrators may change, and functionality could become obsolete. Should business processes be merged or drastically changed, process ownership can be reallocated during CXM implementation. Make sure you have the right roles in place to avoid inefficient processes and poor data quality.

Use Info-Tech’s Process Owner Assignment Guide to aid you in choosing the right candidates

2.3.5 Process Owner Assignment Guide

The Process Owner Assignment Guide will ensure you are taking the appropriate steps to identify process owners for existing and net-new processes created within the scope of the CXM strategy.

The steps in the document will help with important considerations such as key requirements and responsibilities.

Sections of the document:

  1. Define responsibilities and level of commitment
  2. Define job requirements
  3. Receive referrals
  4. Hold formal interviews
  5. Determine performance metrics

INFO-TECH DELIVERABLE

Activity: Assign business process owners and identify job responsibilities

2.3.6 30 minutes

Input

  • Current state map (output of Activity 2.3.3)

Output

  • Process owners assigned
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Using Info-Tech’s Process Owner Assignment Guide, assign process owners for each process mapped out in Activity 2.3.3. To assist in doing so, answer the following questions
    • What is the level of commitment expected from each process owner?
    • How will the process owner role be tied to a formal performance appraisal?
    • What metrics can be assigned?
    • How much work will be required to train process owners?
    • Is there support staff available to assist process owners?
  2. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Choose the channels that will make your target customers happy – and ensure they’re supported by CXM applications

Traditional Channels

Face-to-Face is efficient and has a positive personalized aspect that many customers desire, be it for sales or customer service.

Telephony (or IVR) has been a mainstay of customer interaction for decades. While not fading, it must be used alongside newer channels.

Postal used to be employed extensively for all domains, but is now used predominantly for e-commerce order fulfillment.

Web 1.0 Channels

Email is an asynchronous interaction channel still preferred by many customers. Email gives organizations flexibility with queuing.

Live Chat is a way for clients to avoid long call center wait times and receive a solution from a quick chat with a service rep.

Web Portals permit transactions for sales and customer service from a central interface. They are a must-have for any large company.

Web 2.0 Channels

Social Media consists of many individual services (like Facebook or Twitter). Social channels are exploding in consumer popularity.

HTML5 Mobile Access allows customers to access resources from their personal device through its integrated web browser.

Dedicated Mobile Apps allow customers to access resources through a dedicated mobile application (e.g. iOS, Android).

Info-Tech Insight

Your channel selections should be driven by customer personas and scenarios. For example, social media may be extensively employed by some persona types (i.e. Millennials) but see limited adoption in other demographics or use cases (i.e. B2B).

Activity: Extract requirements from your channel map

2.3.7 30 minutes

Input

  • Current state process maps (output of Activity 2.3.3)

Output

  • Channel map
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Info-Tech examples
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Inventory which customer channels are currently used by each department.
  2. Speak with the department heads for Marketing, Sales, and Customer Service and discuss future channel usage. Identify any channels that will be eliminated or added.
  3. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Business Unit Channel Use Survey

Marketing Sales Customer Service
Current Used? Future Use? Current Used? Future Use? Current Used? Future Use?
Email Yes Yes No No No No
Direct Mail Yes No No No No No
Phone No No Yes Yes Yes Yes
In-Person No No Yes Yes Yes No
Website Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Social Channels No Yes Yes Yes No Yes

Bring it together: amalgamate your strategic requirements for CXM technology enablement

Discovering your organizational requirements is vital for choosing the right business-enabling initiative, technology, and success metrics. Sorting the requirements by marketing, sales, and service is a prudent mechanism for clarification.

Strategic Requirements: Marketing

Definition: High-level requirements that will support marketing functions within CXM.

Examples

  • Develop a native mobile application while also ensuring that resources for your web presence are built with responsive design interface.
  • Consolidate workflows related to content creation to publish all brand marketing from one source of truth.
  • Augment traditional web content delivery by providing additional functionality such as omnichannel engagement, e-commerce, dynamic personalization, and social media functionality.

Strategic Requirements: Sales

Definition: High-level requirements that will support sales functions within CXM.

Examples

  • Implement a system that reduces data errors and increases sales force efficiency by automating lead management workflows.
  • Achieve end-to-end visibility of the sales process by integrating the CRM, inventory, and order processing and shipping system.
  • Track sales force success by incorporating sales KPIs with real-time business intelligence feeds.

Strategic Requirements: Customer Service

Definition: High-level requirements that will support customer service functions within CXM.

Examples

  • Provide a live chat portal that connects the customer, in real time, with the next available and qualified agent.
  • Bridge the gap between the source of truth for sales with customer service suites to ensure a consistent, end-to-end customer experience from acquisition to customer engagement and retention.
  • Use customer intelligence to track customer journeys in order to best understand and resolve customer complaints.

Activity: Consolidate your strategic requirements for the CXM application portfolio

2.3.8 30 minutes

Input

  • Strategic CXM requirements (outputs of Activities 2.1.5, 2.1.6, and 2.2.2)

Output

  • Aggregated strategic CXM requirements
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Aggregate strategic CXM requirements that have been gathered thus far in Activities 2.1.5, 2.1.6, and 2.2.2, 2.3.5, and 2.3.7.
  2. Identify and rectify any obvious gaps in the existing set of strategic CXM requirements. To do so, consider the overall corporate and CXM strategy: are there any objectives that have not been addressed in the requirements gathering process?
  3. De-duplicate the list. Prioritize the aggregated/augmented list of CXM requirements as “high/critical,” “medium/important,” or “low/desirable.” This will help manage the relative importance and urgency of different requirements to itemize respective initiatives, resources, and the time in which they need to be addressed. In completing the prioritization of requirements, consider the following:
    • Requirements prioritization must be completed in collaboration with all key stakeholders (across the business and IT). Stakeholders must ask themselves:
      • What are the consequences to the business objectives if this requirement is omitted?
      • Is there an existing system or manual process/workaround that could compensate for it?
      • What business risk is being introduced if a particular requirement cannot be implemented right away?
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategic Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Info-Tech Insight

Strategic CXM requirements will be used to prioritize specific initiatives for CXM technology enablement and application rollout. Ensure that IT, the business, and executive management are all aligned on a consistent and agreed upon set of initiatives.

Burberry digitizes the retail CX with real-time computing to bring consumers back to the physical storefront

CASE STUDY

Industry Consumer Goods, Clothing

Source Retail Congress, 2017

Burberry London

Situation

Internally, Burberry invested in organizational alignment and sales force brand engagement. The more the sales associate knew about the brand engagement and technology-enabled strategy, the better the store’s performance. Before the efforts went to building relationships with customers, Burberry built engagement with employees.

Burberry embraced “omnichannel,” the hottest buzzword in retailing to provide consumers the most immersive and intuitive brand experience within the store.

Technology Strategy

RFID tags were attached to products to trigger interactive videos on the store’s screens in the common areas or in a fitting room. Consumers are to have instant access to relevant product combinations, ranging from craftsmanship information to catwalk looks. This is equivalent to the rich, immediate information consumers have grown to expect from the online shopping experience.

Another layer of Burberry’s added capabilities includes in-memory-based analytics to gather and analyze data in real-time to better understand customers’ desires. Burberry builds customer profiles based on what items the shoppers try on from the RFID-tagged garments. Although this requires customer privacy consent, customers are willing to provide personal information to trusted brands.

This program, called “Customer 360,” assisted sales associates in providing data-driven shopping experiences that invite customers to digitally share their buying history and preferences via their tablet devices. As the data is stored in Burberry’s customer data warehouse and accessed through an application such as CRM, it is able to arm sales associates with personal fashion advice on the spot.

Lastly, the customer data warehouse/CRM application is linked to Burberry’s ERP system and other custom applications in a cloud environment to achieve real-time inventory visibility and fulfillment.

Burberry digitizes the retail CX with real-time computing to bring consumers back to the physical storefront (cont'd)

CASE STUDY

Industry Consumer Goods, Clothing

Source Retail Congress, 2017

Burberry London

Situation

Internally, Burberry invested in organizational alignment and sales force brand engagement. The more the sales associate knew about the brand engagement and technology-enabled strategy, the better the store’s performance. Before the efforts went to building relationships with customers, Burberry built engagement with employees.

Burberry embraced “omnichannel,” the hottest buzzword in retailing to provide consumers the most immersive and intuitive brand experience within the store.

The Results

Burberry achieved one of the most personalized retail shopping experiences. Immediate personal fashion advice using customer data is only one component of the experience. Not only are historic purchases and preference data analyzed, a customer’s social media posts and fashion industry trend data is proactively incorporated into the interactions between the sales associate and the customer.

Burberry achieved CEO Angela Ahrendts’ vision of “Burberry World,” in which the brand experience is seamlessly integrated across channels, devices, retail locations, products, and services.

The organizational alignment between Sales, Marketing, and IT empowered employees to bring the Burberry brand to life in unique ways that customers appreciated and were willing to advocate.

Burberry is now one of the most beloved and valuable luxury brands in the world. The brand tripled sales in five years, became one of the leading voices on trends, fashion, music, and beauty while redefining what top-tier customer experience should be both digitally and physically.

Leverage both core CRM suites and point solutions to create a comprehensive CXM application portfolio

The debate between best-of-breed point solutions versus comprehensive CRM suites is ongoing. There is no single best answer. In most cases, an effective portfolio will include both types of solutions.

  • When the CRM market first evolved, vendors took a heavy “module-centric” approach – offering basic suites with the option to add a number of individual modules. Over time, vendors began to offer suites with a high degree of out-of-the-box functionality. The market has now witnessed the rise of powerful point solutions for the individual business domains.
  • Point solutions augment, rather than supplant, the functionality of a CRM suite in the mid-market to large enterprise context. Point solutions do not offer the necessary spectrum of functionality to take the place of a unified CRM suite.
  • Point solutions enhance aspects of CRM. For example, most CRM vendors have yet to provide truly impressive social media capabilities. An organization seeking to dominate the social space should consider purchasing a social media management platform to address this deficit in their CRM ecosystem.

Customer Relationship Management (CRM)

Social Media Management Platform (SMMP)

Field Sales/Service Automation (FSA)

Marketing Management Suites

Sales Force Automation

Email Marketing Tools

Lead Management Automation (LMA)

Customer Service Management Suites

Customer Intelligence Systems

Don’t adopt multiple point solutions without a genuine need: choose domains most in need of more functionality

Some may find that the capabilities of a CRM suite are not enough to meet their specific requirements: supplementing a CRM suite with a targeted point solution can get the job done. A variety of CXM point solutions are designed to enhance your business processes and improve productivity.

Sales

Sales Force Automation: Automatically generates, qualifies, tracks, and contacts leads for sales representatives, minimizing time wasted on administrative duties.

Field Sales: Allows field reps to go through the entire sales cycle (from quote to invoice) while offsite.

Sales Compensation Management: Models, analyzes, and dispenses payouts to sales representatives.

Marketing

Social Media Management Platforms (SMMP): Manage and track multiple social media services, with extensive social data analysis and insight capabilities.

Email Marketing Bureaus: Conduct email marketing campaigns and mine results to effectively target customers.

Marketing Intelligence Systems: Perform in-depth searches on various data sources to create predictive models.

Service

Customer Service Management (CSM): Manages the customer support lifecycle with a comprehensive array of tools, usually above and beyond what’s in a CRM suite.

Customer Service Knowledge Management (CSKM): Advanced knowledgebase and resolution tools.

Field Service Automation (FSA): Manages customer support tickets, schedules work orders, tracks inventory and fleets, all on the go.

Info-Tech Insight

CRM and point solution integration is critical. A best-of-breed product that poorly integrates with your CRM suite compromises the value generated by the combined solution, such as a 360-degree customer view. Challenge point solution vendors to demonstrate integration capabilities with CRM packages.

Refer to your use cases to decide whether to add a dedicated point solution alongside your CRM suite

Know your end state and what kind of tool will get you there. Refer to your strategic requirements to evaluate CRM and point solution feature sets.

Standalone CRM Suite

Sales Conditions: Need selling and lead management capabilities for agents to perform the sales process, along with sales dashboards and statistics.

Marketing or Communication Conditions: Need basic campaign management and ability to refresh contact records with information from social networks.

Member Service Conditions: Need to keep basic customer records with multiple fields per record and basic channels such as email and telephony.

Add a Best-of-Breed or Point Solution

Environmental Conditions: An extensive customer base with many different interactions per customer along with industry specific or “niche” needs. Point solutions will benefit firms with deep needs in specific feature areas (e.g. social media or field service).

Sales Conditions: Lengthy sales process and account management requirements for assessing and managing opportunities – in a technically complex sales process.

Marketing Conditions: Need social media functionality for monitoring and social property management.

Customer Service Conditions: Need complex multi-channel service processes and/or need for best-of-breed knowledgebase and service content management.

Info-Tech Insight

The volume and complexity of both customers and interactions have a direct effect on when to employ just a CRM suite and when to supplement with a point solution. Check to see if your CRM suite can perform a specific business requirement before deciding to evaluate potential point solutions.

Use Info-Tech’s CXM Portfolio Designer to create an inventory of high-value customer interaction applications

2.3.9 CXM Portfolio Designer

The CXM Portfolio Designer features a set of questions geared toward understanding your needs for marketing, sales, and customer service enablement.

These results are scored and used to suggest a comprehensive solution-level set of enterprise applications for CXM that can drive your application portfolio and help you make investment decisions in different areas such as CRM, marketing management, and customer intelligence.

Sections of the tool:

  1. Introduction
  2. Customer Experience Management Questionnaire
  3. Business Unit Recommendations
  4. Enterprise-Level Recommendations

INFO-TECH DELIVERABLE

Understand the art of the possible and how emerging trends will affect your application portfolio (1)

Cloud

  • The emergence and maturation of cloud technologies has broken down the barriers of software adoption.
  • Cloud has enabled easy-to-implement distributed sales centers for enterprises with global or highly fragmented workforces.
  • Cloud offers the agility, scalability, and flexibility needed to accommodate dynamic, evolving customer requirements while minimizing resourcing strain on IT and sales organizations.
  • It is now easier for small to medium enterprises to acquire and implement advanced sales capabilities to compete against larger competitors in a business environment where the need for business agility is key.
  • Although cost and resource reduction is a prominent view of the impact of cloud computing, it is also seen as an agile way to innovate and deliver a product/service experience that customers are looking for – the key to competitive differentiation.

Mobile

  • Smartphones and other mobile devices were adopted faster than the worldwide web in the late 1990s, and the business and sales implications of widespread adoption cannot be ignored – mobile is changing how businesses operate.
    • Accenture’s Mobility Research Report states that 87% of companies in the study have been guided by a formal mobility strategy – either one that spans the enterprise or for specific business functions.
  • Mobile is now the first point of interaction with businesses. With this trend, gaining visibility into customer insights with mobile analytics is a top priority for organizations.
  • Enterprises need to develop and optimize mobile experiences for internal salespeople and customers alike as part of their sales strategy – use mobile to enable a competitive, differentiated sales force.
  • The use of mobile platforms by sales managers is becoming a norm. Sales enablement suites should support real-time performance metrics on mobile dashboards.

Understand the art of the possible and how emerging trends will affect your application portfolio (2)

Social

  • The rise of social networking brought customers together. Customers are now conversing with each other over a wide range of community channels that businesses neither own nor control.
    • The Power Shift: The use of social channels empowered customers to engage in real-time, unstructured conversations for the purpose of product/service evaluations. Those who are active in social environments come to wield considerable influence over the buying decisions of other prospects and customers.
  • Organizations need to identify the influencers and strategically engage them as well as developing an active presence in social communities that lead to sales.
  • Social media does have an impact on sales, both B2C and B2B. A study conducted in 2012 by Social Centered Selling states that 72.6% of sales people using social media as part of their sales process outperformed their peers and exceeded their quota 23% more often (see charts at right).

The image shows two bar graphs, the one on top titled Achieving Quota: 2010-2012 and the one below titled Exceeding Quota: 2010-2012.

(Social Centered Learning, n.d.)

Understand the art of the possible and how emerging trends will affect your application portfolio (3)

Internet of Things

  • Definition: The Internet of Things (IoT) is the network of physical objects accessed through the internet. These objects contain embedded technology to interact with internal states or the external environment.
  • Why is this interesting?
    • IoT will make it possible for everybody and everything to be connected at all times, processing information in real time. The result will be new ways of making business and sales decisions supported by the availability of information.
    • With ubiquitous connectivity, the current product design-centric view of consumers is changing to one of experience design that aims to characterize the customer relationship with a series of integrated interaction touchpoints.
    • The above change contributes to the shift in focus from experience and will mean further acceleration of the convergence of customer-centric business functions. IoT will blur the lines between marketing, sales, and customer service.
    • Products or systems linked to products are capable of self-operating, learning, updating, and correcting by analyzing real-time data.
    • Take for example, an inventory scale in a large warehouse connected to the company’s supply chain management (SCM) system. When a certain inventory weight threshold is reached due to outgoing shipments, the scale automatically sends out a purchase requisition to restock inventory levels to meet upcoming demand.
  • The IoT will eventually begin to transform existing business processes and force organizations to fundamentally rethink how they produce, operate, and service their customers.

The image shows a graphic titled The Connected Life by 2020, and shows a number of statistics on use of connected devices over time.

For categories covered by existing applications, determine the disposition for each app: grow it or cut it loose

Use the two-by-two matrix below to structure your optimal CXM application portfolio. For more help, refer to Info-Tech’s blueprint, Use Agile Application Rationalization Instead of Going Big Bang.

1

0

Richness of Functionality

INTEGRATE RETAIN
1
REPLACE REPLACE OR ENHANCE

0

Degree of Integration

Integrate: The application is functionally rich, so spend time and effort integrating it with other modules by building or enhancing interfaces.

Retain: The application satisfies both functionality and integration requirements, so it should be considered for retention.

Replace/Enhance: The module offers poor functionality but is well integrated with other modules. If enhancing for functionality is easy (e.g. through configuration or custom development), consider enhancement or replace it.

Replace: The application neither offers the functionality sought nor is it integrated with other modules, and thus should be considered for replacement.

Activity: Brainstorm the art of the possible, and build and finalize the CXM application portfolio

2.3.10 1-2 hours

Input

  • Process gaps identified (output of Activity 2.3.9)

Output

  • CXM application portfolio
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Review the complete list of strategic requirements identified in the preceding exercises, as well as business process maps.
  2. Identify which application would link to which process (e.g. customer acquisition, customer service resolution, etc.).
  3. Use Info-Tech’s CXM Portfolio Designer to create an inventory of high-value customer interaction applications.
  4. Define rationalization and investment areas.
  5. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Brainstorming the Art of the Possible

Application Gap Satisfied Related Process Number of Linked Requirements Do we have the system? Priority
LMA
  • Lead Generation
  • Social Lead Management
  • CRM Integration
Sales 8 No Business Critical
Customer Intelligence
  • Web Analytics
  • Customer Journey Tracking
Customer Service 6 Yes Business Enabling
... ... ... ... ... ...

Use Info-Tech’s comprehensive reports to make granular vendor selection decisions

Now that you have developed the CXM application portfolio and identified areas of new investment, you’re well positioned to execute specific vendor selection projects. After you have built out your initiatives roadmap in phase 3, the following reports provide in-depth vendor reviews, feature guides, and tools and templates to assist with selection and implementation.

Info-Tech Insight

Not all applications are created equally well for each use case. The vendor reports help you make informed procurement decisions by segmenting vendor capabilities among major use cases. The strategic requirements identified as part of this project should be used to select the use case that best fits your needs.

If you want additional support, have our analyst guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

2.3.2; 2.3.3 Shortlist and map the key top-level business processes

Based on experience working with organizations in similar verticals, the facilitator will help your team map out key sample workflows for marketing, sales, and customer service.

2.3.6 Create your strategic requirements for CXM

Drawing on the preceding exercises, the facilitator will work with the team to create a comprehensive list of strategic requirements that will be used to drive technology decisions and roadmap initiatives.

2.3.10 Create and finalize the CXM application portfolio

Using the strategic requirements gathered through internal, external, and technology analysis up to this point, a facilitator will assist you in assembling a categorical technology application portfolio to support CXM.

Step 2.4: Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities:

  • Develop a CXM integration map
  • Develop a mitigation plan for poor quality customer data
  • Create a framework for end-user adoption of CXM applications

Outcomes:

  • CXM application portfolio integration map
  • Data quality preservation plan
  • End-user adoption plan

Develop an integration map to specify which applications will interface with each other

Integration is paramount: your CXM application portfolio must work as a unified face to the customer. Create an integration map to reflect a system of record and the exchange of data.

  • CRM
    • ERP
    • Telephony Systems (IVR, CTI)
    • Directory Services
    • Email
    • Content Management
    • Point Solutions (SMMP, MMS)

The points of integration that you’ll need to establish must be based on the objectives and requirements that have informed the creation of the CXM application portfolio. For instance, achieving improved customer insights would necessitate a well-integrated portfolio with customer interaction point solutions, business intelligence tools, and customer data warehouses in order to draw the information necessary to build insight. To increase customer engagement, channel integration is a must (i.e. with robust links to unified communications solutions, email, and VoIP telephony systems).

Info-Tech Insight

If the CXM application portfolio is fragmented, it will be nearly impossible to build a cohesive view of the customer and deliver a consistent customer experience. Points of integration (POIs) are the junctions between the applications that make up the CXM portfolio. They are essential to creating value, particularly in customer insight-focused and omnichannel-focused deployments. Be sure to include enterprise applications that are not included in the CXM application portfolio. Popular systems to consider for POIs include billing, directory services, content management, and collaboration tools.

After identifying points of integration, profile them by business significance, complexity, and investment required

  • After enumerating points of integration between the CRM platform and other CXM applications and data sources, profile them by business significance and complexity required to determine a rank-ordering of priorities.
  • Points of integration that are of high business significance with low complexity are your must do’s – these are your quick wins that deliver maximum value without too much cost. This is typically the case when integrating a vendor-to-vendor solution with available native connectors.
  • On the opposite end of the spectrum are your POIs that will require extensive work to deliver but offer negligible value. These are your should not do’s – typically, these are niche requests for integration that will only benefit the workflows of a small (and low priority) group of end users. Only accommodate them if you have slack time and budget built into your implementation timeline.

The image shows a square matrix with Point of Integration Value Matrix in the centre. On the X-axis is Business Significance, and on the Y-axis is POI complexity. In the upper left quadrant is Should Not Do, upper right is Should Do, lower left is Could Do, and lower right is Must do.

"Find the absolute minimum number of ‘quick wins’ – the POIs you need from day one that are necessary to keep end users happy and deliver value." – Maria Cindric, Australian Catholic University Source: Interview

Activity: Develop a CXM application integration map

2.4.1 1 hour

Input

  • CXM application portfolio (output of Activity 2.3.10)

Output

  • CXM application portfolio integration map
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Sticky notes
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. On sticky notes, record the list of applications that comprise the CXM application portfolio (built in Activity 2.3.10) and all other relevant applications. Post the sticky notes on a whiteboard so you can visualize the portfolio.
  2. Discuss the key objectives and requirements that will drive the integration design of the CXM application portfolio.
  3. As deemed necessary by step 2, rearrange the sticky notes and draw connecting arrows between applications to reflect their integration. Allow the point of the arrow to indicate direction of data exchanges.
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Mapping the Integration of CXM Applications

The image shows several yellow rectangles with text in them, connected by arrows.

Plug the hole and bail the boat – plan to be preventative and corrective with customer data quality initiatives

Data quality is king: if your customer data is garbage in, it will be garbage out. Enable strategic CXM decision making with effective planning of data quality initiatives.

Identify and Eliminate Dead Weight

Poor data can originate in the firm’s system of record, which is typically the CRM system. Custom queries, stored procedures, or profiling tools can be used to assess the key problem areas.

Loose rules in the CRM system lead to records of no significant value in the database. Those rules need to be fixed, but if changes are made before the data is fixed, users could encounter database or application errors, which will reduce user confidence in the system.

  • Conduct a data flow analysis: map the path that data takes through the organization.
  • Use a mass cleanup to identify and destroy dead weight data. Merge duplicates either manually or with the aid of software tools. Delete incomplete data, taking care to reassign related data.
  • COTS packages typically allow power users to merge records without creating orphaned records in related tables, but custom-built applications typically require IT expertise.

Create and Enforce Standards & Policies

Now that the data has been cleaned, protect the system from relapsing.

Work with business users to find out what types of data require validation and which fields should have changes audited. Whenever possible, implement drop-down lists to standardize values and make programming changes to ensure that truncation ceases.

  • Truncated data is usually caused by mismatches in data structures during either one-time data loads or ongoing data integrations.
  • Don’t go overboard on assigning required fields – users will just put key data in note fields.
  • Discourage the use of unstructured note fields: the data is effectively lost unless it gets subpoenaed.
  • To specify policies, use Info-Tech’s Master Data Record Tool.

Profile your customer and sales-related data

Applications are a critical component of how IT supports Sales, but IT also needs to help Sales keep its data current and accurate. Conducting a sales data audit is critical to ensure Sales has the right information at the right time.

Info-Tech Insight

Data is king. More than ever, having accurate data is essential for your organization to win in hyper-competitive marketplaces. Prudent current state analysis looks at both the overall data model and data architecture, as well as assessing data quality within critical sales-related repositories. As the amount of customer data grows exponentially due to the rise of mobility and the Internet of Things, you must have a forward-looking data model and data marts/customer data warehouse to support sales-relevant decisions.

  • A current state analysis for sales data follows a multi-step process:
    • Determine the location of all sales-relevant and customer data – the sales data inventory. Data can reside in applications, warehouses, and documents (e.g. Excel and Access files) – be sure to take a holistic approach.
  • For each data source, assess data quality across the following categories:
    • Completeness
    • Currency (Relevancy)
    • Correctness
    • Duplication
  • After assessing data quality, determine which repositories need the most attention by IT and Sales. We will look at opportunities for data consolidation later in the blueprint.

INFO-TECH OPPORTUNITY

Refer to Info-Tech’s Develop a Master Data Management Strategy and Roadmap blueprint for further reference and assistance in data management for your sales-IT alignment.

Activity: Develop a mitigation plan for poor quality customer data

2.4.2 30 minutes

Input

  • List of departments involved in maintenance of CXM data

Output

  • Data quality preservation plan
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Inventory a list of departments that will be interacting directly with CXM data.
  2. Identify data quality cleansing and preservation initiatives, such as those in previous examples.
  3. Assign accountability to an individual in the department as a data steward. When deciding on a data steward, consider the following:
    • Data stewards are designated full-time employees who serve as the go-to resource for all issues pertaining to data quality, including keeping a particular data silo clean and free of errors.
    • Data stewards are typically mid-level managers in the business (not IT), preferably with an interest in improving data quality and a relatively high degree of tech-savviness.
    • Data stewards can sometimes be created as a new role with a dedicated FTE, but this is not usually cost effective for small and mid-sized firms.
    • Instead, diffuse the steward role across several existing positions, including one for CRM and other marketing, sales, and service applications.
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Data Steward Structure

Department A

  • Data Steward (CRM)
  • Data Steward (ERP)

Department B

  • Data Steward (All)

Department C

  • Data Steward (All)

Determine if a customer data warehouse will add value to your CXM technology-enablement strategy

A customer data warehouse (CDW) “is a subject-oriented, integrated, time-variant, non-volatile collection of data used to support the strategic decision-making process across marketing, sales, and service. It is the central point of data integration for customer intelligence and is the source of data for the data marts, delivering a common view of customer data” (Corporate Information Factory, n.d.).

Analogy

CDWs are like a buffet. All the food items are in the buffet. Likewise, your corporate data sources are centralized into one repository. There are so many food items in a buffet that you may need to organize them into separate food stations (data marts) for easier access.

Examples/Use Cases

  • Time series analyses with historical data
  • Enterprise level, common view analyses
  • Integrated, comprehensive customer profiles
  • One-stop repository of all corporate information

Pros

  • Top-down architectural planning
  • Subject areas are integrated
  • Time-variant, changes to the data are tracked
  • Non-volatile, data is never over-written or deleted

Cons

  • A massive amount of corporate information
  • Slower delivery
  • Changes are harder to make
  • Data format is not very business friendly

Activity: Assess the need for a customer data warehouse

2.4.3. 30 minutes

Input

  • List of data sources
  • Data inflows and outflows

Output

  • Data quality preservation plan
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Create a shortlist of customer data sources.
  2. Profile the integration points that are necessary to support inflows and outflows of customer data.
  3. Ask the following questions around the need for a CDW based on these data sources and points of integration:
    • What is the volume of customer information that needs to be stored? The greater the capacity, the more likely that you should build a dedicated CDW.
    • How complex is the data? The more complex the data, the greater the need for a CDW.
    • How often will data interchange happen between various applications and data sources? The greater and more frequent the interchange, the greater the need for a CDW.
    • What are your organizational capabilities for building a CDW? Do you have the resources in-house to create a CDW at this time?
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

INFO-TECH OPPORTUNITY

Refer to Info-Tech’s Build an Agile Data Warehouse blueprint for more information on building a centralized and integrated data warehouse.

Create a plan for end-user training on new (or refocused) CXM applications and data quality processes

All training modules will be different, but some will have overlapping areas of interest.

– Assign Project Evangelists – Analytics Training – Mobile Training

Application Training

  • Customer Service - Assign Project Evangelists – Analytics Training – Mobile Training
    • Focus training on:
      • What to do with inbound tickets.
      • Routing and escalation features.
      • How to use knowledge management features effectively.
      • Call center capabilities.
  • Sales – Assign Project Evangelists – Analytics Training – Mobile Training
    • Focus training on:
      • Recording of opportunities, leads, and deals.
      • How to maximize sales with sales support decision tree.
  • Marketing - Assign Project Evangelists – Analytics Training
    • Focus training on:
      • Campaign management features.
      • Social media monitoring and engagement capabilities.
  • IT
    • Focus training on:
      • Familiarization with the software.
      • Software integration with other enterprise applications.
      • The technical support needed to maintain the system in the future.

Info-Tech Insight

Train customers too. Keep the customer-facing sales portals simple and intuitive, have clear explanations/instructions under important functions (e.g. brief directions on how to initiate service inquiries), and provide examples of proper uses (e.g. effective searches). Make sure customers are aware of escalation options available to them if self-service falls short.

Ensure adoption with a formal communication process to keep departments apprised of new application rollouts

The team leading the rollout of new initiatives (be they applications, new governance structures, or data quality procedures) should establish a communication process to ensure management and users are well informed.

CXM-related department groups or designated trainers should take the lead and implement a process for:

  • Scheduling application platform/process rollout/kick-off meetings.
  • Soliciting preliminary input from the attending groups to develop further training plans.
  • Establishing communication paths and the key communication agents from each department who are responsible for keeping lines open moving forward.

The overall objective for inter-departmental kick-off meetings is to confirm that all parties agree on certain key points and understand alignment rationale and new sales app or process functionality.

The kick-off process will significantly improve internal communications by inviting all affected internal IT groups, including business units, to work together to address significant issues before the application process is formally activated.

The kick-off meeting(s) should encompass:

  • Target business-user requirements
  • The high-level application overview
  • Tangible business benefits of alignment
  • Special consideration needs
  • Other IT department needs
  • Target quality of service (QoS) metrics

Info-Tech Insight

Determine who in each department will send out a message about initiative implementation, the tone of the message, the medium, and the delivery date.

Construct a formal communication plan to engage stakeholders through structured channels

Tangible Elements of a Communications Plan

  • Stakeholder Group Name
  • Stakeholder Description
  • Message
  • Concerns Relative to Application Maintenance
  • Communication Medium
  • Role Responsible for Communication
  • Frequency
  • Start and End Date

Intangible Elements of a Communications Plan

  • Establish biweekly meetings with representatives from sales functional groups, who are tasked with reporting on:
    • Benefits of revised processes
    • Metrics of success
    • Resource restructuring
  • Establish a monthly interdepartmental meeting, where all representatives from sales and IT leadership discuss pressing bug fixes and minor process improvements.
  • Create a webinar series, complete with Q&A, so that stakeholders can reference these changes at their leisure.

Info-Tech Insight

Every piece of information that you give to a stakeholder that is not directly relevant to their interests is a distraction from your core message. Always remember to tailor the message, medium, and timing accordingly.

Carry the CXM value forward with linkage and relationships between sales, marketing, service, and IT

Once the sales-IT alignment committees have been formed, create organizational cadence through a variety of formal and informal gatherings between the two business functions.

  • Organizations typically fall in one of three maturity stages: isolation, collaboration, or synergy. Strive to achieve business-technology synergy at the operational level.
  • Although collaboration cannot be mandated, it can be facilitated. Start with a simple gauge of the two functions’ satisfaction with each other, and determine where and how inter-functional communication and synergy can be constructed.

Isolation

The image shows four shapes, with the words IT, Sales, Customer Service, and Marketing in them.

  • Point solutions are implemented on an ad-hoc basis by individual departments for specific projects.
  • Internal IT is rarely involved in these projects from beginning to end.

Collaboration

The image features that same four shapes and text from the previous image, but this time they are connected by dotted lines.

  • There is a formal cross-departmental effort to integrate some point solutions.
  • Internal IT gets involved to integrate systems and then support system interactions.

Synergy

The image features the same shapes and text from previous instances, except the shapes are now connect by solid lines and the entire image is surrounded by dotted lines.

  • Cross-functional, business technology teams are established to work on IT-enabled revenue generation initiatives.
  • Team members are collocated if possible.

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

2.4.1 Develop a CXM application integration map

Using the inventory of existing CXM-supporting applications and the newly formed CXM application portfolio as inputs, your facilitator will assist you in creating an integration map of applications to establish a system of record and flow of data.

2.4.2 Develop a mitigation plan for poor quality customer data

Our facilitator will educate your stakeholders on the importance of quality data and guide you through the creation of a mitigation plan for data preservation.

2.4.3 Assess the need for a customer data warehouse

Addressing important factors such as data volume, complexity, and flow, a facilitator will help you assess whether or not a customer data warehouse for CXM is the right fit for your organization.

Phase 3

Finalize the CXM Framework

Build a Strong Technology Foundation for Customer Experience Management

Phase 3 outline

Call 1-888-670-8889 or email GuidedImplementations@InfoTech.com for more information.

Complete these steps on your own, or call us to complete a guided implementation. A guided implementation is a series of 2-3 advisory calls that help you execute each phase of a project. They are included in most advisory memberships.

Guided Implementation 3: Finalize the CXM Framework

Proposed Time to Completion: 1 week

Step 3.1: Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

Start with an analyst kick-off call:

  • Discuss strategic requirements and the associated application portfolio that has been proposed.

Then complete these activities…

  • Initiatives prioritization

With these tools & templates:

  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

Step 3.2: Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Review findings with analyst:

  • Discuss roadmap and next steps in terms of rationalizing and implementing specific technology-centric initiatives or rollouts.

Then complete these activities…

  • Confirm stakeholder strategy presentation

With these tools & templates:

  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

Phase 3 Results & Insights:

  • Initiatives roadmap

Step 3.1: Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities:

  • Create a risk management plan
  • Brainstorm initiatives for CXM roadmap
  • Identify dependencies and enabling projects for your CXM roadmap
  • Complete the CXM roadmap

Outcomes:

  • Risk management plan
  • CXM roadmap
    • Quick-win initiatives

A CXM technology-enablement roadmap will provide smooth and timely implementation of your apps/initiatives

Creating a comprehensive CXM strategy roadmap reduces the risk of rework, misallocation of resources, and project delays or abandonment.

  • People
  • Processes
  • Technology
  • Timeline
  • Tasks
  • Budget

Benefits of a Roadmap

  1. Prioritize execution of initiatives in alignment with business, IT, and needs.
  2. Create clearly defined roles and responsibilities for IT and business stakeholders.
  3. Establish clear timelines for rollout of initiatives.
  4. Identify key functional areas and processes.
  5. Highlight dependencies and prerequisites for successful deployment.
  6. Reduce the risk of rework due to poor execution.

Implement planning and controls for project execution

Risk Management

  • Track risks associated with your CXM project.
  • Assign owners and create plans for resolving open risks.
  • Identify risks associated with related projects.
  • Create a plan for effectively communicating project risks.

Change Management

  • Brainstorm a high-level training plan for various users of the CXM.
  • Create a communication plan to notify stakeholders and impacted users about the tool and how it will alter their workday and performance of role activities.
  • Establish a formal change management process that is flexible enough to meet the demands for change.

Project Management

  • Conduct a post-mortem to evaluate the completion of the CXM strategy.
  • Design the project management process to be adaptive in nature.
  • Communication is key to project success, whether it is to external stakeholders or internal project team members..
  • Review the project’s performance against metrics and expectations.

INFO-TECH OPPORTUNITIES

Optimize the Change Management Process

You need to design a process that is flexible enough to meet demand for change and strict enough to protect the live environment from change-related incidents.

Create Project Management Success

Investing time up front to plan the project and implementing best practices during project execution to ensure the project is delivered with the planned outcome and quality is critical to project success.

Activity: Create a risk management plan

3.1.1 45 minutes

Input

  • Inventory of risks

Output

  • Risk management plan
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Create a list of possible risks that may hamper the progress of your CXM project.
  2. Classify risks as strategy-based, related to planning, or systems-based, related to technology.
  3. Brainstorm mitigation strategies to overcome each listed risk.
  4. On a score of 1 to 3, determine the impact of each risk on the success of the project.
  5. On a score of 1 to 3, determine the likelihood of the occurrence for each risk.
  6. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Constructing a Risk Management Plan

Risk Impact Likelihood Mitigation Effort
Strategy Risks Project over budget
  • Detailed project plan
  • Pricing guarantees
Inadequate content governance
System Risks Integration with additional systems
  • Develop integration plan and begin testing integration methods early in the project
.... ... ... ...

Likelihood

1 – High/ Needs Focus

2 – Can Be Mitigated

3 - Unlikely

Impact

1 - High Risk

2 - Moderate Risk

3 - Minimal Risk

Prepare contingency plans to minimize time spent handling unexpected risks

Understanding technical and strategic risks can help you establish contingency measures to reduce the likelihood that risks will occur. Devise mitigation strategies to help offset the impact of risks if contingency measures are not enough.

Remember

The biggest sources of risk in a CXM strategy are lack of planning, poorly defined requirements, and lack of governance.

Apply the following mitigation tips to avoid pitfalls and delays.

Risk Mitigation Tips

  • Upfront planning
  • Realistic timelines
  • Resource support
  • Change management
  • Executive sponsorship
  • Sufficient funding
  • Expectation setting
  1. Project Starts
    • Expectations are high
  2. Project Workload Increases
    • Expectations are high
  3. Pit of Despair
    • Why are we doing this?
  4. Project Nears Close
    • Benefits are being realized
  5. Implementation is Completed
    • Learning curve dip
  6. Standardization & Optimization
    • Benefits are high

Identify factors to complete your CXM initiatives roadmap

Completion of initiatives for your CXM project will be contingent upon multiple variables.

Defining Dependencies

Initiative complexity will define the need for enabling projects. Create a process to define dependencies:

  1. Enabling projects: complex prerequisites.
  2. Preceding tasks: direct and simplified assignments.

Establishing a Timeline

  • Assign realistic timelines for each initiative to ensure smooth progress.
  • Use milestones and stage gates to track the progress of your initiatives and tasks.

Defining Importance

  • Based on requirements gathering, identify the importance of each initiative to your marketing department.
  • Each initiative can be ranked high, medium, or low.

Assigning Ownership

  • Owners are responsible for on-time completion of their assigned initiatives.
  • Populate a RACI chart to ensure coverage of all initiatives.

Complex....Initiative

  • Enabling Project
    • Preceding Task
    • Preceding Task
  • Enabling Project
    • Preceding Task
    • Preceding Task

Simple....Initiative

  • Preceding Task
  • Preceding Task
  • Preceding Task

Activity: Brainstorm CXM application initiatives for implementation in alignment with business needs

3.1.2 45 minutes

Input

  • Inventory of CXM initiatives

Output

  • Prioritized and quick-win initiatives
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. As a team, identify and list CXM initiatives that need to be addressed.
  2. Plot the initiatives on the complexity-value matrix to determine priority.
  3. Identify quick wins: initiatives that can realize quick benefits with little effort.
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Importance-Capability Matrix

The image shows a matrix, with Initiative Complexity on the X-axis, and Business Value on the Y-axis. There are circle of different sizes in the matrix.

Pinpoint quick wins: high importance, low effort initiatives.

The size of each plotted initiative must indicate the effort or the complexity and time required to complete.
Top Right Quadrant Strategic Projects
Top Left Quadrant Quick Wins
Bottom Right Quadrant Risky Bets
Bottom Left Quadrant Discretionary Projects

Activity: Identify any dependencies or enabling projects for your CXM roadmap

3.1.3 1 hour

Input

  • Implementation initiatives
  • Dependencies

Output

  • CXM project dependencies

Materials

  • Sticky notes
  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Using sticky notes and a whiteboard, have each team member rank the compiled initiatives in terms of priority.
  2. Determine preceding tasks or enabling projects that each initiative is dependent upon.
  3. Determine realistic timelines to complete each quick win, enabling project, and long-term initiative.
  4. Assign an owner for each initiative.

Example: Project Dependencies

Initiative: Omnichannel E-Commerce

Dependency: WEM Suite Deployment; CRM Suite Deployment; Order Fulfillment Capabilities

Activity: Complete the implementation roadmap

3.1.4 30 minutes

Input

  • Implementation initiatives
  • Dependencies

Output

  • CXM Roadmap
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Establish time frames to highlight enabling projects, quick wins, and long-term initiatives.
  2. Indicate the importance of each initiative as high, medium, or low based on the output in Activity 3.1.2.
  3. Assign each initiative to a member of the project team. Each owner will be responsible for the execution of a given initiative as planned.
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Example: Importance-Capability Matrix

Importance Initiative Owner Completion Date
Example Projects High Gather business requirements. Project Manager MM/DD/YYYY
Quick Wins
Long Term Medium Implement e-commerce across all sites. CFO & Web Manager MM/DD/YYYY

Importance

  • High
  • Medium
  • Low

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

  • To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.
  • Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team onsite at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.
  • Contact your account manager (www.infotech.com/account), or email Workshops@InfoTech.com for more information.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

3.1.1 Create a risk management plan

Based on the workshop exercises, the facilitator will work with the core team to design a priority-based risk mitigation plan that enumerates the most salient risks to the CXM project and addresses them.

3.1.2; 3.1.3; 3.1.4 Identify initiative dependencies and create the CXM roadmap

After identifying dependencies, our facilitators will work with your IT SMEs and business stakeholders to create a comprehensive roadmap, outlining the initiatives needed to carry out your CXM strategy roadmap.

Step 3.2: Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Phase 1

1.1 Create the Project Vision

1.2 Structure the Project

Phase 2

2.1 Scan the External Environment

2.2 Assess the Current State of CXM

2.3 Create an Application Portfolio

2.4 Develop Deployment Best Practices

Phase 3

3.1 Create an Initiative Rollout Plan

3.2 Confirm and Finalize the CXM Blueprint

Activities:

  • Identify success metrics
  • Create a stakeholder power map
  • Create a stakeholder communication plan
  • Complete and present CXM strategy stakeholder presentation

Outcomes:

  • Stakeholder communication plan
  • CXM strategy stakeholder presentation

Ensure that your CXM applications are improving the performance of targeted processes by establishing metrics

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Key performance indicators (KPIs) are quantifiable measures that demonstrate the effectiveness of a process and its ability to meet business objectives.

Questions to Ask

  1. What outputs of the process can be used to measure success?
  2. How do you measure process efficiency and effectiveness?

Creating KPIs

Specific

Measurable

Achievable

Realistic

Time-bound

Follow the SMART methodology when developing KPIs for each process.

Adhering to this methodology is a key component of the Lean management methodology. This framework will help you avoid establishing general metrics that aren’t relevant.

Info-Tech Insight

Metrics are essential to your ability to measure and communicate the success of the CXM strategy to the business. Speak the same language as the business and choose metrics that relate to marketing, sales, and customer service objectives.

Activity: Identify metrics to communicate process success

3.2.1 1 hour

Input

  • Key organizational objectives

Output

  • Strategic business metrics
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Whiteboard
  • Markers

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Recap the major functions that CXM will focus on (e.g. marketing, sales, customer service, web experience management, social media management, etc.)
  2. Identify business metrics that reflect organizational objectives for each function.
  3. Establish goals for each metric (as exemplified below).
  4. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.
  5. Communicate the chosen metrics and the respective goals to stakeholders.

Example: Metrics for Marketing, Sales, and Customer Service Functions

Metric Example
Marketing Customer acquisition cost X% decrease in costs relating to advertising spend
Ratio of lifetime customer value X% decrease in customer churn
Marketing originated customer % X% increase in % of customer acquisition driven by marketing
Sales Conversion rate X% increase conversion of lead to sale
Lead response time X% decrease in response time per lead
Opportunity-to-win ratio X% increase in monthly/annual opportunity-to-win ratio
Customer Service First response time X% decreased time it takes for customer to receive first response
Time-to-resolution X% decrease of average time-to-resolution
Customer satisfaction X% improvement of customer satisfaction ratings on immediate feedback survey

Use Info-Tech’s Stakeholder Power Map Template to identify stakeholders crucial to CXM application rollouts

3.2.2 Stakeholder Power Map Template

Use this template and its power map to help visualize the importance of various stakeholders and their concerns. Prioritize your time according to the most powerful and most impacted stakeholders.

Answer questions about each stakeholder:

  • Power: How much influence does the stakeholder have? Enough to drive the project forward or into the ground?
  • Involvement: How interested is the stakeholder? How involved is the stakeholder in the project already?
  • Impact: To what degree will the stakeholder be impacted? Will this significantly change how they do their job?
  • Support: Is the stakeholder a supporter of the project? Neutral? A resistor?

Focus on key players: relevant stakeholders who have high power, should have high involvement, and are highly impacted.

INFO-TECH DELIVERABLE

Stakeholder Power Map Template

Use Info-Tech’s Stakeholder Communication Planning Template to document initiatives and track communication

3.2.3 Stakeholder Communication Planning Template

Use the Stakeholder Communication Planning Template to document your list of initiative stakeholders so you can track them and plan communication throughout the initiative.

Track the communication methods needed to convey information regarding CXM initiatives. Communicate how a specific initiative will impact the way employees work and the work they do.

Sections of the document:

  1. Document the Stakeholder Power Map (output of Tool 3.2.2).
  2. Complete the Communicate Management Plan to aid in the planning and tracking of communication and training.

INFO-TECH DELIVERABLE

Activity: Create a stakeholder power map and communication plan

3.2.4 1 hour

Input

  • Stakeholder power map

Output

  • Stakeholder communication plan
  • CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation

Materials

  • Info-Tech’s Stakeholder Communication Planning Template
  • Info-Tech’s Stakeholder Power Map Template

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Using Info-Tech’s Stakeholder Power Map Template, identify key stakeholders for ensuring the success of the CXM strategy (Tool 3.2.2).
  2. Using Info-Tech’s Stakeholder Communication Plan Template, construct a communication plan to communicate and track CXM initiatives with all CXM stakeholders (Tool 3.2.3).
  3. Document your outputs in the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template.

Use Info-Tech’s CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template to sell your CXM strategy to the business

3.2.5 CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template

Complete the presentation template as indicated when you see the green icon throughout this deck. Include the outputs of all activities that are marked with this icon.

Info-Tech has designed the CXM Strategy Stakeholder Presentation Template to capture the most critical aspects of the CXM strategy. Customize it to best convey your message to project stakeholders and to suit your organization.

The presentation should be no longer than one hour. However, additional slides can be added at the discretion of the presenter. Make sure there is adequate time for a question and answer period.

INFO-TECH DELIVERABLE

After the presentation, email the deck to stakeholders to ensure they have it available for their own reference.

Activity: Determine the measured value received from the project

3.2.6 30 minutes

Input

  • Project Metrics

Output

  • Measured Value Calculation

Materials

  • Workbook

Participants

  • Project Team

Instructions

  1. Review project metrics identified in phase 1 and associated benchmarks.
  2. After executing the CXM project, compare metrics that were identified in the benchmarks with the revised and assess the delta.
  3. Calculate the percentage change and quantify dollar impact (i.e. as a result of increased customer acquisition or retention).

If you want additional support, have our analysts guide you through this phase as part of an Info-Tech workshop

Book a workshop with our Info-Tech analysts:

  • To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.
  • Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team onsite at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.
  • Contact your account manager (www.infotech.com/account), or email Workshops@InfoTech.com for more information.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

3.2.4 Create a stakeholder power map and communication plan

An analyst will walk the project team through the creation of a communication plan, inclusive of project metrics and their respective goals. If you are planning a variety of CXM initiatives, track how the change will be communicated and to whom. Determine the employees who will be impacted by the change.

Insight breakdown

Insight 1

  • IT must work in lockstep with Marketing, Sales, and Customer Service to develop a comprehensive technology-enablement strategy for CXM.
  • As IT works with its stakeholders in the business, it must endeavor to capture and use the voice of the customer in driving strategic requirements for CXM portfolio design.
  • IT must consider the external environment, customer personas, and internal processes as it designs strategic requirements to build the CXM application portfolio.

Insight 2

  • The cloud is bringing significant disruption to the CXM space: to maintain relevancy, IT must become deeply involved in ensuring alignment between vendor capabilities and strategic requirements.
  • IT must serve as a trusted advisor on technical implementation challenges related to CXM, such as data quality, integration, and end-user training and adoption.
  • IT is responsible for technology enablement and is an indispensable partner in this regard; however, the business must ultimately own the objectives and communication strategy for customer engagement.

Insight 3

  • When crafting a portfolio for CXM, be aware of the art of the possible: capabilities are rapidly merging and evolving to support new interaction channels. Social, mobile, and IoT are disrupting the customer experience landscape.
  • Big data and analytics-driven decision making is another significant area of value. IT must allow for true customer intelligence by providing an integration framework across customer-facing applications.

Summary of accomplishment

Knowledge Gained

  • Voice of the Customer for CXM Portfolio Design
  • Understanding of Strategic Requirements for CXM
  • Customer Personas and Scenarios
  • Environmental Scan
  • Deployment Considerations
  • Initiatives Roadmap Considerations

Processes Optimized

  • CXM Technology Portfolio Design
  • Customer Data Quality Processes
  • CXM Integrations

Deliverables Completed

  • Strategic Summary for CXM
  • CXM Project Charter
  • Customer Personas
  • External and Competitive Analysis
  • CXM Application Portfolio

Bibliography

Accenture Digital. “Growing the Digital Business: Accenture Mobility Research 2015.” Accenture. 2015. Web.

Afshar, Vala. “50 Important Customer Experience Stats for Business Leaders.” Huffington Post. 15 Oct. 2015. Web.

APQC. “Marketing and Sales Definitions and Key Measures.” APQC’s Process Classification Framework, Version 1.0.0. APQC. Mar. 2011. Web.

CX Network. “The Evolution of Customer Experience in 2015.” Customer Experience Network. 2015. Web.

Genesys. “State of Customer Experience Research”. Genesys. 2018. Web.

Harvard Business Review and SAS. “Lessons From the Leading Edge of Customer Experience Management.” Harvard Business School Publishing. 2014. Web.

Help Scout. “75 Customer Service Facts, Quotes & Statistics.” Help Scout. n.d. Web.

Inmon Consulting Services. “Corporate Information Factory (CIF) Overview.” Corporate Information Factory. n.d. Web

Jurevicius, Ovidijus. “VRIO Framework.” Strategic Management Insight. 21 Oct. 2013. Web.

Keenan, Jim, and Barbara Giamanco. “Social Media and Sales Quota.” A Sales Guy Consulting and Social Centered Selling. n.d. Web.

Malik, Om. “Internet of Things Will Have 24 Billion Devices by 2020.” Gigaom. 13 Oct. 2011. Web.

McGovern, Michele. “Customers Want More: 5 New Expectations You Must Meet Now.” Customer Experience Insight. 30 July 2015. Web.

McGinnis, Devon. “40 Customer Service Statistics to Move Your Business Forward.” Salesforce Blog. 1 May 2019. Web.

Bibliography

Reichheld, Fred. “Prescription for Cutting Costs”. Bain & Company. n.d. Web.

Retail Congress Asia Pacific. “SAP – Burberry Makes Shopping Personal.” Retail Congress Asia Pacific. 2017. Web.

Rouse, Margaret. “Omnichannel Definition.” TechTarget. Feb. 2014. Web.

Salesforce Research. “Customer Expectations Hit All-Time High.” Salesforce Research. 2018. Web.

Satell, Greg. “A Look Back at Why Blockbuster Really Failed and Why It Didn’t Have To.” Forbes. 5 Sept. 2014. Web.

Social Centered Learning. “Social Media and Sales Quota: The Impact of Social Media on Sales Quota and Corporate Review.” Social Centered Learning. n.d. Web.

Varner, Scott. “Economic Impact of Experience Management”. Qualtrics/Forrester. 16 Aug. 2017. Web.

Wesson, Matt. “How to Use Your Customer Data Like Amazon.” Salesforce Pardot Blog. 27 Aug. 2012. Web.

Winterberry Group. “Taking Cues From the Customer: ‘Omnichannel’ and the Drive For Audience Engagement.” Winterberry Group LLC. June 2013. Web.

Wollan, Robert, and Saideep Raj. “How CIOs Can Support a More Agile Sales Organization.” The Wall Street Journal: The CIO Report. 25 July 2013. Web.

Zendesk. “The Impact of Customer Service on Customer Lifetime Value 2013.” Z Library. n.d. Web.

About Info-Tech

Info-Tech Research Group is the world’s fastest-growing information technology research and advisory company, proudly serving over 30,000 IT professionals.

We produce unbiased and highly relevant research to help CIOs and IT leaders make strategic, timely, and well-informed decisions. We partner closely with IT teams to provide everything they need, from actionable tools to analyst guidance, ensuring they deliver measurable results for their organizations.

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Average $ Saved

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After each Info-Tech experience, we ask our members to quantify the real-time savings, monetary impact, and project improvements our research helped them achieve.

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What Is a Blueprint?

A blueprint is designed to be a roadmap, containing a methodology and the tools and templates you need to solve your IT problems.

Each blueprint can be accompanied by a Guided Implementation that provides you access to our world-class analysts to help you get through the project.

Need Extra Help?
Speak With An Analyst

Get the help you need in this 3-phase advisory process. You'll receive 7 touchpoints with our researchers, all included in your membership.

Guided Implementation 1: Drive measurable value with a world-class CXM program
  • Call 1: Determine project vision for CXM
  • Call 2: Review CXM project charter

Guided Implementation 2: Create a strategic framework for CXM technology enablement
  • Call 1: Review environmental scan
  • Call 2: Review application portfolio for CXM

Guided Implementation 3: Finalize the CXM framework
  • Call 1: Confirm deployment best practices
  • Call 2: Review initiatives rollout plan
  • Call 3: Confirm CXM roadmap

Authors

Ben Dickie

Jessica Jenkins

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