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Design an Enterprise Architecture Strategy

Develop a strategy that fits the organization’s maturity and remains adaptable to unforeseen future changes.

  • The enterprise architecture (EA) team is constantly challenged to articulate the value of its function.
  • The CIO has asked the EA team to help articulate the business value the team brings.
  • Traceability from the business goals and vision to the EA contributions often does not exist.
  • Also, clients often struggle with complexity, priorities, and agile execution.

Our Advice

Critical Insight

  • EA can deliver many benefits to an organization. However, to increase the likelihood of success, the EA group needs to deliver value to the business and cannot be seen solely as IT.
  • Support from the organization is needed.
  • An EA strategy anchored in a value proposition will ensure that EA focuses on driving the most critical outcomes in support of the organization’s enterprise strategy.
  • As agility is not just for project execution, architects need to understand ways to deliver their guidance to influence project execution in real time, to enable the enterprise agility, and to enhance their responsiveness to changing conditions.

Impact and Result

  • Create an EA value proposition based on enterprise needs that clearly articulates the expected contributions of the EA function.
  • Establish the EA fundamentals (vision and mission statement, goals and objectives, and principles) needed to position the EA function to deliver the promised value proposition.
  • Identify the services that EA has to provide to the organization to deliver on the promised value proposition.

Design an Enterprise Architecture Strategy Research & Tools

1. Design an Enterprise Architecture Strategy Deck – A guide to help you define services that your EA function will provide to the organization.

Establish an effective EA function that will realize value for the organization with an EA strategy.

An EA strategy is the first step to creating an effective EA function; only by first demonstrating the value of EA to organizational stakeholders can the EA function operate to generate value.

2. EA Function Strategy Template – A communication tool to secure the approval of the EA strategy from organizational stakeholders.

Use this template to document the outputs of the EA strategy and to communicate the EA strategy for approval by stakeholders.

3. Stakeholder Power Map Template – A template to help visualize the importance of various stakeholders and their concerns.

Identify and prioritize the stakeholders that are important to your IT strategy development effort.

4. PESTLE Analysis Template – A template to help you complete and document a PESTLE analysis.

Use this template to analyze the effect of external factors on IT.

5. EA Value Proposition Template – A template to communicate the value EA can provide to the organization.

Use this template to create an EA value proposition that explicitly communicates to stakeholders how an EA function can contribute to addressing their needs.

6. EA Goals and Objectives Template – A template to identify the EA goals that support the identified promises of value from the EA value proposition.

Use this template to help set goals for your EA function based on the EA value proposition and identify objectives to measure the progression towards those EA goals.

7. EA Principles Template – A template to identify the universal EA principles relevant to your organization.

Use this template to define relevant universal EA principles and create new EA principles to guide and inform IT investment decisions.

8. EA Service Planning Tool – A template to identify the EA services your organization will provide to deliver on the EA value proposition.

Use this template to identify the EA services relevant to your organization and then define how those services will be accessed.


Member Testimonials

After each Info-Tech experience, we ask our members to quantify the real-time savings, monetary impact, and project improvements our research helped them achieve. See our top member experiences for this blueprint and what our clients have to say.

9.4/10


Overall Impact

$65,310


Average $ Saved

32


Average Days Saved

Client

Experience

Impact

$ Saved

Days Saved

Shared Services Canada - Chief Information Office

Guided Implementation

9/10

N/A

1

MASC

Guided Implementation

9/10

N/A

10

Good experience as a whole. Knowledgeable consultant in the topic. The service could improve by making best practice and methodologies more concr... Read More

Sydney Water

Guided Implementation

9/10

$4,299

2

Very Knowledgeable and has lost of examples and reference documents.

DPHI – Department of Planning, Housing & Infrastructure

Guided Implementation

9/10

$13,759

10

Ministry of Industry, Innovation, Science and Technology

Workshop

10/10

$64,999

120

The best part was having a new understanding of what my Ministry should be trying to accomplish and replicate to other Ministries and Departments a... Read More

Halifax Port Authority

Guided Implementation

8/10

$50,000

20

Nitin provided an excellent overview of Info-Tech's Enterprise Architecture strategy blueprint, including the advisory service, workshops, and cons... Read More

General Dynamics Mission Systems, Inc

Workshop

9/10

$12,999

5

Overall the experience was excellent. The best part was working on the EA Services RACI and Roadmap. The worst part was we could have used more t... Read More

California Department of Toxic Substances Control

Guided Implementation

10/10

$2,599

50

Nitin is an excellent consultant and advisor, he definitely has added value and insight in DTSC's creation of an EA strategy.

Kentucky Fried Chicken UK

Guided Implementation

10/10

$3,280

5

Community Health Choice, Inc.

Workshop

10/10

$129K

100

The workshop was very enlighten to the entire team as we had a misconception of what the responsibilities of an EA. We all enjoyed everything abou... Read More

Amey

Guided Implementation

10/10

$4,920

3

US Department of the Interior - Fish and Wildlife Service

Workshop

9/10

$1.04M

100

The first workshop was not what FWS expected, however once they received feedback they delivered what we had hoped on the first go around.

NSW Police

Workshop

10/10

$21,499

10

Excellent engagement during workshop, and Gerald provided myself and the EA team with a clear direction on how to move forward with some of our key... Read More

BRP Group

Workshop

10/10

$129K

50

Best part was lots of engagement from the team members.

Langara College

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

90

Infotech has a clear structured approach and experience with the work we needed help with. Having them to validate our issues and advise on the ne... Read More

Toll Brothers Inc

Guided Implementation

9/10

$12,999

14

Good discussion, needed more time. Will plan to book additional time and discuss possible workshop.

The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics

Guided Implementation

9/10

$5,199

2

It was a pleasure engaging with Milena over the two sessions. She is clearly very experienced with Enterprise architecture and she was able to adap... Read More

Kuvare US Holdings

Workshop

10/10

$129K

85

Andy is a joy to work with. He immediately comes across to participants as an inspiring expert they can trust. Since this workshop involved all IT ... Read More

Immanuel

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

2

This was my response. I am very happy with this engagement. Milena, It was wonderful to meet you. Your knowledge of EA was tremendously clea... Read More

Pacific Blue Cross

Guided Implementation

8/10

N/A

2

Delta Dental Plan of New Jersey

Guided Implementation

9/10

$25,829

120

The best part of the experience was the ability Milena had to tailored the InfoTech delivery template to produce session outputs in the appropriate... Read More

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Guided Implementation

10/10

$10,000

20

Milena is very knowledgeable and insightful.

Louisiana Health Service & Indemnity Company d/b/a Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana

Workshop

10/10

$64,999

50

Reddy is an excellent facilitator. His knowledge on the subject matter is apparent. The entire department indicated that they learned a great dea... Read More

Cascades, Centre des Technologies

Guided Implementation

9/10

$10,000

2

Napier City Council

Guided Implementation

8/10

$7,559

3

Good to get this initial phase done - thanks Anu

Washington Technology Solutions

Guided Implementation

9/10

N/A

N/A

Best - framework that we can adopt to assess our own maturity. Worst - not enough time :D

Loto-Québec

Guided Implementation

10/10

$50,000

10

Choice Hotels International Services Corp.

Guided Implementation

10/10

$62,999

50

No worst parts. Milena helps to validate my thinking and push me beyond my current level of understanding on the EA space. I consider her a trusted... Read More

The Regional Municipality of Peel

Guided Implementation

10/10

$1,900

5

Afreximbank

Workshop

9/10

$75,000

60

Very insightful as we are moving into the stage of developing the Business Architecture.


Enterprise Architecture

EA teams need to understand the dynamic relationship between organizational complexity, operational maturity, and stakeholder value. This relationship forms the foundation for building value-driven roadmaps anchored in stakeholder needs..
This course makes up part of the Service Planning & Architecture Certificate.

Now Playing:
Executive Brief

An active membership is required to access Info-Tech Academy
  • Course Modules: 4
  • Estimated Completion Time: 1 hour
  • Featured Analysts:
  • Gord Harrison, SVP Research & Advisory
  • Arif Mustafa, Research Director, Enterprise Architecture

Workshop: Design an Enterprise Architecture Strategy

Workshops offer an easy way to accelerate your project. If you are unable to do the project yourself, and a Guided Implementation isn't enough, we offer low-cost delivery of our project workshops. We take you through every phase of your project and ensure that you have a roadmap in place to complete your project successfully.

Module 1: Map the EA Contributions to Business Goals

The Purpose

Show an example of traceability.

Key Benefits Achieved

Members have a real-world example of traceability between business goals and EA contributions.

Activities

Outputs

1.1

Start from the business goals of the organization.

  • Business goals documented.
1.2

Document business and IT drivers.

  • Business and IT drivers documented.
1.3

Identify EA contributions that help achieve the business goals.

  • Identified EA contributions and traced them to business goals.

Module 2: Determine the Role of the Architect in the Agile Ceremonies of the Organization

The Purpose

Create an understanding about role of architect in Agile ceremonies.

Key Benefits Achieved

Understanding of the role of the EA architect in Agile ceremonies.

Activities

Outputs

2.1

Document the Agile ceremony used in the organization (based on SAFe or other Agile approaches).

  • Documented the Agile ceremonial used in the organization (based on SAFe or other Agile approaches).
2.2

Determine which ceremonies the system architect will participate in.

  • Determined which ceremonies the system architect will participate in.
2.3

Determine which ceremonies the solution architect will participate in.

  • Determined which ceremonies the solution architect will participate in.
2.4

Determine which ceremonies the enterprise architect will participate in.

  • Determined which ceremonies the enterprise architect will participate in.
2.5

Determine architect syncs, etc.

  • Determined architect syncs, etc.

Design an Enterprise Architecture Strategy

Develop a strategy that fits the organization’s maturity and remains adaptable to unforeseen future changes.

EXECUTIVE BRIEF

Build a right-size enterprise architecture strategy

Enterprise Architecture Strategy

Business & IT Strategy
  • Organizational Goals and Objectives
  • Business Drivers
  • Environment and Industry Trends
  • EA Capabilities and Services
  • Business Architecture
  • Data Architecture
  • Application Architecture
  • Integration Architecture
  • Innovation
  • Roles and Organizational Structure
  • Security Architecture
  • Technology Architecture
  • Integration Architecture
  • Insight and Knowledge
  • EA Operating Model
Unlock the Value of Architecture
  • Increased Business and IT Alignment
  • Robust, Flexible, Scalable, Interoperable, Extensible and Reliable Solutions
  • Timely/Agile Service Delivery and Operations
  • Cost-Effective Solutions
  • Appropriate Risk Management to Address the Risk Appetite
  • Increased Competitive Advantage
Current Environment
  • Business and IT Challenges
  • Opportunities
  • Enterprise Architecture Maturity

Enterprise Architecture – Thought Model

A thought model built around 'Enterprise Architecture', represented by a diagram on a cross-section of a ship which will be explained in the next slide. It begins with an arrow that says 'Organizational goals are the driving force and the ultimate goal' pointing to a bubble titled 'Organization' containing 'Analysis', 'Decisions', 'Actions'. An blue arrow on the right side with one '$' is labelled 'Iterations' and connects 'Organization' to 'Enterprise Architecture', 'Enterprise architecture creates new business value'. A green arrow on the left side with five '$' is labelled 'Goals' and connects back to 'Organization'. A the bottom, a bubble titled 'External forces, pressures, trends, data, etc.' has a blue arrow on the right side with one '$' connecting back to 'Enterprise Architecture'. Another blue arrow representing an output is labelled 'Outcomes' and originates from 'Enterprise Architecture'.

Enterprise Architecture Capabilities

A diagram on a cross-section of a ship representing 'Enterprise Architecture', including a row of process arrows beneath the ship pointing forward all labelled 'Agile iteration' and one airborne arrow above the stern pointing forward labelled 'Business Strategy'. Overlaid on the ship, starting at the back, are 'EA Strategy', 'EA Operating Model', 'Enterprise Principles, Methods, etc.', 'Foundational enterprise decisions: Business, Data/Apps, Technology, Integration, Security', 'Enterprise Reference Architecture', 'Goals, Value Chain, Capability, Business Processes', 'Enterprise Governance (e.g., Standard Mgmt.)', 'Domain Arch', 'Data & App Architecture', 'Security Architecture', 'Infrastructure: Cloud, Hybrid, etc.', at the very front is 'Implementation', and running along the bottom from back to front is 'Operations, Monitoring, and Continuous Improvement'.

Analyst Perspective

Enterprise architecture (EA) needs to be right-sized for the needs of the organization.

Photo of Milena Litoiu, Principal/Senior Director, Enterprise Architecture, Info-Tech Research Group

Enterprise architecture is NOT a one-size-fits-all endeavor. It needs to be right-sized to the needs of the organization.

Enterprise architects are boots on the ground and part of the solution; in addition, they need to have a good understanding of the corporate strategy, vision, and goals and have a vested interest on the optimization of the outcomes for the enterprise. They also need to anticipate the moves ahead, to be able to determine future trends and how they will impact the enterprise.

Milena Litoiu
Principal/Senior Director, Enterprise Architecture
Info-Tech Research Group

Analyst Perspective

EA provides business options based on a deep understanding of the organization.

“Enterprise architects need to think about and consider different areas of expertise when formulating potential business options. By understanding the context, the puzzle pieces can combine to create a positive business outcome that aligns with the organization’s strategies. Sometimes there will be missing pieces; leveraging what you know to create an outline of the pieces and collaborating with others can provide a general direction.”

Jean Bujold
Senior Workshop Delivery Director
Info-Tech Research Group

“The role of enterprise architecture is to eliminate misalignment between the business and IT and create value for the organization.”

Reddy Doddipalli
Senior Workshop Director, Research
Info-Tech Research Group

“Every transformation journey is an opportunity to learn: ‘Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.’ Benjamin Franklin.”

Graham Smith
Senior Lead Enterprise Architect and Independent Consultant

Develop an enterprise architecture strategy that:

  • Helps the organization make decisions that are hard to change in a complex environment.
  • Fits the current organization’s maturity and remains flexible and adaptable to unforeseen future changes.

Executive Summary

Your Challenge

We need to make decisions today for an unknown future. Decisions are influenced by:

  • Changes in the environment you operate in.
  • Complexity of both the business and IT landscapes.
  • IT’s difficulty in keeping up with business demands and remaining agile.
  • Program/project delivery pressure and long-term planning needs.
  • Other internal and external factors affecting your enterprise.

Common Obstacles

Decisions are often made:

  • Without a clear understanding of the business goals.
  • Without a holistic understanding; sometimes in conflict with one another.
  • That hinder the continuity of the organization.
  • That prevent value optimization at the enterprise level.

The more complex an organization, the more players involved, the more difficult it is to overcome these obstacles.

Info-Tech’s Approach

  • Is a holistic, top-down approach, from the business goals all the way to implementation.
  • Has EA act as the canary in the coal mine. EA will identify and mitigate risks in the organization.
  • Enables EA to provide an essential service rather than be an isolated kingdom or an ivory tower.
  • Acknowledges that EA is a balancing act among competing demands.
  • Makes decisions using guiding principles and guardrails, to create a flexible architecture that can evolve and expand, enabling enterprise agility.

Info-Tech Insight

There is no “right architecture” for organizations of all sizes, maturities, and cultural contexts. The value of enterprise architecture can only be measured against the business goals of a single organization. Enterprise architecture needs to be right-sized for your organization.

Info-Tech insight summary on arch. agility

Continuous innovation is of paramount importance in achieving and maintaining competitive advantage in the marketplace.

Business engagement

It is important to trace architectural decisions to business goals. As business goals evolve, architecture should evolve as well.

As new business input is provided during Agile cycles, architecture is continuously evolving.

EA fundamentals

EA fundamentals will shape how enterprise architects think and act, how they engage with the organization, what decisions they make, etc.

Start small and lean and evolve as needed.

Continuously align strategy with delivery and operations.

Architects should establish themselves as business partners as well as implementation/delivery leaders.

Enterprise services

Definitions of enterprise services should start from the business goals of the organization and the capabilities IT needs to perform for the organization to survive in the marketplace.

Continuous delivery and continuous innovation are the two facets of architecture.

Tactical insight

Your current maturity should be reflected as a baseline in the strategy.

Tactical insight

Take Agile/opportunistic steps toward your strategic North star.

Tactical insight

EA services differ based on goals, maturity, and the Agile appetite of the enterprise.

From the best industry experts

“The trick to getting value from enterprise architecture is to commit to the long haul.”

Jeanne W. Ross, MIT CISR
Co-author of Enterprise Architecture as Strategy: Creating a Foundation for Business Execution,
Harvard Business Press, 2006.

Typical EA maturity stages

A line chart that moves through multiple stages titled 'Enterprise Architecture Maturity Stages (MIT CISR)' The five stages of the chart, starting on the left, are 'Business Silos', 'Standardized Technology', 'Optimized Core', 'Business Componentization', and 'Digital Ecosystem'. 'The trick to getting value from enterprise architecture is to commit to the long haul.' The line begins at the bottom left of the chart and gradually creates a stretched S shape to the top right. Points along the line, respective to the aforementioned stages, are 'Locally Optimal Business Solutions', 'Technology Infrastructure Platform', 'Digitized Process Platform', 'Repository of Reusable Business Components', 'Components Connecting with Partners' Components', and at the end of the line, outside of the chart is 'Strategic Business Value from Technology'. Percentages along the bottom, respective to the aforementioned stages, read 20%, 36%, 45%, 7%, 2%. Percentages are rough approximations based on findings reported in Mocker, M., Ross, J.W., Beath, C.M., 'How Companies Use Digital Technologies to Enhance Customer Offerings--Summary of Survey Findings,' MIT CISR Working Paper No. 434, Feb. 2019. Copyright MIT, 2019.

Enterprise Architecture maturity

A maturity ladder visualization for 'Enterprise Architecture' with five color-coded levels. From the bottom up, the colors and designations are Red: 'Unstable', Orange: 'Firefighter', Yellow: 'Trusted Operator', Blue: 'Business Partner', and Green: 'Innovator'. Beside the visualization at the bottom it says 'EA is here', then an arrow in the direction of the top where it says 'EA needs to be here'.
  • Innovator – Transforms the Business
    Reliable Technology Innovation
  • Business Partner – Expands the Business
    Effective Use of Enterprise Architecture in all Business Projects, Enterprise Architecture Is Strategically Engaged
  • Trusted Operator – Optimizes the Business
    Enterprise Architecture Provides Business, Data, Application & Technology Architectures for All IT Projects
  • Firefighter – Supports the Business
    Reliable Architecture for Some Practices/Projects
  • Unstable – Struggles to Support
    Inability to Provide Reliable Architectures

Info-Tech Insight

There is no “absolute maturity” for organizations of all sizes, maturities, and cultural contexts. The maturity of enterprise architecture can only be measured against the business goals of the organization.

Info-Tech offers various levels of support to best suit your needs

DIY Toolkit

Guided Implementation

Workshop

Consulting

"Our team has already made this critical project a priority, and we have the time and capability, but some guidance along the way would be helpful." "Our team knows that we need to fix a process, but we need assistance to determine where to focus. Some check-ins along the way would help keep us on track." "We need to hit the ground running and get this project kicked off immediately. Our team has the ability to take this over once we get a framework and strategy in place." "Our team does not have the time or the knowledge to take this project on. We need assistance through the entirety of this project."

Diagnostics and consistent frameworks used throughout all four options

Workshop Overview

Contact your account representative for more information.
workshops@infotech.com1-888-670-8889

Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 Session 4 Session 5
Activities
Identify organizational needs and landscape

1.0 Interview stakeholders to identify business and technology needs

1.1 Review organization perspective, including business needs, challenges, and strategic directions

1.2 Conduct PESTLE analysis to identify business and technology trends

1.3 Conduct SWOT analysis to identify business and technology internal perspective

Create the EA value proposition

2.1 Identify and prioritize EA stakeholders

2.2 Create business and technology drivers from needs

2.3 Define the EA value proposition

2.4 Identify EA maturity and target

Define the EA fundamentals

3.1 Define the EA goals and objectives

3.2 Determine EA scope

3.3 Create a set of EA principles

3.4. Define the need of a methodology/agility

3.5 Create the EA vision and mission statement

Identify the EA framework and communicate the EA strategy

4.1 Define initial EA operating model and governance mechanism

4.2 Define the activities and services the EA function will provide, derived from business goals

4.3 Determine effectiveness measures

4.4 Create EA roadmap and next steps

4.5 Build communication plan for stakeholders

Next Steps and Wrap-Up (offsite)

5.1 Generate workshop report

5.2 Set up review time for workshop report and to discuss next steps

Outcomes
  1. Stakeholder insights
  2. Organizational needs, challenges, and direction summary
  3. PESTLE & SWOT analysis
  1. Stakeholder power map
  2. List of business and technology drivers with associated pains
  3. Set of EA contributions articulating the promises of value in the EA value proposition
  4. EA maturity assessment
  1. EA scope
  2. List of EA principles
  3. EA vision statement
  4. EA mission statement
  5. Statement about role of enterprise architect relative to agility
  1. EA capabilities mapped to business goals of the organization
  2. List of EA activities and services the EA function is committed to providing
  3. KPI definitions
  4. EA roadmap
  5. EA communication plan
  1. Completed workshop report on EA strategy with roadmap, recommendations, and outcomes from workshop

Guided Implementation

A Guided Implementation (GI) is a series of calls with an Info-Tech analyst to help implement our best practices in your organization.

A typical GI is 8 to 12 calls over the course of 4 to 6 months.

While variations depend on the maturity of the organization as well as its aspirations, these are some typical steps:

    Phase 1

  • Call #1: Explore the role of EA in your organization.
  • Phase 2

  • Call #2: Identify and prioritize stakeholders.
  • Call #3: Use a PESTLE analysis to identify business and technology needs.
  • Call #4: Prepare for stakeholder interviews.
  • Call #5: Discuss your EA value proposition.
  • Phase 3

  • Call #5: Understand the importance of EA fundamentals.
  • Call #6: Define the relevant EA services and their contributions to the organization.
  • Call #7: Measure EA effectiveness.
  • Phase 4

  • Call #8: Build your EA roadmap and communication plan.
  • Call #9: Discuss the EA role relative to agility.
  • Call #10: Summarize results and plan next steps.

Design an Enterprise Architecture Strategy

Phase 1

Explore the Role of Enterprise Architecture

Phase 1

  • 1.1 Explore a general EA strategy approach
  • 1.2 Introduce Agile EA architecture

Phase 2

  • 2.1 Define the business and technology drivers
  • 2.2 Define your value proposition

Phase 3

  • 3.1 Realize the importance of EA fundamentals
  • 3.2 Finalize the EA fundamentals

Phase 4

  • 4.1 Select relevant EA services
  • 4.2 Finalize the set of services and secure approval

This phase will walk you through the following activities:

Define the role of the group and different roles inside the enterprise architecture competency.

This phase involves the following participants:

  • CIO
  • IT Leaders
  • Business Leaders

Enterprise architecture optimizes the outcomes of the entire organization

Corporate Strategy –› Enterprise Architecture Strategy

Info-Tech Insight

Enterprise architecture needs to have input from the corporate strategy of the organization. Similarly, EA governance needs to be informed by corporate governance. If this is not the case, it is like planning and governing with your eyes closed.

Existing EA functions vary in the value they achieve due to their level of maturity

EA Functions
Operationalized
  • EA function is operationalized and operates as an effective core function.
  • Effectively aligns the business and IT through governance, communication, and engagement.
–––› Common EA value
Decreased cost Reduced risk
Emerging
  • Emerging but limited ad hoc EA function.
  • Limited by lack of alignment to the business and IT.
–x–› Cut through complexity Increased agility
(Source: Booz & Co., 2009)

Benefits of enterprise architecture

  1. Focuses on business outcomes (business centricity)
  2. Provides traceability of architectural decisions to/from business goals
  3. Provides ways to measure results
  4. Provides consistency across different lines of business: establishes a common vocabulary, reducing inconsistencies
  5. Reduces duplications, creating additional efficiencies at the enterprise level
  6. Presents an actionable migration to the strategy/vision, through short-term milestones/steps

Benefits of enterprise architecture continued

  1. Done right, increases agility
  2. Done right, reduces costs
  3. Done right, mitigates risks
  4. Done right, stimulates innovation
  5. Done right, helps achieve the stated business goals (e.g. customer satisfaction) and improves the enterprise agility.
  6. Done right, enhances competitive advantage of the enterprise

About Info-Tech

Info-Tech Research Group is the world’s fastest-growing information technology research and advisory company, proudly serving over 30,000 IT professionals.

We produce unbiased and highly relevant research to help CIOs and IT leaders make strategic, timely, and well-informed decisions. We partner closely with IT teams to provide everything they need, from actionable tools to analyst guidance, ensuring they deliver measurable results for their organizations.

MEMBER RATING

9.4/10
Overall Impact

$65,310
Average $ Saved

32
Average Days Saved

After each Info-Tech experience, we ask our members to quantify the real-time savings, monetary impact, and project improvements our research helped them achieve.

Read what our members are saying

What Is a Blueprint?

A blueprint is designed to be a roadmap, containing a methodology and the tools and templates you need to solve your IT problems.

Each blueprint can be accompanied by a Guided Implementation that provides you access to our world-class analysts to help you get through the project.

Need Extra Help?
Speak With An Analyst

Get the help you need in this 4-phase advisory process. You'll receive 11 touchpoints with our researchers, all included in your membership.

Guided Implementation 1: Explore the role of enterprise architecture
  • Call 1: Explore the role of EA in your organization.

Guided Implementation 2: Create the value proposition
  • Call 1: Identify and prioritize stakeholders.
  • Call 2: Use a PESTLE analysis to identify business and technology needs.
  • Call 3: Prepare for stakeholder interviews.
  • Call 4: Discuss your EA value proposition.

Guided Implementation 3: Build the EA fundamentals
  • Call 1: Understand the importance of EA fundamentals.
  • Call 2: Define the relevant EA services and their contributions to the organization.
  • Call 3: Measure EA effectiveness.

Guided Implementation 4: Design the EA services
  • Call 1: Build your EA roadmap and communication plan.
  • Call 2: Discuss the EA role relative to agility.
  • Call 3: Summarize results and plan next steps.

Author

Milena Litoiu

Contributors

  • Lan Nguyen, IT Executive, Mentor, Managing Partner at CIOs Beyond Borders Group
  • Wayne Filin-Matthews, Chief Enterprise Architect, ICMG Winner of Global Chief Enterprise Architect of the Year 2019
  • Graham Smith, Experienced lead Enterprise Architect and Independent Consultant
Visit our Exponential IT Research Center
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