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Create a Service Management Roadmap

Implement service management in an order that makes sense.

  • Inconsistent adoption of holistic practices has led to a chaotic service delivery model that results in poor customer satisfaction.
  • There is little structure, formalization, or standardization in the way IT services are designed and managed, leading to diminishing service quality and low business satisfaction.

Our Advice

Critical Insight

  • Having effective service management practices in place will allow you to pursue activities, such as innovation, and drive the business forward.
  • Addressing foundational elements like business alignment and management practices will enable you to build effective core practices that deliver business value.
  • Providing consistent leadership support and engagement is essential to allow practitioners to focus on delivering expected outcomes.

Impact and Result

  • Understand the foundational and core elements that allow you to build a successful service management practice focused on outcomes.
  • Use Info-Tech’s advice and tools to perform an assessment of your organization’s current state, identify the gaps, and create a roadmap for success.
  • Increase business and customer satisfaction by delivering services focused on creating business value.

Create a Service Management Roadmap Research & Tools

Start here – read the Executive Brief

Read our concise Executive Brief to find out why many service management maturity projects fail to address foundational and core elements, review Info-Tech’s methodology, and understand the four ways we can support you in completing this project.

1. Launch the project

Kick-off the project and complete the project charter.

3. Build the roadmap

Build your roadmap with identified initiatives.

4. Build the communication slide

Create the communication slide that demonstrates how things will change, both short and long term.


Member Testimonials

After each Info-Tech experience, we ask our members to quantify the real-time savings, monetary impact, and project improvements our research helped them achieve. See our top member experiences for this blueprint and what our clients have to say.

9.1/10


Overall Impact

$88,128


Average $ Saved

23


Average Days Saved

Client

Experience

Impact

$ Saved

Days Saved

Omaha Public Power District

Workshop

9/10

$259K

110

Best part: Team engagement and learnings from Info-Tech expertise Worst part: Time commitment

County Of Kenosha

Workshop

10/10

$12,999

10

We had a small-ish group of us, so it was nice to be able to talk through a lot of the topics and make sure everyone's voice was heard.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

N/A

Valence’s depth of knowledge and his vast experience in service mgmt combined with his commitment to achieve the right outcomes for the ABC made i... Read More

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

N/A

Found the work we are currently doing with was very productive and valuable - greatly appreciate the approach and engagement style from Valence inc... Read More

Grinnell College

Workshop

9/10

N/A

N/A

Best - generation of conversations and bringing to light experiences and examples from the team. Worst - if I had to pick something, perhaps the r... Read More

Alabama Department Of Human Resources

Workshop

9/10

N/A

5

The best part of the workshop was bringing awareness and understanding to my team about the importance of ITSM. Overall the workshop was great! At ... Read More

TriMet

Workshop

4/10

N/A

1

Folks uniformly say that we wish we'd spent more time on the roadmap. We can't understand why that work was left so late. There was too much focus ... Read More

Fairbanks Morse Defense

Guided Implementation

9/10

$2,393

5

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Workshop

10/10

$12,599

5

Never enough time for training!

Waterloo Region District School Board

Workshop

10/10

N/A

5

Red Hat, Inc.

Workshop

8/10

N/A

N/A

Denis did a nice job of balancing the varying maturity levels across the organizations participating in the workshop, and did great with synthesizi... Read More

Federated Co-operatives Limited

Workshop

9/10

$100K

20

Joe was an excellent facilitator! Conversation and discussion is a huge part of the value. Really enjoyed it, and we look forward to carrying fo... Read More

The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

10

Motor Oil

Guided Implementation

9/10

$16,905

4

Waterloo Region District School Board

Guided Implementation

9/10

N/A

20

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Workshop

10/10

$300K

75

Best part of the experience was to do the workshop as a team, the worst part is not being able to include others due to calendar, logistics. Very ... Read More

CNSI

Workshop

7/10

N/A

N/A

The workshop helped identify some overarching themes that need our attention within our organization and this was extremely useful. The initial par... Read More

Darling Ingredients

Guided Implementation

9/10

N/A

N/A

Discussion the topic gave clarity on where we have to start to ensure we make positive progress.

Michigan State Court Administrative Office (SCAO)

Guided Implementation

10/10

$64,999

115

Highly experienced advisor was able to quickly understand my needs and hit me right where my needs are today.

4Wall Entertainment

Workshop

10/10

$12,399

20

Daifuku North America Holding Company

Workshop

10/10

$61,999

50

Our facilitators were fantastic. Very passionate and very engaging.

Cross Country Mortgage, Inc.

Guided Implementation

10/10

$30,999

5

Valence did a great job of introducing us to ITSM concepts and helped us come up with a logical starting point for our initiative. Very helpful.

Explore Edmonton Co. (ECC)

Guided Implementation

10/10

$37,500

50

Equitrans Midstream Corporation

Guided Implementation

10/10

$2,519

5

Jack Henry & Associates Inc

Guided Implementation

9/10

$2,412

5

No worst parts. The initial call was very helpful in validating our high-level approach, and giving us additional things to consider. It was clea... Read More

State of Montana ITSD

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

N/A

Excellent discussion. Thank you!

City of Fort Myers, FL

Workshop

10/10

N/A

N/A

SCL Health

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

N/A

Nexteer Automotive

Workshop

10/10

N/A

50

Arkansas Department of Transportation

Guided Implementation

10/10

$382K

75

The guidance and expert knowledge transfer have been crucial to our initial success and long-term sustainability.


Service Management

Know where you are, where to start, and how to get there.
This course makes up part of the Service Planning & Architecture Certificate.

Now Playing:
Academy: Service Management | Executive Brief

An active membership is required to access Info-Tech Academy
  • Course Modules: 4
  • Estimated Completion Time: 2-2.5 hours
  • Featured Analysts:
  • Paul Brown, Sr. Research Director, CIO Practice
  • James Alexander, SVP of Research and Advisory, CIO Practice

Workshop: Create a Service Management Roadmap

Workshops offer an easy way to accelerate your project. If you are unable to do the project yourself, and a Guided Implementation isn't enough, we offer low-cost delivery of our project workshops. We take you through every phase of your project and ensure that you have a roadmap in place to complete your project successfully.

Module 1: Understand Service Management

The Purpose

Understand service management.

Key Benefits Achieved

Gain a common understanding of service management, the forces that impact your roadmap, and the Info-Tech Service Management Maturity Model.

Activities

Outputs

1.1

Understand service management.

  • Constraints and enablers chart
1.2

Build a compelling vision and mission.

  • Service management vision, mission, and values

Module 2: Assess the Current State of Service Management

The Purpose

  • Assess the organization’s current service management capabilities.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • Understand attitudes, behaviors, and culture.
  • Understand governance and process ownership needs.
  • Understand strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.
  • Defined desired state.

Activities

Outputs

2.1

Assess cultural ABCs.

  • Cultural improvements action items
2.2

Assess governance needs.

  • Governance action items
2.3

Perform SWOT analysis.

  • SWOT analysis action items
2.4

Define desired state.

  • Defined desired state

Module 3: Continue Current-State Assessment

The Purpose

  • Assess the organization’s current service management capabilities.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • Understand the current maturity of service management processes.
  • Understand organizational change management capabilities.

Activities

Outputs

3.1

Perform service management process maturity assessment.

  • Service management process maturity activities
3.2

Complete OCM capability assessment.

  • OCM action items
3.3

Identify roadmap themes.

  • Roadmap themes

Module 4: Build Roadmap and Communication Tool

The Purpose

  • Use outputs from previous steps to build your roadmap and communication one-pagers.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • Easy-to-understand roadmap one-pager
  • Communication one-pager

Activities

Outputs

4.1

Build roadmap one-pager.

  • Service management roadmap
4.2

Build communication one-pager.

  • Service management roadmap – Brought to Life communication slide

Create a Service Management Roadmap

Implement service management in an order that makes sense.

ANALYST PERSPECTIVE

"More than 80% of the larger enterprises we’ve worked with start out wanting to develop advanced service management practices without having the cultural and organizational basics or foundational practices fully in place. Although you wouldn’t think this would be the case in large enterprises, again and again IT leaders are underestimating the importance of cultural and foundational aspects such as governance, management practices, and understanding business value. You must have these fundamentals right before moving on."

Tony Denford,

Research Director – CIO

Info-Tech Research Group

Our understanding of the problem

This Research Is Designed For:

  • CIO
  • Senior IT Management

This Research Will Help You:

  • Create or maintain service management (SM) practices to ensure user-facing services are delivered seamlessly to business users with minimum interruption.
  • Increase the level of reliability and availability of the services provided to the business and improve the relationship and communication between IT and the business.

This Research Will Also Assist

  • Service Management Process Owners

This Research Will Help Them:

  • Formalize, standardize, and improve the maturity of service management practices.
  • Identify new service management initiatives to move IT to the next level of service management maturity.

Executive summary

Situation

  • Inconsistent adoption of holistic practices has led to a chaotic service delivery model that results in poor customer satisfaction.
  • There is little structure, formalization, or standardization in the way IT services are designed and managed, leading to diminishing service quality and low business satisfaction.

Complication

  • IT organizations want to be seen as strategic partners, but they fail to address the cultural and organizational constraints.
  • Without alignment with the business goals, services often fail to provide the expected value.
  • Traditional service management approaches are not adaptable for new ways of working.

Resolution

  • Follow Info-Tech’s methodology to create a service management roadmap that will help guide the optimization of your IT services and improve IT’s value to the business.
  • The blueprint will help you right-size your roadmap to best suit your specific needs and goals and will provide structure, ownership, and direction for service management.
  • This blueprint allows you to accurately identify the current state of service management at your organization. Customize the roadmap and create a plan to achieve your target service management state.

Info-Tech Insight

Having effective service management practices in place will allow you to pursue activities such as innovation and drive the business forward. Addressing foundational elements like business alignment and management practices will enable you to build effective core practices that deliver business value. Consistent leadership support and engagement is essential to allow practitioners to focus on delivering expected outcomes.

Poor service management manifests in many different pains across the organization

Immaturity in service management will not result in one pain – rather, it will create a chaotic environment for the entire organization, crippling IT’s ability to deliver and perform.

Low Service Management Maturity

These are some of the pains that can be attributed to poor service management practices.

  • Frequent service-impacting incidents
  • Low satisfaction with the service desk
  • High % of failed deployments
  • Frequent change-related incidents
  • Frequent recurring incidents
  • Inability to find root cause
  • No communication with the business
  • Frequent capacity-related incidents

And there are many more…

Mature service management practices are a necessity, not a nice-to-have

Immature service management practices are one of the biggest hurdles preventing IT from reaching its true potential.

In 2004, PwC published a report titled “IT Moves from Cost Center to Business Contributor.” However, the 2014-2015 CSC Global CIO Survey showed that a high percentage of IT is still considered a cost center.

And low maturity of service management practices is inhibiting activities such as agility, DevOps, digitalization, and innovation.

A pie chart is shown that is titled: Where does IT sit? The chart has 3 sections. One section represents IT and the business have a collaborative partnership 28%. The next section represents at 33% where IT has a formal client/service provider relationship with the business. The last section has 39% where IT is considered as a cost center.
Source: CSC Global CIO Survey: 2014-2015 “CIOs Emerge as Disruptive Innovators”

39%: Resources are primarily focused on managing existing IT workloads and keeping the lights on.

31%: Too much time and too many resources are used to handle urgent incidents and problems.

There are many misconceptions about what service management is

Misconception #1: “Service management is a process”

Effective service management is a journey that encompasses a series of initiatives that improves the value of services delivered.

Misconception #2: “Service Management = Service Desk”

Service desk is the foundation, since it is the main end-user touch point, but service management is a set of people and processes required to deliver business-facing services.

Misconception #3: “Service management is about the ITSM tool”

The tool is part of the overall service management program, but the people and processes must be in place before implementing.

Misconception #4: “Service management development is one big initiative”

Service management development is a series of initiatives that takes into account an organization’s current state, maturity, capacities, and objectives.

Misconception #5: “Service management processes can be deployed in any order, assuming good planning and design”

A successful service management program takes into account the dependencies of processes.

Misconception #6: “Service management is resolving incidents and deploying changes”

Service management is about delivering high-value and high-quality services.

Misconception #7: “Service management is not the key determinant of success”

As an organization progresses on the service management journey, its ability to deliver high-value and high-quality services increases.

Misconception #8: “Resolving Incidents = Success”

Preventing incidents is the name of the game.

Misconception #9: “Service Management = Good Firefighter”

Service management is about understanding what’s going on with user-facing services and proactively improving service quality.

Misconception #10: “Service management is about IT and technical services (e.g. servers, network, database)”

Service management is about business/user-facing services and the value the services provide to the business.

Service management projects often don’t succeed because they are focused on process rather than outcomes

Service management projects tend to focus on implementing process without ensuring foundational elements of culture and management practices are strong enough to support the change.

  1. Aligning your service management goals with your organizational objectives leads to better understanding of the expected outcomes.
  2. Understand your customers and what they value, and design your practices to deliver this value.

  3. IT does not know what order is best when implementing new practices or process improvements.
  4. Don't run before you can walk. Fundamental practices must reach the maturity threshold before developing advanced practices. Implement continuous improvement on your existing processes so they continue to support new practices.

  5. IT does not follow best practices when implementing a practice.
  6. Our best-practice research is based on extensive experience working with clients through advisory calls and workshops.

Info-Tech can help you create a customized, low-effort, and high-value service management roadmap that will shore up any gaps, prove IT’s value, and achieve business satisfaction.

Info-Tech’s methodology will help you customize your roadmap so the journey is right for you

With Info-Tech, you will find out where you are, where you want to go, and how you will get there.

With our methodology, you can expect the following:

  • Eliminate or reduce rework due to poor execution.
  • Identify dependencies/prerequisites and ensure practices are deployed in the correct order, at the correct time, and by the right people.
  • Engage all necessary resources to design and implement required processes.
  • Assess current maturity and capabilities and design the roadmap with these factors in mind.

Doing it right the first time around

You will see these benefits at the end

    ✓ Increase the quality of services IT provides to the business.

    ✓ Increase business satisfaction through higher alignment of IT services.

    ✓ Lower cost to design, implement, and manage services.

    ✓ Better resource utilization, including staff, tools, and budget.

Focus on a strong foundation to build higher value service management practices

Info-Tech Insight

Focus on behaviors and expected outcomes before processes.

Foundational elements

  • Operating model facilitates service management goals
  • Culture of service delivery
  • Governance discipline to evaluate, direct, and monitor
  • Management discipline to deliver

Stabilize

  • Deliver stable, reliable IT services to the business
  • Respond to user requests quickly and efficiently
  • Resolve user issues in a timely manner
  • Deploy changes smoothly and successfully

Proactive

  • Avoid/prevent service disruptions
  • Improve quality of service (performance, availability, reliability)

Service Provider

  • Understand business needs
  • Ensure services are available
  • Measure service performance, based on business-oriented metrics

Strategic Partner

  • Fully aligned with business
  • Drive innovation
  • Drive measurable value

Info-Tech Insight

Continued leadership support of the foundational elements will allow delivery teams to provide value to the business. Set the expectation of the desired maturity level and allow teams to innovate.

Follow our model and get to your target state

A model is depicted that shows the various target states. There are 6 levels showing in the example, and the example is made to look like a tree with a character watering it. In the roots, the level is labelled foundational. The trunk is labelled the core. The lowest hanging branches of the tree is the stabilize section. Above it is the proactive section. Nearing the top of the tree is the service provider. The canopy of the tree are labelled strategic partner.

Before moving to advanced service management practices, you must ensure that the foundational and core elements are robust enough to support them. Leadership must nurture these practices to ensure they are sustainable and can support higher value, more mature practices.

Each step along the way, Info-Tech has the tools to help you

Phase 1: Launch the Project

Assemble a team with the right talent and vision to increase the chances of project success.

Phase 2: Assess Current State

Understand where you are currently on the service management journey using the maturity assessment tool.

Phase 3: Build Roadmap

Based on the assessments, build a roadmap to address areas for improvement.

Phase 4: Build Communication slide

Based on the roadmap, define the current state, short- and long-term visions for each major improvement area.

Info-Tech Deliverables:

  • Project Charter
  • Assessment Tools
  • Roadmap Template
  • Communication Template

CIO call to action

Improving the maturity of the organization’s service management practice is a big commitment, and the project can only succeed with active support from senior leadership.

Ideally, the CIO should be the project sponsor, even the project leader. At a minimum, the CIO needs to perform the following activities:

  1. Walk the talk – demonstrate personal commitment to the project and communicate the benefits of the service management journey to IT and the steering committee.
  2. Improving or adopting any new practice is difficult, especially for a project of this size. Thus, the CIO needs to show visible support for this project through internal communication and dedicated resources to help complete this project.

  3. Select a senior, capable, and results-driven project leader.
  4. Most likely, the implementation of this project will be lengthy and technical in some nature. Therefore, the project leader must have a good understanding of the current IT structure, senior standing within the organization, and the relationship and power in place to propel people into action.

  5. Help to define the target future state of IT’s service management.
  6. Determine a realistic target state for the organization based on current capability and resource/budget restraints.

  7. Conduct periodic follow-up meetings to keep track of progress.
  8. Reinforce or re-emphasize the importance of this project to the organization through various communication channels if needed.

Stabilizing your environment is a must before establishing any more-mature processes

CASE STUDY

Industry: Manufacturing

Source: Engagement

Challenge

  • The business landscape was rapidly changing for this manufacturer and they wanted to leverage potential cost savings from cloud-first initiatives and consolidate multiple, self-run service delivery teams that were geographically dispersed.

Solution

Original Plan

  • Consolidate multiple service delivery teams worldwide and implement service portfolio management.

Revised Plan with Service Management Roadmap:

  • Markets around the world had very different needs and there was little understanding of what customers value.
  • There was also no understanding of what services were currently being offered within each geography.

Results

  • Plan was adjusted to understand customer value and services offered.
  • Services were then stabilized and standardized before consolidation.
  • Team also focused on problem maturity and drove a continuous improvement culture and increasing transparency.

MORAL OF THE STORY:

Understanding the value of each service allowed the organization to focus effort on high-return activities rather than continuous fire fighting.

Understand the processes involved in the proactive phase

CASE STUDY

Industry: Manufacturing

Source: Engagement

Challenge

  • Services were fairly stable, but there were significant recurring issues for certain services.
  • The business was not satisfied with the service quality for certain services, due to periodic availability and reliability issues.
  • Customer feedback for the service desk was generally good.

Solution

Original Plan

  • Review all service desk and incident management processes to ensure that service issues were handled in an effective manner.

Revised Plan with Service Management Roadmap:

  • Design and deploy a rigorous problem management process to determine the root cause of recurring issues.
  • Monitor key services for events that may lead to a service outage.

Results

  • Root cause of recurring issues was determined and fixes were deployed to resolve the underlying cause of the issues.
  • Service quality improved dramatically, resulting in high customer satisfaction.

MORAL OF THE STORY:

Make sure that you understand which processes need to be reviewed in order to determine the cause for service instability. Focusing on the proactive processes was the right answer for this company.

Have the right culture and structure in place before you become a service provider

CASE STUDY

Industry: Healthcare

Source:Journal of American Medical Informatics Association

Challenge

  • The IT organization wanted to build a service catalog to demonstrate the value of IT to the business.
  • IT was organized in technology silos and focused on applications, not business services.
  • IT services were not aligned with business activities.
  • Relationships with the business were not well established.

Solution

Original Plan

  • Create and publish a service catalog.

Revised Plan: with Service Management Roadmap:

  • Establish relationships with key stakeholders in the business units.
  • Understand how business activities interface with IT services.
  • Lay the groundwork for the service catalog by defining services from the business perspective.

Results

  • Strong relationships with the business units.
  • Deep understanding of how business activities map to IT services.
  • Service definitions that reflect how the business uses IT services.

MORAL OF THE STORY:

Before you build and publish a service catalog, make sure that you understand how the business is using the IT services that you provide.

Calculate the benefits of using Info-Tech’s methodology

To measure the value of developing your roadmap using the Info-Tech tools and methodology, you must calculate the effort saved by not having to develop the methods.

A. How much time will it take to develop an industry-best roadmap using Info-Tech methodology and tools?

Using Info-Tech’s tools and methodology you can accurately estimate the effort to develop a roadmap using industry-leading research into best practice.

B. What would be the effort to develop the insight, assess your team, and develop the roadmap?

This metric represents the time your team would take to be able to effectively assess themselves and develop a roadmap that will lead to service management excellence.

C. Cost & time saving through Info-Tech’s methodology

Measured Value

Step 1: Assess current state

Cost to assess current state:

  • 5 Directors + 10 Managers x 10 hours at $X an hour = $A

Step 2: Build the roadmap

Cost to create service management roadmap:

  • 5 Directors + 10 Managers x 8 hours at $X an hour = $B

Step 3: Develop the communication slide

Cost to create roadmaps for phases:

  • 5 Directors + 10 Managers x 6 hours at $X an hour = $C

Potential financial savings from using Info-Tech resources:

Estimated cost to do “B” – (Step 1 ($A) + Step 2 ($B) + Step 3 ($C)) = $Total Saving

Info-Tech offers various levels of support to best suit your needs

DIY Toolkit

"Our team has already made this critical project a priority, and we have the time and capability, but some guidance along the way would be helpful."

Guided Implementation

"Our team knows that we need to fix a process, but we need assistance to determine where to focus. Some check-ins along the way would help keeps us on track."

Workshop

"We need to hit the ground running and get this project kicked off immediately. Our team has the ability to take this over once we get a framework and strategy in place."

Consulting

"Our team does not have the time or the knowledge to take this project on. We need assistance through the entirety of this project."

Diagnostics and consistent frameworks are used throughout all four options.

Create a Service Management Roadmap – project overview


Launch the project

Assess the current state

Build the roadmap

Build communication slide

Best-Practice Toolkit

1.1 Create a powerful, succinct mission statement

1.2 Assemble a project team with representatives from all major IT teams

1.3 Determine project stakeholders and create a communication plan

1.4 Establish metrics to track the success of the project

2.1 Assess impacting forces

2.2 Build service management vision, mission, and values

2.3 Assess attitudes, behaviors, and culture

2.4 Assess governance

2.5 Perform SWOT analysis

2.6 Identify desired state

2.7 Assess SM maturity

2.8 Assess OCM capabilities

3.1 Document overall themes

3.2 List individual initiatives

4.1 Document current state

4.2 List future vision

Guided Implementations

  • Kick-off the project
  • Build the project team
  • Complete the charter
  • Understand current state
  • Determine target state
  • Build the roadmap based on current and target state
  • Build short- and long-term visions and initiative list

Onsite Workshop

Module 1: Launch the project

Module 2: Assess current service management maturity

Module 3: Complete the roadmap

Module 4: Complete the communication slide

Workshop overview

Contact your account representative or email Workshops@InfoTech.com for more information

Workshop Day 1

Workshop Day 2

Workshop Day 3

Workshop Day 4

Activities

Understand Service Management

1.1 Understand the concepts and benefits of service management.

1.2 Understand the changing impacting forces that affect your ability to deliver services.

1.3 Build a compelling vision and mission for your service management program.

Assess the Current State of Your Service Management Practice

2.1 Understand attitudes, behaviors, and culture.

2.2 Assess governance and process ownership needs.

2.3 Perform SWOT analysis.

2.4 Define the desired state.

Complete Current-State Assessment

3.1 Conduct service management process maturity assessment.

3.2 Identify organizational change management capabilities.

3.3 Identify themes for roadmap.

Build Roadmap and Communication Tool

4.1 Build roadmap one-pager.

4.2 Build roadmap communication one-pager.

Deliverables

  1. Constraints and enablers chart
  2. Service management vision, mission, and values
  1. Action items for cultural improvements
  2. Action items for governance
  3. Identified improvements from SWOT
  4. Defined desired state
  1. Service Management Process Maturity Assessment
  2. Organizational Change Management Assessment
  1. Service management roadmap
  2. Roadmap Communication Tool in the Service Management Roadmap Presentation Template

About Info-Tech

Info-Tech Research Group is the world’s fastest-growing information technology research and advisory company, proudly serving over 30,000 IT professionals.

We produce unbiased and highly relevant research to help CIOs and IT leaders make strategic, timely, and well-informed decisions. We partner closely with IT teams to provide everything they need, from actionable tools to analyst guidance, ensuring they deliver measurable results for their organizations.

MEMBER RATING

9.1/10
Overall Impact

$88,128
Average $ Saved

23
Average Days Saved

After each Info-Tech experience, we ask our members to quantify the real-time savings, monetary impact, and project improvements our research helped them achieve.

Read what our members are saying

What Is a Blueprint?

A blueprint is designed to be a roadmap, containing a methodology and the tools and templates you need to solve your IT problems.

Each blueprint can be accompanied by a Guided Implementation that provides you access to our world-class analysts to help you get through the project.

Need Extra Help?
Speak With An Analyst

Get the help you need in this 4-phase advisory process. You'll receive 7 touchpoints with our researchers, all included in your membership.

Guided Implementation 1: Launch the project
  • Call 1: Kick-off the project.
  • Call 2: Build the project team.
  • Call 3: Complete the charter.

Guided Implementation 2: Assess the current state
  • Call 1: Understand current state.
  • Call 2: Determine target state.

Guided Implementation 3: Build the roadmap
  • Call 1: Build the roadmap based on current and target state.

Guided Implementation 4: Build communication slide
  • Call 1: Build short- and long-term visions and initiative list.

Author

Tony Denford

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