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Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Turn planning into action with a realistic PMO timeline.

  • Problems with project management offices (PMOs) often start with a lack of a clear definition of what the PMO is actually about and what the organization does.
  • Few organizations provide the minimum required services, and many are not using their PMOs effectively. Many people see the PMO as nothing more than the “project document police,” i.e. a source of red tape rather than a helpful support system. This impacts staffing and hiring.
  • The PMO is often misunderstood as a center for project management governance when it also needs to facilitate the communication of project data from project teams to decision makers to ensure that appropriate decisions get made around resourcing, approval of new projects, etc.
  • Accountability is something that is not clearly defined for many activities that flow through the PMO. Business leaders, project workers, and project managers are rarely as aligned as they need to be.

Our Advice

Critical Insight

  • There is a gap in the perception of the actual role of the PMO in many organizations by different stakeholder groups. Many people see the PMO as police that produce red tape rather than a helpful support system. Those that need to present a coherent plan to leadership to champion the need for a PMO often have an uphill battle.
  • Determine the PMO’s role and needs and then determine your staff needs based on that PMO.
  • Staff the PMO according to its actual role and needs. Don’t rush to the assumption that PMO staff starts with accomplished project managers.
  • The difference in a winning PMO is determined by a roadmap or plan created at the beginning.

Impact and Result

  • Define a PMO with functions that work for you based on the needs of your organization and the gaps in services. A “fit-for-purpose” PMO is the right kind of PMO for your organization.
  • Determine your PMO staffing needs. Our approach to building a PMO starts by analyzing the staffing requirements of your PMO mandate.
  • Create purpose-built role descriptions. Once you understand the staff and skills you’ll need to succeed, we have job description aids you’ll need to fill the roles.

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO Research & Tools

1. Prepare and Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO – An actionable deck to help you establish a valuable PMO.

Before setting up or re-structuring a PMO, organizational need should not only be taken into consideration but used as a foundation. Phase 1 of this blueprint will help you define the services that your PMO should provide to your organization, instead of the one-size-fits-all approach that doesn’t work.

Accountability is something that is not clearly defined for many activities that flow through the PMO. Business leaders, project workers, and PMs are rarely as aligned as they need to be. Phase 2 of this blueprint will help you determine your PMO staffing needs and create meaningful job descriptions.

The difference in a winning PMO is determined by a roadmap or plan created at the beginning. Phase 3 of this blueprint will help you create a realistic plan for your future-state PMO.

2. PMO Role Definition Tool – An Excel tool to help you define the services of your PMO.

Use the PMO Role Definition Tool to establish your PMO current state and the service gaps you may have. Use the results to determine the role your PMO should play within your organization.

3. PMO Project Charter – A template to formalize your PMO and make sure everyone is on the same page.

The PMO Project Charter shares the vision to achieve consensus between stakeholders and projects and initiatives of the PMO. Use this template to jump-start your PMO project.

4. Blank Job Description Template – A template to create different job descriptions from.

Use this template to create your job descriptions from scratch.

5. Portfolio Manager Job Description – A clear and realistic job description template for a Portfolio Manager.

The Portfolio Manager will oversee the business of discovering unsatisfied needs, articulating them as project demand, and organizing appropriate responses. Your customers are the people who approve projects, and you will service them.

6. PMO Job Description Builder Workbook – An Excel tool to help you access PMO staffing requirements.

This tool will help you assess staffing requirements to facilitate project management, business analysis, and organizational change management outcomes.

7. PMO Strategic Plan – A template to help you compose a PMO strategy.

This template will help you compose a PMO strategy. Follow the steps in the blueprint to complete the strategy.

8. Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool – An Excel tool to analyze the impact of change to the organization.

Use the Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool to analyze the effects of a change across the organization, and to assess the likelihood of adoption to right-size your OCM efforts.

9. PMO MS Project Plan – A template to map out timeline for completing the tasks to create your PMO.

Use this tool to determine the next steps and assign tasks to the appropriate people.


Member Testimonials

After each Info-Tech experience, we ask our members to quantify the real-time savings, monetary impact, and project improvements our research helped them achieve. See our top member experiences for this blueprint and what our clients have to say.

10.0/10


Overall Impact

$251,999


Average $ Saved

47


Average Days Saved

Client

Experience

Impact

$ Saved

Days Saved

Cross Country Mortgage, Inc.

Guided Implementation

10/10

$125K

20

Utah Valley University

Guided Implementation

10/10

$125K

5

Hernando County Clerk of Circuit Court and Comptroller

Guided Implementation

10/10

$503K

115

Choice Properties Limited Partnership

Guided Implementation

10/10

N/A

N/A


Workshop: Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Workshops offer an easy way to accelerate your project. If you are unable to do the project yourself, and a Guided Implementation isn't enough, we offer low-cost delivery of our project workshops. We take you through every phase of your project and ensure that you have a roadmap in place to complete your project successfully.

Module 1: Define

The Purpose

  • Get a common understanding of your PMO options.
  • Determine where you are and engage leadership.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • A clear vision for your PMO and an articulated reason for establishing it.
  • An understanding of you PMO goals and which challenges it sets to address.

Activities

Outputs

1.1

PPM Current State Scorecard

  • PPM Current State Scorecard Results
1.2

SWOT Analysis

  • SWOT Results
1.3

Current State and Leadership Engagement

  • PMO Role Development Tool
1.4

PMO Mandate and Vision

  • PMO Charter

Module 2: Staff

The Purpose

  • Identify organizational design.
  • Build job descriptions.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • An analysis of staffing requirements of your PMO that aligns with your mandate from phase 1.
  • Job description aids to fill the necessary roles.

Activities

Outputs

2.1

Right, Wrong, Missing, Confusing

  • Right, Wrong, Missing, Confusing Results
2.2

PMO Function, Roles, and Responsibilities

  • Job Description Survey Tool
2.3

Job Descriptions

  • Job Description Templates

Module 3: Plan

The Purpose

  • Create a roadmap.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • An actionable roadmap that can be presented to leadership and implemented.

Activities

Outputs

3.1

Roadmap Hierarchy and Staffing and Sizing

  • PMO Roadmap Draft
3.2

Governance and Authority

  • Governance Authority

Module 4: Change

The Purpose

  • Set up governance and OCM.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • An introduction to the concept of governance and tools for a change impact analysis.

Activities

Outputs

4.1

Analyze the impact of the change across multiple dimensions and stakeholder groups.

  • Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool
4.2

Gain sponsorship.

  • Sponsor Template

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Turn planning into action with a realistic PMO timeline.

EXECUTIVE BRIEF

Analyst Perspective

Prepare an actionable roadmap for your PMO.

Photo of Ugbad Farah, PMP, Senior Research Analyst, PPM, Info-Tech Research Group

We all have junk drawers somewhere in our homes, and we probably try not to think about what’s going on in there. We’re just happy that they close and that the contents are concealed from anyone living in or passing through the house.

What goes in these junk drawers? Things that don’t have a home, things you don’t know what to do with, and things you don’t have the time or desire to deal with. Eventually, the drawer gets full, and it doesn’t serve you anymore because you can’t add anything else to it. Instead of cleaning the drawer and keeping the things you need, you throw everything away in one sweep. One day you will start the process again.

The junk drawer is like your project management office (PMO). The PMO is given projects that are barely scoped, projects that don’t have clear sponsors, and ad hoc administrative tasks you don’t have the time or desire to deal with. Inevitably, your PMO is out of capacity. This happens rather quickly, since it’s understaffed. You question its purpose because you made it a junk drawer. You even think about closing it. One day you will start the process again.

Use this blueprint to stop the madness. Learn how to properly define, staff, and plan a roadmap of a PMO that will actually serve your organization.

Ugbad Farah, PMP
Senior Research Analyst, PPM
Info-Tech Research Group

Your challenge

This research is designed to help organizations that are facing these challenges:

  • No visibility into projects
  • The organization views the PMO as unnecessary overhead
  • The PMO is not properly staffed to support the organization’s needs
  • Project managers/staff aren’t providing information or following processes
  • Leadership and sponsors are disengaged

Pie chart of 'IT Time Allocation by Area'. The grey section on the bottom left represents 'Projects and Project Portfolio Management, 11.5%'.
IT is responsible for many different business services. The data from Info-Tech’s IT Staffing diagnostic shows that 11.5% of staff time is spent on projects and project portfolio management. (Source: Info-Tech IT Staffing Benchmark Report)

PMOs can’t do everything and be all things to all people. Define limits with a strong mandate and effective staffing. Make sure you have the skills and capacity to support required PMO functions.

Project management chaos

PMOs get pulled into the day-to-day project and resourcing issues, making it difficult to focus on running a portfolio:

  1. Teammates seem unphased by overdue tasks and missed milestones.
  2. Fire drills may happen more often than planned projects.
  3. Resources are allocated and then redirected to something more urgent.
  4. Communication that’s stuck in silos, leading to confusion about priorities.
  5. Due dates mysteriously shift without explanation.
  6. Project teams are more focused on the due date than adoption and outcomes.

Common obstacles

IT and PMO leaders face several challenges.

  • Many people see the PMO as nothing more than the “project document police,” i.e. a source of red tape rather than a helpful support system. This impacts staffing and hiring.
  • The PMO is often misunderstood as a center for project management governance, when it also needs to facilitate the communication of project data from project teams to decision makers to ensure that appropriate decisions get made around resourcing, approval of new projects, etc.
  • Accountability is something that is not clearly defined for many activities that flow through the PMO. Business leaders, project workers, and project managers are rarely as aligned as they need to be.

The Reality

68% — Sixty-eight percent of stakeholders see their PMOs as sources of unnecessary bureaucratic red tape. (Source: KeyedIn, 2014)

50% — Fifty percent of PMOs close within the first three years due to such things as poorly defined mandates and poor leadership. (Source: KeyedIn, 2014)

Info-Tech’s approach

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

The Info-Tech difference:

  1. Get a departmental job description first. Defining your PMO may not be as simple as it seems. Explore the boundaries of portfolio, project, resource, and organizational change management before jumping ahead with processes and tools.
  2. The staffing plan should come before your long-term plan. Get buy-in around your definition of the roles needed to run your PMO before articulating a long-term plan. Too often, plans have been accepted without the commensurate level of staffing. Our approach gives you a chance to put hiring on the roadmap as a predecessor to accountability.
  3. Keep your eye on the ball. Build your PMO around the operational imperative to recognize completed projects as an early milestone in broader changes. In other words, projects exist to create change.

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for your PMO

Turn planning into action with a realistic PMO timeline.

50% of PMOs close within the first 3 years.

Logo for Info-Tech.


Logo for ITRG.

01 Define

DEFINE THE RIGHT KIND OF PMO

Establish the purpose of your PMO. Identify organizational needs to fill in gaps instead of duplicating efforts.

LOGICAL FALLACY
“If we approve more work, we'll get more done.”

A properly run portfolio reconciles demand (project requests) to supply (available people) and drives throughput by approving the amount of projects that can get done.

02 Staff

STAFF THE PMO FOR RESILIENCE

Analyze the staffing requirements for your PMOs mandate. Create purpose-built role descriptions.

FALSE ASSUMPTION
“Our best project manager should run the PMO.”

Your best project manager should be running projects and, no, they shouldn't do both.

03 Plan

PREPARE AN ACTIONABLE ROADMAP

The difference in a winning PMO is determined by a roadmap or plan created at the beginning. Leaders should understand the full scope of the plan before committing their teams to the project.

COMMON MISTAKE
“We'll get great at project management now and worry about portfolio management later.”

Too often, PMOs focus on project management rigor and plan to do portfolio management after that's done. But few successfully maintain the process long enough to get there. If you start with portfolio management, leadership might soften their demands for project management rigor.

04 Execute

ALIGN TO STRATEGIC PLAN

Use the power of organizational change management to ensure success and adoption. Iterate through the finer points of planning and execution to deploy the kind of PMO defined in step 1, with the people described in step 2, and the strategic roadmap articulated in step 3.

PROJECT MYOPIA
“Let's focus on delivering the project on time so we can move on to our next project.”

Don't forget why the idea got approved in the first place. The goal is to sustain beneficial business outcomes well beyond the completion of your project.

Info-Tech’s methodology for Preparing an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

1. Define the PMO 2. Staff the PMO 3. Prepare a Roadmap
Phase Steps
  1. Get a Common Understanding of Your PMO Options
  2. Determine Where You Are and Engage Leadership
  1. Identify Organizational Design
  2. Build Job Descriptions
  1. Create Roadmap
  2. Governance and OCM
Phase Outcomes A clear vision for your PMO and an articulated reason for establishing it.
An understanding of your PMO goals and which challenges it sets to address.
An analysis of staffing requirements of your PMO that aligns with your mandate from phase 1. Job descriptions help to fill the necessary roles. An actionable roadmap that can be presented to leadership and implemented. An introduction to the concept of governance and tools for a change impact analysis.

Insight summary

Overarching insight

There is a gap in the perception of the actual role of the PMO in many organizations by different stakeholder groups. Many people see the PMO police that produce red tape rather than a helpful support system. Those that need to present a coherent plan to leadership championing the need for a PMO often have an uphill battle.

Phase 1 insight

Determine the PMO’s role and needs and then determine your staff needs based on that PMO.

PMO leaders are all too often set up to fail, left to make successes out of PMOs that:

  1. have poorly defined mandates;
  2. lack the proper resourcing to support the services the organization requires; or
  3. lack executive leadership, vision, and backing.

Phase 2 insight

Staff the PMO according to its actual role and needs. Don’t rush to the assumption that PMO staff starts with accomplished project managers.

Many organizations have PMOs of one person, and it is simply not a long-term recipe for success. People in this situation have a lot of weight on their shoulders and feel like they are being set up to fail. It is very challenging for anyone to run a PMO alone without support or administrative help.

Phase 3 insight

The difference in a winning PMO is determined by a roadmap or plan created at the beginning.

When you are determining what your PMO will provide in the future, it is important to align the ambition of the PMO with the maturity of the business. Too often, a lot of effort is spent trying to convince businesses of the value of a PMO.

Blueprint deliverables

Each step of this blueprint is accompanied by supporting deliverables to help you accomplish your goals:

PMO Role Definition Tool Sample of the PMO Role Definition Tool deliverable. PMO Project Charter Template Sample of the PMO Project Charter Template deliverable.
Blank Job Description Template
Sample of the Blank Job Description Template deliverable.
Sample Job Descriptions
Sample of the Sample Job Descriptions deliverable.
PMO Job Description Builder Workbook
Sample of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook deliverable.

Blueprint deliverables

Each step of this blueprint is accompanied by supporting deliverables to help you accomplish your goals:

PMO Strategic Plan
Sample of the PMO Strategic Plan deliverable.
PMO MS Project Plan Sample
Sample of the PMO MS Project Plan Sample deliverable.
Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool
Sample of the Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool deliverable.

Benefits

IT Benefits

  • Determine how you can fill gaps and not duplicate efforts to bring value to your organization.
  • Ensure that key PMO capabilities like portfolio management, project management, and organizational change management are in balance.
  • Staffing is purpose-driven. Avoid putting good people in the wrong role.

Business Benefits

  • Intake and governance have a primary focus and are not merely afterthoughts of someone primarily focused on project management methodology.
  • Avoid unrealistic commitments by ensuring better upfront analysis of ability to execute.
  • Ensure appropriately mandated sponsor management.

Info-Tech offers various levels of support to best suit your needs

DIY Toolkit

Guided Implementation

Workshop

Consulting

"Our team has already made this critical project a priority, and we have the time and capability, but some guidance along the way would be helpful." "Our team knows that we need to fix a process, but we need assistance to determine where to focus. Some check-ins along the way would help keep us on track." "We need to hit the ground running and get this project kicked off immediately. Our team has the ability to take this over once we get a framework and strategy in place." "Our team does not have the time or the knowledge to take this project on. We need assistance through the entirety of this project."

Diagnostics and consistent frameworks used throughout all four options

Guided Implementation

A Guided Implementation (GI) is a series of calls with an Info-Tech analyst to help implement our best practices in your organization.

A typical GI is 8 to 12 calls over the course of 4 to 6 months.

What does a typical GI on this topic look like?

    Phase 1

  • Call #1: Scope requirements, objectives, and your specific challenges.
  • Call #2: Assess current state and determine PMO role/type.
  • Call #3: Complete job description survey.
  • Phase 2

  • Call #4: Analyze survey results and complete FTE analysis.
  • Call #5: Discuss necessary roles and create job descriptions.
  • Phase 3

  • Call #6: Discuss business goals and priorities.
  • Call #7: Identify and prioritize initiatives on roadmap.
  • Call #8: Discuss governance and organizational change.
  • Call #9: Summarize results in strategic plan and discuss next steps.

Workshop Overview

Contact your account representative for more information.
workshops@infotech.com1-888-670-8889

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5
Activities
Define

1.1 Review PPM Current State Scorecard Results

1.2 Get a Common Understanding of Your PMO Options

1.3 Conduct SWOT Analysis

1.4 Current State and Leadership Engagement

1.5 PMO Mandate and Vision

Staff

2.1 Identify Organizational Design

2.2 Right, Wrong, Missing, Confusing

2.3 PMO Function, Roles, and Responsibilities

2.4 Job Descriptions

Plan

3.1 Roadmap Top-Level Hierarchy

3.2 Roadmap Second-Level Hierarchy

3.2 Staffing and Sizing

3.3 Reconcile and Finalize Roadmap

3.4 Governance and Authority

Change

4.1 Importance of OCM

4.2 Sponsorship

4.3 Analyze the Impact of the Change Across Multiple Dimensions and Stakeholder Groups

Next Steps and Wrap-Up (offsite)

5.1 Complete in-progress deliverables from previous four days.

5.2 Set up review time for workshop deliverables and to discuss next steps.

Deliverables
  1. PPM Current State Scorecard
  2. SWOT Results
  3. PMO Role Development Tool
  4. PMO Charter
  1. Right, Wrong, Missing, Confusing Results
  2. Job Description Survey Tool
  3. Job Description Templates
  1. PMO Roadmap Draft
  2. Governance and Authority Activity
  1. Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool
  2. Sponsor Template
  1. Completed PMO Roadmap draft
  2. PMO Strategic Plan draft

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Phase 1

Define the Right Kind of PMO

Phase 1

  • 1.1 Get a Common Understanding of Your PMO Options
  • 1.2 Determine Where You Are and Engage Your Leadership

Phase 2

  • 2.1 Identify Organizational Design
  • 2.2. Build Job Descriptions

Phase 3

  • 3.1 Create Roadmap
  • 3.2 Governance and OCM

A PMO may not simply be an office of project managers

Project management offices are evolving and taking on activities that differ from company to company.

1915 1930s 1950s 1980s 1990s
Frederick Taylor introduces the PMO with the implementation of the scientific management method and the increase in the number and complexity of projects. The US Air Corps creates a Project Office function to monitor aircraft development (probably the first record of the term being used). The US military starts developing complex missile systems. Each weapon system was composed of several sub-projects grouped together in system program offices (SPOs). This built the structures underlying the traditional PMO. The Project Office concept exported to construction and IT. The PMO gains a lot of momentum with professional associations and project management certifications becoming recognized industry standards.

Organizations are confused about what a PMO is, whether they should have one, and what it should do

PMBOK

The responsibilities of a PMO can range from providing project management support functions to the direct management of one or more projects. The PMO is an organizational body assigned with various responsibilities related to the centralized and coordinated management of those projects under its domain.

The PMO may play a role in supporting strategic alignment and delivering organizational value, integrating data and information for organizational strategic projects, and evaluating how higher-level strategic objectives are being fulfilled.

COBIT

The PMO can be responsible for portfolio maintenance, setting a standard approach for project and program and portfolio management.

OPM

The PMO is an organizational body assigned with various responsibilities related to the centralized and coordinated management of those projects under its domain.

In an effort to set a standard, the governance frameworks have over complicated it for most of us.

Use Info-Tech’s framework to create the PMO that works for your organization

Determine the Services Your PMO Will Provide
Manage your PMO services in alignment with your mandate and your organization’s needs.

Establish Your PMO’s Mandate
Figure out the purpose of your PMO and write it down so it’s clear to your leadership. Align your mandate to the organization’s needs.

Ensure Organizational Needs Are Being Met
Before you can decide on what your PMO will do, find out who’s doing what in your organization so you can fill gaps instead of duplicating efforts.

Hierarchy of PMO Needs
Hierarchy of PMO needs with 'Organizational Needs' as the base, 'PMO Mandate' in the middle, and 'PMO Services' at the top.

Info-Tech Insight

Consider the principles of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, which view the lower tiers of the hierarchy as fundamentally required to validate the pursuit of the higher tiers.

Step 1.1

Get a Common Understanding of Your PMO Options

Activities
  • 1.1.1 Review PMO Types
  • 1.1.2 SWOT Analysis

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Review Info-Tech’s PMO Types
  • Complete a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats Analysis

This step involves the following participants:

  • PMO director and/or portfolio manager
  • PMO staff/stakeholders
  • Project managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Current state analysis
Define the Right Kind of PMO
Step 1.1 Step 1.2

People mistake the PMO as only an office with project managers

It sounded simple enough, but no one could really explain what it meant.

PMOs are often born out of necessity or desperation. A traumatic event happens, and leadership decides that it wouldn’t have happened had there been a “Project Management Office.” The phrase itself is often quite reassuring and offers the hope of some sort of sanity and order.

People may not really be able to explain what a PMO is, but they do have a common understanding that it should solve all project management issues. But simply prescribing the “PMO” as a remedy for every organizational alignment is not going to be sufficient. There are different types of PMOs and more importantly there are different types of organizations.

Screenshot of a Google search for 'what is a project management office'.
Google and the Google logo are trademarks of Google LLC.

The PMI has described what a PMO could be

The PMI does not have a standard for PMOs like it does for things like project, program, and portfolio management. Its PMO definitions should be used as more of a reference point than a best practice.

But what should it do?

  • Supportive: Provides a consultative role to projects by supplying templates, best practices, training, access to information, and lessons learned from previous projects.
  • Controlling: Provides support and requires compliance through various means.
  • Directive: Takes control of the projects by directly executing them.

The PMI described three types of PMOs. These three types are well known in the industry, but they are essentially characteristics and do little to help people understand the functions and services of a PMO. There continue to be questions about the role a PMO should play in an organization and how it’s supposed to add value.

Stock photo of two sticky notes reading 'project' and 'management'.

Thousands of practitioners came together at the 2012 PMI Symposium and expanded upon PMBOK’s PMO types

  1. Managing
    Manages the work in projects and programs.
  2. Consulting
    Serves as an experience-based consultative body to project managers.
  3. Project Repository
    Repository of previous project documentation, lessons learned, etc.
  4. Enterprise PMO
    Provides PMO services to the organization.
  5. Center of Excellence
    Creates the standard and methodologies and provides tools.
  6. Managerial
    Manages the project and program managers, and eventually, other project resources.
  7. Delivery
    Manages the project and programs.

1.1.1 Leverage Info-Tech’s PMO types to anchor yourself

We have narrowed it down to five types of PMOs.

ePMO
Icon for ePMO.
IT PMO
Icon for IT PMO.
PMO
Icon for PMO.
CMO
Icon for CMO.
CoE
Icon for CoE.
Enterprise
Highest level PMO, typically responsible to align project and program work to strategy-significant projects or programs for the entire organization. Could include both IT and business units.
IT
IT PMOs provide project-related support for IT project portfolios. For many organizations PMOs originate in IT departments because of the structure required for technology-related projects.
Project/Program
Provides project-related tactical service as an entity to support a specific project or program. Can be dismantled when program is done.
Change
Change management offices (CMO) help build change management capabilities and enable change readiness in organizations.
Excellence
These centers differ in size and mode of organization, depending on their subject and scope. They support project work by providing the organizations with standard methodologies and tools.

What is your definition of a PMO?

Use this model to clearly show what is in and out of scope.

ePMO IT PMO PMO CMO CoE
PPM Reporting for enterprise portfolio and the financial/human resources needed to deliver them X
PPM Finance for project/portfolio capital and expense X X
PPM Customer Management – the customers, sponsors of the project X X
PPM Strategy Management – projects and programs relate to corporate X X X
PPM Program Management – related projects in the portfolio X X X
PPM Time Accounting X X x
PPM Business Relationship Management (BRM) X X
PPM Project Information System (PMIS) – organization of project information X X
PPM Administrative Support – general assistance with Portfolio X
PPM Record Keeping – Enterprise Information X X
RM Forecasting X
PM Quality Assurance X X
PM Procurement and Vendor Management X X X
PM Project Status Reporting X X
PM PM Services X X X
PM Training X
PM PM SOP X
OCM Adoption X X
OCM Change Management X X
OCM Benefits Attainment X X
OCM Forecast Benefits X X
OCM Track Benefits X X
GOV Intake X
GOV Governance X X
GOV Reporting X X X X

Use Info-Tech’s PMO function matrix to help provide role definitions for your PMO

Info-Tech’s potential PMO capabilities are in the header of the table below. These are the services a PMO may (or may not) provide depending on the needs of the organization.

Portfolio Management Resource Management Project Management Organizational Change Management PMO Governance
Recordkeeping and bookkeeping Strategy management Assessment of available supply of people and their time Project status reporting PM SOP
(e.g. feed the portfolio, project planning, task managing)
Benefits management Technology and infrastructure
Reporting Financial management HR Security
PMIS Intake Matching supply to demand based on time, cost, scope, and skill set requirements Procurement and vendor management Legal Financial
CRM/RM/BRM Program management
Tracking of utilization based on the allocations Quality Intake
Time Accounting PM services
(e.g. staffing project managers or coordinators)
Quality assurance Organizational change management Project progress, visibility, and process
Forecasting of utilization via supply-demand reconciliation Closure and lessons learned
Administrative support PM Training

The rest of this blueprint will help you choose the right capabilities and accompanying job functions for your PMO.

Various options for specific PMO job functions are listed below each capability. PMO leaders need to decide which of these functions are required for their organization.

1.1.2 SWOT analysis

45-60 minutes

Input: Current PMO governance documents and SOPs

Output: An assessment of current strengths, opportunities, threats, and weaknesses of capabilities in previous slide

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts, Sticky notes

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff/stakeholders, Project managers

Perform a SWOT analysis to assess the current state of PMO capabilities covered on the previous slide.

The purpose of the SWOT is to begin to define the goals of this implementation by assessing your project management, portfolio management, resource management, organizational change management, and governance capabilities and cultivating alignment around the most critical opportunities and challenges.

Follow these steps to complete the SWOT analysis:

  1. Have participants discuss and identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.
  2. Spend roughly 60 minutes on this. Use a whiteboard, flip chart, or PowerPoint slide to document results of the discussion as points are made.
  3. Make sure results are recorded and saved either using the template provided in the next slide or by taking a picture of the whiteboard or flip chart.

1.1.2 Sample SWOT analysis

Strengths

  • Knowledge, skills, and talent of project staff.
  • We have fairly effective project management processes.
  • Motivation to get things done when priorities, goals, and action plans are clear.

Weaknesses

  • IT-business communication and alignment.
  • No standards are currently in place across departments. Staff are unsure which templates to use and how/when/why to use them.
  • There are no formal intake structures in place. Projects are approved and it’s up to us to “figure it out.”
  • We have no prioritization practices to keep up with constantly changing priorities and shifts in the marketplace.

Opportunities

  • Establish portfolio discipline to improve IT-business communication through more effective and efficient project coordination.
  • Stronger initiation processes should translate to smoother project execution.
  • Establish more disciplined and efficient weekly/monthly project reporting practices that should facilitate more effective communication with senior leaders.

Threats

  • Risk of introducing burdensome processes and documentation that takes more time away from getting things done.
  • We tried to formalize a PMO in the past and it failed after eight months.
  • We have no insight into project resourcing.

Step 1.2

Determine Where You Are and Engage Your Leadership

Activities
  • 1.2.1 Assess Current State
  • 1.2.2 Gap Analysis
  • 1.2.3 Vision Exercise
  • 1.2.4 PMO Charter
  • 1.2.5 Strategic Planning

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Assess the current state of your PPM/PM services using the PMO Role Definition Tool
  • Determine current gaps in your services and processes using the PMO Role Definition Tool
  • Discuss the vison for your PMO
  • Start creating your PMO charter

This step involves the following participants:

  • PMO director and/or portfolio manager
  • PMO staff/stakeholders
  • Project managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Results of PMO Role Definition Tool
  • PMO vision
  • PMO charter

Define the Right Kind of PMO

Step 1.1 Step 1.2

Why do organizations need a PMO?

Stock image of a man thinking.

“If a company is not a project-oriented organization, there’s less of a need for a PMO. If they are project-focused though, they should have one. Otherwise, who’s driving the delivery of their projects? Who’s establishing their methodology? How are they managing resources efficiently?” (Mary Hubbard, PMP, director of the PMO at Siemens Government Technologies Inc., A PMI Global Executive Council Member)

Signs you might need a PMO:

  • A lack of project transparency.
  • Significant discrepancies in project results.
  • Poor customer satisfaction rates.
  • An inability to cost projects accurately.
  • A high percentage of delayed or cancelled projects.
  • High project failure rates.
  • Poor alignment of project activity and business strategy investments.
  • Inconsistent project management processes and methodologies.
  • A lack of collaboration and knowledge sharing.
  • Little to no resource training to meet IT and business needs.
  • A lack of resource management for utilization and capacity.
  • Little to no visibility into project, program, and portfolio-level status.

Why does your organization need a PMO?

Observe the needs of your organization before deciding on services to support it.
  • Observe what is and what is not in place. Look for existing processes, tools, and systems and evidence that they are being followed. You might already have some pieces in place; the question becomes what to keep and what not to keep.
  • What does your organization look like?
    • Name
    • Population
    • Current Project Lifecycle
    • IT Services Team
    • # of Unique Applications
    • Annual Budget
  • Gather a list of potential areas for improvement where a PMO can add value. Once a list is established, convert it to a prioritized queue of initiatives. A key item on your list should be how projects go from beginning to end so you can understand the potential issues and opportunities with your current project delivery.
Stock image of a hierarchy mapped out over a birds eye view of people.

Ideally, we wouldn’t invest in project, portfolio, or OCM because they’re overhead processes without any direct value…

…but you need to spend just enough to demonstrate you are a diligent steward of the assets under your administration.

Organizational Change Management

  • Well-run projects can fail without OCM.
  • More than anyone else, it’s up to the sponsor to pursue outcomes.

Project Management

  • Determine the current project management standards and methodologies.
  • Uncover any forms and templates that are currently in use.
  • If there is a lack of project management knowledge among current or future staff, you will need to do some training.

Portfolio Management

  • Who currently approves projects and who will be approving them in the future?
  • Who is accountable for approving too many projects?
  • What roles does resource capacity play? Is it constrained or do you approve everything?
  • Are the resources in your PMO full-time?
  • How big is your portfolio?
  • How much do you spend on resources (hours or months)?

Governance

  • Governance can mean many different things: intake, finance, over-sight of existing projects, resource management, technology and architecture, and process.
  • Don’t try to introduce governance without considering the people who may already be governing different areas.
  • Consider what things can be done without getting executive approval.

Define your PMO’s role in the organization

Use Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool to help establish your PMO’s future state.

  • Use Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool to figure out the functions your PMO should provide.
  • The current-state analysis uses specific questions to assess how you are doing things now and provide you with some situational awareness.
  • The gap analysis uses another set of specific questions to uncover the holes in your organization and the services that are not being provided.
  • Based on the answers you gave to the questions, the tool will populate the functions that your PMO should provide to your organization: the services your organization needs.
  • Use the outputs to start looking into missing functions and ultimately start building or re-establishing the responsibilities of your PMO.
  • Consider having multiple team members answer all the questions to establish alignment and get realistic data.

Sample of the PMO Role Definition Tool.

Download the PMO Role Definition Tool

Hey, you don’t to have to spend anything on portfolio, project, and organizational change management! Assuming of course…

  • You have enough people to do all your projects
  • All projects are getting done on time
  • Your customers and employees are happy
  • You have complete visibility into the portfolio
  • Your projects align with your corporate strategy
  • Your projects align with your operational needs
  • Your strategic and operational needs are in harmony
  • You have the right skills
  • You are using all resources provided to you
  • People self-identify the right work and independently do that work
  • Time is not wasted
  • The work is production-ready (i.e. high quality)
  • Vendors honor their commitments
  • The sponsor is confident they’re getting what was committed
  • You have sufficient reports for the portfolio
  • Stakeholders make it through transitions with minimal resistance
  • The organization is prepared to adopt the outcomes of projects
  • The sponsors’ forecasted benefits are realized
  • Stakeholders are aware of the need for change
  • Stakeholders transition well from current to future state

Use the tool on the next slide to see where you may need to spend.

1.2.1 Assess the current state of your project environment

20-30 minutes

Input: Understanding of current project portfolio environment

Output: Completed current state survey

Materials: Tab 1 of Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff/stakeholders, Project managers

Screenshot from tab 1 of Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool.

Screenshot from tab 1 of Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool. There are three columns: '#', 'Question', and 'Answer'.

There are 20 current-state questions in column C. Together, the questions address the five capabilities in Info-Tech’s PMO function matrix (slide 28).

Use the drop-down menu in column D to answer Agree, Somewhat Agree, Neutral, Somewhat Disagree, or Disagree to each question in column C.

The questions are broad by design. Answer them honestly and select “neutral” if anything is not applicable.

1.2.2 Set your target state needs to identify gaps

15-30 minutes

Input: Reflection on the question, “If I/We do nothing, someone in the organization is…”

Output: Completed target state survey

Materials: Tab 2 of Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff/stakeholders, Project managers

Screenshot from tab 2 of Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool.

Screenshot from tab 2 of Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool. There are four columns: '#', 'Question', 'Answer', and 'Department'.

Each question in column C of tab 2 should be answered in the context of, “If I do nothing, someone in the organization is…”

Answer each question by using the drop-down menu in column D to select “Yes,” “No,” “I don’t know,” or “N/A.”

If “Yes” include the department or area that is responsible.

Hierarchy of PMO needs with 'Organizational Needs' highlighted. 'Organizational Needs' at the base, 'PMO Mandate' in the middle, and 'PMO Services' at the top.

Review the preliminary list of your potential PMO functions

Tab 3 of the PMO Role Definition Tool contains a customized version of Info-Tech’s PMO definition matrix, based upon your inputs in the previous two tabs.

Screenshot from tab 3 of Info-Tech’s PMO Role Definition Tool. It is titled 'PMO Functions and Groups' and contains a table with five columns: 'Portfolio Management', 'Resource Management', 'Project Management', 'Organizational Change Management', and 'Governance'. Each column contains high level recommendations, and at the bottom of the columns are outputs.

The name of the box is the group the function belongs to.

These outputs are based on the answers to the questions on the previous 2 tabs.

In each group’s box are high-level recommendations.

Consider your stakeholders

Who benefits from the new or updated PMO structure?

In a matrix environment, understanding the challenges other teams are facing is a core requirement of an effective PMO. The best way to understand this is through direct engagement like conducting interviews and taking surveys with management and members of other teams.

Ask yourself these questions about your PMO:

  • Are we doing the right things?
  • Do we know the current status of projects?
  • Are we managing, escalating, and resolving project issues?
  • Do PMs have the right training?
  • What is our overall utilization?

A PMO should be structured to provide service to the organization. View it as a business, serving the stakeholders.

1.2.3 Complete this vision exercise to produce an initial mandate for a new/improved PMO

45-60 minutes

Input: Outputs from SWOT analysis

Output: An initial PMO mandate

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts, Sticky notes

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff/stakeholders, Project managers

Now that you have an idea of the services your organization needs from steps 1.1 and 1.2 of this blueprint, you can discuss the target state of your PMO.

Follow these steps to complete the SWOT analysis:

  1. Each person writes one aspect of a future state that would solve the issues described in the SWOT analysis (activity 1.1.1). Use sticky notes and post them on the whiteboard.
  2. As a group, identify which of these aspects would be good candidates for embodying the “core element” of your PMO’s new mandate.
  3. From the aspects gathered, have everyone individually come up with a statement of one to two sentences they think captures the overall theme and vision of this PMO.
  4. Collectively choose the best statement to use as the working mandate for your new project management office. This mandate can be modified as needed in the time leading up the creation and launch of your PMO.

Hierarchy of PMO needs with 'PMO Mandate' highlighted. 'Organizational Needs' at the base, 'PMO Mandate' in the middle, and 'PMO Services' at the top.

1.2.4 Use Info-Tech’s PMO Project Charter template to help capture your mandate and obtain approval

3-4 hours

Input: Activity 1.2.3, Logical considerations for PMO deployment (see bulleted list on this slide)

Output: An assessment of current strengths, opportunities, threats, and weaknesses of capabilities in previous slide

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts, Sticky notes

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff/stakeholders, Project managers

A successful PMO will offer a range of services which business units can rely on. The aim of the PMO charter is to outline what is in scope for the PMO and what services it will initially offer.

A project charter serves several important functions. It organizes the project so you can make efficient and effective resource allocation decisions. It also communicates important details about the project purpose, scope definition, and project parameters.

To use this template, simply modify or delete all information in grey text and convert the remaining text to black before printing or sending. Sections within the Template include:

  1. PMO Mandate
  2. Goals & Benefits
  3. Scope Definition
  4. Key PMO Stakeholders
  5. Projected Timeline for Implementation
  6. Project Roles and Responsibilities
  7. High-Level Budget
  8. High-Level Risk Assessment

Sample of the PMO Project Charter Template.

Download the PMO Project Charter Template

Engage leadership to refine target-state expectations

Stock image of a person with a megaphone. ?
Will project managers be included in the PMO? Which projects and programs will be in the PMO’s mandate?
?
Will the PMO have decision-making authority? If so, how much and on what issues?
?
Where in the organizational structure will the PMO report?

“Changing the perception of project management from ‘busy work’ to ‘valued efforts’ is easier when the PMO is properly aligned.” (Project Management Institute, October 2009)

Don’t assume your PMO is merely tactical

It can help drive strategy instead of just being a technical arm.

Strategic

Stock image of a business person.

Tactical

Strategic Alignment
Leadership assumes that your presence will optimize the alignment of projects to corporate strategy.
Process Adherence
Leadership assumes you’re all about process.
Portfolio Thinking
Leadership assumes that you’re thinking about the overall throughput of projects through the portfolio.
Project Thinking
Leadership assumes you’re not thinking beyond the boundaries of a single project at any given time.
Outcomes Focused
Leadership assumes that you’re focused on the outcomes forecast by sponsors.
Timeline Focused
Leadership assumes you’re focused on delivering projects on time.

Info-Tech Insight

A key success factor for a PMO is to take part of strategic conversations; when they are left out, it creates a barrier. The PMO is the connective tissue between strategy and tactics. Don’t risk your benefits by not having the PMO Director at the table before you make decisions.

Avoid the disconnect

Create a strategic plan with project professionals at the table.

  • Strategic plans should guide organizations to future states, yet many don’t ever get used. This is because there is a disconnect between the people creating the strategic plan and the people being asked to implement it. Strategic planners don’t often develop their plans with the help of project managers who can ensure the plan is transferred into a working operational plan.
  • Strategic planners are broad thinkers with high-level plans whereas project professionals often work in the trenches. The disconnect between the two can often result in cost overruns, delays in implementation, low worker morale, and an overall chaotic work environment.
  • By putting strategic planners and project managers together to work on the strategic planning process, they can see what the other sees and plan accordingly.
  • Twenty-seven percent more projects are executed successfully when a company’s structure and resources align with their strategy (KPMG, 2017).

“The failure to build a bridge between the strategic planning process and project management’s planning process is a major reason strategic plans don’t work.” (Bruce McGraw, Project/Programme Manager)

1.2.5 Strategic planning

1 hour

To create a strategic plan that provides value, recognize that the strategic plan for the PMO is not the PMO charter.

  • The PMO charter is the organizational mandate for the PMO. It defines the role, purpose and functions of the PMO. It articulates who the PMO's sponsors and customers are, the services that it offers, and the staffing and support structures required to deliver those services. And, it assumes that a decision to have a PMO has already been made.
  • A strategic plan enables the PMO to play an essential role in achieving a company’s business goals, setting out clear objectives and then providing a roadmap on how to achieve them. A strategic plan maps the tools and resources necessary to achieve successful project outcomes.

To create a results-driven strategic plan for your PMO, it is helpful to follow a top-down format:

  • Start by going through the list on the right and update the strategic plan.
  • What are the top project-related issues and opportunities you want your PMO to address and what’s the value to the business of trusting them?

Vision: this needs to be a vivid and common image
Mission: this is the special assignment that is given to a group
Goals: these are broad statements of future conditions
Objectives: these are operational statements that indicate how much and by when (e.g. deliverables or intangible objectives like productivity)
Strategies: these are the set of actions that need to take place
Needs: these are the things required to carry out the strategy
Critical Success Factors: these are the key areas of activity in which favorable results are necessary to reach the goal

Download the PMO Strategic Plan

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Phase 2

Staff Your PMO for Resilience

Phase 1

  • 1.1 Get a Common Understanding of Your PMO Options
  • 1.2 Determine Where You Are and Engage Your Leadership

Phase 2

  • 2.1 Identify Organizational Design
  • 2.2. Build Job Descriptions

Phase 3

  • 3.1 Create Roadmap
  • 3.2 Governance and OCM

Info-Tech’s approach

Follow our two-step approach to successfully staff your PMO.

  1. Determine your PMO staffing needs.
    Our approach to building a PMO starts by analyzing the staffing requirements of your PMO mandate.
  2. Create purpose-built role descriptions.
    Once you have an understanding of the staff and skills you’ll need to succeed, we have job description aids you’ll need to fill the roles.

The Info-Tech difference:

  1. Save time developing a purpose-built approach. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to PMO staffing. The advice and tools in this research will help you quickly determine your unique staffing needs and guide your next steps to get the staffing you need.
  2. Leverage insider research. We’ve worked with thousands of PMOs and have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of PMO staffing. The approach in this research is informed by client successes and will help you avoid the common mistakes that drive PMO failure.

IT staff allocation for project work

Projects and Project Portfolio Management

58.3% — 58% of respondents feel they have the appropriate staffing level to execute project management effectively. (Source: Info-Tech IT Staffing Benchmark Report)

59.8% — 59% feel they have the appropriate staffing level to execute requirements gathering effectively. (Source: Info-Tech IT Staffing Benchmark Report)

The GDP contributions from project-oriented industries are forecasted to reach $20.2 trillion over the next 20 years. (Source: “Project Management: Job Growth and Talent Gap” Project Management Institute, 2017)

Info-Tech Insight

Project work is only going to increase, and in general, people are dissatisfied with their current staffing levels.

Step 2.1

Identify Organizational Design

Activities
  • 2.1.1 Right, Wrong, Missing, Confusing
  • 2.1.2 Map Your Current Structure
  • 2.1.3 Inventory Assessment
  • 2.1.4 Job Description Survey

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Complete a Right, Wrong, Missing, Confusing analysis
  • Determine your current organizational/PMO structure
  • Assess your current inventory
  • Complete the job description survey

This step involves the following participants:

  • PMO director and/or portfolio manager
  • PMO staff/stakeholders
  • Project managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Current-state analysis
  • Job description survey results

Staff Your PMO for Resilience

Step 2.1 Step 2.2

2.1.1 Right, wrong, missing, confusing

30-45 minutes

Input: Current PMO process, Current PMO org. chart

Output: An assessment of current things that are being done right and wrong and what is currently missing and confusing

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts, Sticky notes

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

Perform a right, wrong, missing, confusing analysis to assess the current state of your PMO and its staff.

The purpose of this exercise is to begin to define the goals of this implementation by assessing your staffing capabilities and cultivating alignment around the most critical opportunities and challenges.

Follow these steps to complete the analysis:

  1. Have participants discuss what is wrong, right, missing, and confusing.
  2. Spend roughly 45 minutes on this. Use a whiteboard, flip chart, or PowerPoint slide to document results of the discussion as points are made.
  3. Make sure results are recorded and saved by taking a picture of the whiteboard or flip chart.

Organizational types

  1. Functional
    Functional organizations are structured around the functions the organization needs to be performed.
  2. Projectized
    Projectized organizations are organized around projects for maximal project management effectiveness.
  3. Matrix
    Matrix organizations have structures that blend the characteristics of functional and projectized organizations.

Functional organization

The traditional hierarchical organizational structure.

A functional hierarchical structure with 'Functional Managers' highlighted and the note 'Project coordination'. 'Chief Executive' at the top, 'Functional Managers' in the middle, and 'Staff' at the bottom.
Adapted from ProjectEngineer, 2019
  1. Employees are organized by specialties like human resources, information technology, sales, marketing, administration, etc.
  2. The project management role will be performed by a team member of a functional area under the management of a functional manager.
  3. Resources for the project will need to be negotiated for with the functional managers, and the accessibility of those resources will be based on business conditions. Any escalations of issues would need to be taken to the functional manager.
  4. The project management role would act more like a project coordinator who does not usually carry the title of project manager.
  5. Project management is considered a part-time responsibility. Of all the organizational types, this one tends to be the most difficult for the project manager. The project manager lacks the authority to assign resources and must acquire people and other resources from multiple functional managers.
  6. Because the project manager has little to no authority, the project can take longer to complete than in other organizational structures, and there is generally no recognized project management methodology or best practices.

Projectized organization

The majority of project resources are involved in project work.

A projectized hierarchical structure with a single project hierarchy highlighted and the note 'Project coordination'. 'Chief Executive' at the top, 'Project Managers' in the middle, and 'Staff' at the bottom.
Adapted from ProjectEngineer, 2019
  1. The project manager has increased independence and authority and is a full-time member of a project organization. They have project resources available to them, such as project coordinators, project schedulers, business analysts, and plan administrators.
  2. The project manager is responsible to the sponsor and/or senior management. The project manager has authority and control of the budget, and any escalation of issues would be taken to the sponsor.
  3. Given that the project resources report to the project manager versus the functional area, there may be a decrease in the subject matter expertise of the team members.
  4. Team members are usually co-located within the same office or virtually co-located to maximize communication effectiveness.
  5. There can be some functional units within the organization; however, those units play a supportive role, without authority over the project manager.
  6. There is no defined hierarchy. Resources are brought together specifically for the purpose of a project. At the end of each project, resources are either reassigned to another project or returned to a resource pool.

Matrix organization

A combination of functional and projectized.

A matrix hierarchical structure with the lowest row highlighted and the note 'Project coordination'. 'Chief Executive' at the top, 'Functional Managers' in the middle, mainly 'Staff' at the bottom, except one 'Project Manager' who coordinates across functions.
Adapted from ProjectEngineer, 2019
  1. A matrix organization is a blended organizational structure. Although a functional hierarchy is still in place, the project manager is recognized as a valuable position and is given more authority to manage the project and assign resources.
  2. Matrix organizations can be classified as weak, balanced, or strong based on the relative authority of the functional manager and project manager. If the project manager is given more of a project coordinator role, then the organization is considered a weak matrix. If the project manager is given much more authority on resources and budget spending, the organization is considered a strong matrix.
  3. Matrix structures evolve in response to the rise of large-scale projects in contemporary organizations. These projects require efficient processing of large amounts of information.
  4. Working in a matrix organization is challenging and structurally complex. Employees have dual reporting relationships – generally to both a functional manager and a project and/or product manager. However, if done well, it offers the best of both worlds.
  5. The matrix organization structure usually exists in large and multi-project organizations. Here they can move employees whenever and wherever their services are needed. The matrix structure has the flexibility to transfer the organization’s talent by considering employees to be shared resources.

The project management office

The vast majority of PMOs are understaffed and underequipped.

  • They are often born out of necessity or desperation.
  • They have no long-terms goals; they tend to go from year to year trying to meet the organization’s needs.
  • They don’t have clear mandates, so it is difficult to determine how they are providing value.
  • Over time (and sometimes even from day one), project management offices find that other tasks fall into their area of responsibility. This often happens when the work has nowhere else to go.
  • Resource management is the challenge, both in terms of being able to allocate skilled resources to projects and within the PMO itself. Staffing gaps within the PMO are often met by individuals wearing more than one hat.

A stock photo of a circle of chairs in a field being occupied by only two people.

2.1.2 Map your current structure

30 minutes to 1 hour

Input: Current org. charts and PMO structures, Info-Tech’s PMO Function Matrix

Output: Structure chart

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

  1. As a group, review your current organizational and PMO structure.
  2. Map out both, or if your PMO is small, map out how it fits into the overall structure.
    • Make sure to think about your process, reporting structures, and escalation hierarchies.
    • Consider the capabilities on slide 59 as you work.
    • Use the sample structure on the next page as a guide.

Stock image of a business hierarchy.

Sample PMO structure

Sample PMO structure with 'PMO Director' at the top. 'Portfolio Administrator' below, but not directly in charge of others. Then 'Program Manager', 'Change Manager', 'Resource Management Analyst', 'Business Relationship Manager', and 'Business Analyst' all report to the PMO Director. Below 'Program Manager' are two 'Project Managers' then 'Project Coordinator'. Stock photo of a hand placing a puzzle piece of a business person on it into a puzzle.

Info-Tech’s PMO Function Matrix

Info-Tech’s potential PMO capabilities are in the header of the table below.

Portfolio Management Resource Management Project Management Organizational Change Management PMO Governance
Recordkeeping and bookkeeping Strategy management Assessment of available supply of people and their time Project status reporting PM SOP
(e.g. feed the portfolio, project planning, task managing)
Benefits management Technology and infrastructure
Reporting Financial management HR Security
PMIS Intake Matching supply to demand based on time, cost, scope, and skill set requirements Procurement and vendor management Legal Financial
CRM/RM/BRM Program management
Tracking of utilization based on the allocations Quality Intake
Time Accounting PM services
(e.g. staffing project managers or coordinators)
Quality assurance Organizational change management Project progress, visibility, and process
Forecasting of utilization via supply-demand reconciliation Closure and lessons learned
Administrative support PM Training

2.1.3 Inventory assessment

30-45 minutes

Input: Understanding of your current situation regarding project intake and process

Output: Survey results

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

When staffing your PMO, it is important to understand your current situation regarding project intake and process.

Answer the following questions, and be as detailed as possible:

  • What is your project intake process?
  • How many projects do you currently have?
  • How many people lead projects?
  • Are those who lead projects distributed (federated) or centralized?
  • What tools do you use to manage your portfolio, projects, and resources?

Stock image of a magnifying glass over an idea lightbulb surrounded by the six classic question words.

2.1.4 Job description survey

45 minutes to 1 hour

Input: Tab 1 of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

Output: List of current projects, processes, and tools

Materials: PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

On tab 1 of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook, use the survey to help determine potential role requirements across various project portfolio management, project management, business analysis, and organizational change management activities.

Follow these steps to complete the survey:

  1. Consider the role that you are trying to fill.
  2. Read each question carefully and use the drop-down menu to answer whether the activity in column C is a core, ancillary, or out-of-scope job duty.

Download the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

2.1.4 Job description survey continued

Sample of the Job Description Survey with questions and responses.

Step 2.2

Build Job Descriptions

Activities
  • 2.2.1 Analyze Survey Results
  • 2.2.2 FTE Analysis
  • 2.2.3 Create Your Job Descriptions

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Complete the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook
  • Create job descriptions

This step involves the following participants:

  • PMO director and/or portfolio manager
  • PMO staff/stakeholders
  • Project managers

Outcomes of this step

  • PMO org. chart
  • Completed job descriptions

Staff Your PMO for Resilience

Step 2.1 Step 2.2

2.2.1 Analyze survey results

30 minutes

Tab 2 of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook shows the survey results from tab 1.

The job activities are ranked in a prioritized list. The analysis will help you determine if you require a portfolio manager, program manager, project manager, business analyst, organizational change manager, or a combination.

Follow these steps to analyze your results:

  • Digest the prioritized ranking. The job activities are ranked in a prioritized list (from most essential to the role to least essential) in column D. The core process or capability that corresponds to each activity is listed in column C.
  • Use the drop-down menu in column F to decide if the core job duties and ancillary job duties will or will not be included in the role description. Out-of-scope activities will automatically be removed.

Screenshot of the 'Job Description Survey Results' from the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook.

Download the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

2.2.2 FTE analysis

30 minutes

Input: Tab 3 of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

Output: Total estimated monthly time commitments, Preliminary FTE analysis

Materials: PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

Tab 3 of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook is used to complete the FTE analysis.

Download the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

2.2.2 FTE analysis continued

Screenshot of the 'FTE analysis' on tab 3 of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook. It has a table with columns for 'Rank', 'Process', 'Activity', and 'Est. Monthly Time Commitments (aka Column E)' with note 'Base these initial estimates on the number of projects and project teams, as well as the number of internal and external customers and stakeholders'. There is also a table of totals with a pie chart of the 'Distribution of Role Responsibilities'. The value for 'Total Estimated Monthly Timing Commitment' is in cell J5, and the note for the value of 'Preliminary FTE Analysis' is 'If your preliminary FTE analysis comes out to be more than 1 FTE, you may want to revisit your analysis on tabs 1 and 2 to further limit this role, or to further delineate it across multiple roles and FTEs'.

On tab 3, use column E to estimate the monthly time commitments required for each activity in the role.

Tip: Base estimates on the number of projects and project teams as well as the number of internal and external stakeholders across the portfolio(s) of projects and programs.

Cell J5 will provide a preliminary recommended FTE count for the role.

Job description content

Screenshot of the 'Job Description Content' section of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook.

This is an output tab based on your analysis in tabs 1 and 2. Copy and paste the content and add it under the relevant heading in Info-Tech's Blank Job Description Template later in this blueprint.

Screenshot of the 'Blank Job Description Template' section of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook.

For each capability you are including in your job description, there is a list of common certifications. These can also be copied and pasted into the Blank Job Description Template.

Download the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

How to determine the roles in your PMO

It’s not black and white.

While your PMO should have someone to lead the team, aside from that it’s hard to be specific about the exact roles your PMO needs without understanding the needs of your organization.

This is why it’s important to define your PMO first. Your team members should best support the function and capabilities of your PMO.

For example:

  • If you want to provide a training program to project managers, you’ll need your PMO to have people with experience delivering training and with experience having done the job before.
  • If your PMO provides management information and deep portfolio analysis, you’ll need someone on the team who knows their way around data analysis tools.

You should have a mix of skills in the PMO team, each complementing the others. You may have administrators and coordinators, data analysts and software experts, trainers, coaches, and senior managers.

“If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” (African proverb)

Managing projects and building PMOs are not the same thing

Your best project manager should be running projects, and, no, they can’t do both.

  • Your new PMO needs a leader to get it off the ground, but don’t assume that the best project manager is best suited to build the PMO. The goal-oriented passion of a successful project manager may prove to be antithetical to the forward-looking finesse and political acumen needed to develop and staff the PMO as an organizational unit. Avoid the common mistake of promoting effective people into positions where they become ineffective, a concept often referred to as “The Peter Principle.”
  • You can’t determine if your best project manager fits the PMO leadership role if the PMO’s role isn’t clearly defined. Carefully define and clearly articulate the PMO’s role to understand the skill set needed to develop and lead your PMO.
  • Project managers often propose to create a PMO without considering the fit with project portfolio management and organizational change management. If the leadership doesn’t understand the magnitude of what is being requested, they may well think a project manager is best suited to run the PMO. The prestige and/or compensation is attractive, but project managers will often spin their wheels and naturally focus on what they know how to do: manage projects. Start with a PMO design to align with business expectations.

The Peter Principle

The Peter Principle was first introduced by Canadian sociologist Laurence Johnston Peter describing the pitfalls of bureaucratic organizations. The original principle states that "in a hierarchically structured administration, people tend to be promoted up to their level of incompetence.” The principle is based on the observation that whenever someone succeeds at their job, the organizational response is to promote them, thus people will continue to be promoted until they reach a point where they’re no longer excelling at their job. At that point, they would no longer be promoted. Followed to its logical conclusion, organizations will continue to take successful people and rotate them to new positions until they are no longer effective.

PMO Director/Lead

Job overviews for different kinds of PMO directors.

The job descriptions on the next few pages are associated with the descriptive headings, but it is important to recognize that these diverse roles can all fall under the job title of PMO director.

Portfolio Management

As PMO director, you will oversee the throughput of IT projects using portfolio management, project management, and organizational change management disciplines.

You and your team will directly manage the intake of new project requests, the preparation of evaluation-ready project proposals, and the handoff of approved project initiation documents to project managers in other departments. You will forecast and track the availability of people to do the project work throughout the project life cycle. You will publish monthly and annual portfolio reporting based on information collected from the project teams, and you will oversee the closure of projects with follow-up reporting to those who approved them.

From time to time, the PMO may be required to identify projects that should be frozen or canceled based on criteria set forth by the leadership and/or industry best practices.

While currently out of scope, successful candidates should be comfortable with the possibility that the PMO may required to develop full life cycle organizational change management in the future. As well, experienced project managers in the PMO may be required to manage high-risk, high-visibility projects from time to time.

PMO Director/Lead

Job overviews for different kinds of PMO directors.

Project Management

As PMO director, you will oversee a team of professional project managers who are responsible for the company’s high-risk, high-visibility, and strategic projects.

You and your team will receive initiation documents and assigned resourcing for approved projects from the company’s authorized decision makers. You will manage the fulfillment of the project requirements, providing regular status updates to project and portfolio stakeholders and escalating concerns when projects are struggling to meet their commitments for scope, cost, and timelines.

Over time, the PMO will take on an increasing role in organizational change management. The PMO will transition its focus from project delivery to business outcomes. Over time, the PMO will transition project sponsors from articulating requirements to delivering results.

Project Policy

As PMO director, you will oversee the establishment, support, and promotion of company-wide standards for project management.

You and your team will modernize and maintain the company policy manuals and processes for everything related to project management. You will adapt our legacy PMBOK-based standards to cover iterative project management approaches as well as the more formal approaches required for construction projects, outsourced projects, and a wide variety of non-IT projects.

PMO Director/Lead

Job overviews for different kinds of PMO directors.

Project Governance

As PMO director, you will oversee the governance of project spending, delivery, and impact.

You and your team will ensure that project proposals address the broad needs of the organization via strategic alignment, operational alignment, appropriateness of timing, identification and management of risk, and ability to execute. You will represent the needs and interests of the shareholder, ratepayer, or constituent by validating adherence to the organization’s published policies for project, portfolio, and organizational change management.

The PMO is independent from the broader information technology division and will retain a mandate to ensure transparency and disclosure relative to the consumption of the organization’s scarce resources in the pursuit of high-risk IT projects.

Stock photo of a compass pointing in the direction of leadership.

Info-Tech sample job descriptions

Use the sample job descriptions available with this blueprint as a guide when creating your descriptions.

  1. PMO Director
  2. Portfolio Manager
  3. Portfolio Administrator
  4. Project Manager
  5. Project Coordinator
  6. Resource Management Analyst
  1. Program Manager
  2. Change Manager
  3. Business Analyst
  4. Business Relationship Manager
  5. Product Owner
  6. Scrum Master

Stock photo of a pen resting on a 'job duties' section of a job description.

2.2.3 Create your job descriptions

30 minutes

Input: PMO Job Description Builder Workbook

Output: Job descriptions

Materials: Blank Job Description Template

Participants: PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

When you’ve determined the roles you need, you can start creating your job descriptions. If none of our out-of-the-box, pre-populated job description templates suit your needs, use the results of Info-Tech’s PMO Job Description Builder Workbook and the Blank Job Description Template to create your purpose-built job description.

Follow these steps to create your job description:

  1. Copy the content from tab 4 of the PMO Job Description Builder Workbook and paste it under the relevant headings in the “Responsibilities” section of the Blank Job Description Template. Delete any unused headings if they are not relevant to your role. Additionally, use the list of common certifications on tab 4 of the Workbook to inform that section of the Blank Job Description Template.
  2. Use the sample job descriptions on the blueprint landing page as a guide for filling out the remaining sections of the document.

Download the Blank Job Description Template

2.2.3 Create your job descriptions continued

Screenshot of the Blank Job Description Template.

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Phase 3

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Phase 1

  • 1.1 Get a Common Understanding of Your PMO Options
  • 1.2 Determine Where You Are and Engage Your Leadership

Phase 2

  • 2.1 Identify Organizational Design
  • 2.2. Build Job Descriptions

Phase 3

  • 3.1 Create Roadmap
  • 3.2 Governance and OCM

Having a strategy is essential but real value and benefits are delivered through projects

9.9% of every dollar is wasted due to poor project performance

52% of projects are delivered to stakeholder satisfaction

51% of projects are likely to meet original the goal and business intent
(Source: Project Management Institute, 2018)

You’re always going to have troubled projects

Have the organizational discipline to step away from the mess and develop a plan.

  • The world of modern project management has been in place for over 50 years and yet business leaders still seem to put the pressure on troubled projects instead of broken processes.
  • With higher portfolio maturity comes higher performance, warranting investment in the PMO.
  • Instead of alternative cost-reduction measures, such as stopping an individual project, we find that PMO resources (or the entire PMO) are being cut. In most cases, this demonstrates a lack of understanding of the value of portfolio management processes and related impacts.
  • Plan for a series of improvements over time so you’re not continually using your PMO resources on troubled projects. Instead, maintain an ongoing focus on improvement.

Stock photo of an axe stuck in a piece of wood.
“If I had six hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend the first four hours sharpening the axe.” (Anonymous woodsman)

All improvements cannot be done at once

  • The difference in a winning PMO is determined by a roadmap or plan created at the beginning.
  • Leaders should understand the full scope of the plan before committing their teams to the project.
  • All improvements cannot be done at once. The best PMOs create an approach of overall governance and strictly adhere to it. After the approach is defined, a roadmap can be plotted, executed, and delivered effectively.
  • The exercise of creating a roadmap is less about the plan and more about raising the level of understanding for stakeholders.
  • We often find that the PMO is ahead of the business's views of how the PMO can support and add value to the business. A lot of effort is spent trying to convince businesses of the value of a PMO, usually without complete success.
  • The PMO needs to align to the strategic goals of the business, providing the business understands or accepts that alignment. By aligning your roadmap activities to business drivers, you are more likely to get ownership from the business for the initiatives.
Stock image of a winding path between two map markers.

A PMO can benefit your business and organization as a whole

Your PMO can:

  1. Help to align the project or portfolio with a focus on the future strategy of the organization.
  2. Be a mechanism to deliver projects successfully, keep them on track, and report when scheduling, budget, and other scope issues could derail the project.
  3. Create a portfolio of projects and understand the links and dependencies between the projects. This provides you with a bird's-eye view to make better decisions based on changes as they arise.
  4. Facilitate better communications with customers and stakeholders.
  5. Enforce project management governance and ensure consistent standards throughout the organization.
  6. Strategize on how to best use shared resources and best use them productively.

“If you run projects and the projects have a significant level of cost or have significant level of impact, then you can really benefit from a PMO. Certainly, the larger the projects, the bigger the budget, the more there are projects, then the more you can benefit from a PMO.” (Michael Fritsch, Vice President PMO, Confoe)

“PMOs are there to ensure project and program success and that’s critical because organizations deliver value through projects and programs.” (Brian Weiss, Vice President, Practitioner Career Development, Project Management Institute)

Step 3.1

Create Roadmap

Activities
  • 3.1.1 Business Goals
  • 3.1.2 Roadmap
  • 3.1.3 Resources

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Determine business goals
  • Create roadmap
  • Establish resources

This step involves the following participants:

  • PMO director and/or portfolio manager
  • PMO staff/stakeholders
  • Project managers

Outcomes of this step

  • PMO roadmap aligned to business goals

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Step 3.1 Step 3.2

3.1.1 Business goals and priorities

30 minutes

Input: Business strategies and goals, Current PMO org. chart

Output: An initial short, medium, long-term roadmap of initiatives

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts, Sticky notes, Slide 83

Participants: IT leaders/CIO, PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

When you are determining what your PMO will provide in the future, it is important to align the ambition of the PMO with the maturity of the business. Too often, a lot of effort is spent trying to convince businesses of the value of a PMO.

Before you develop your roadmap, try to seek out the key strategies that the business is currently driving to get the proper ownership for the proposed initiatives.

  • What does leadership want to accomplish?
  • What are the key strategies the business is currently driving?
  • What are the current pain points?

Once you’ve established the business strategies, start mapping out your initiatives:

  • For each initiative, consider the activities you think will work best to take you from your current to future state. It’s okay to keep this high level, we will break them down later in the blueprint.
  • Don’t place activities on a roadmap with dates yet. Use the table on the next slide to record the activities against each initiative at a high level.
Current State Business Strategies PMO Initiatives Future State Business Strategies
Short Term Medium Term Long Term
Portfolio Management Project Intake Process
Triage Process
Project Levelling
Book of Record
Approval
Prioritization
Reporting
Resource Allocation
Resource Management
Project Management Standardize Project Management
Methodologies
PM Training
Organizational Change Management Benefits
Governance Project progress, visibility, and process
Documentation

3.1.2 Create your roadmap

1-2 hours

Services should be introduced gradually and your PMO roadmap should clearly highlight this and explain when key deliverables will be achieved.

Consider the below top-level tasks and add any others that pertain to your organization:

  • Enable Transition
  • Establish Governance
  • Organizational Chart
  • Technology and Infrastructure
  • Develop Portfolio Management Capabilities and Guidelines
  • Standardize Project Management Methodology
  • Organizational Change Management
  • Strategy Management

Download Info-Tech’s PMO MS Project Plan Sample to see a full list of top-level tasks and second-level tasks. Once done, you can visually plot the tasks on a roadmap. See the next few slides for roadmap visuals.

Stock photo of median lines on a road with the years 2021-2023 painted between them.

Download the PMO MS Project Plan Sample

Screenshot of PMO MS Project Plan Sample

Screenshot of PMO MS Project Plan Sample with notes point out the headings as 'Top-level hierarchy' and the list contents as 'Second-level-hierarchy'.

Sample roadmap

A sample roadmap with column headers 'Task' and 'Q1', 'Q2', 'Q3', 'Q4', and 'Q1' with 3 months beneath each quarter. Under 'Task' are 'Establish Tradition', 'Establish Governance', 'Organizational Chart', and 'Technology and Infrastructure'; these are the 'Top-level-hierarchy'. There are arrows laid out in the table cross section with different steps; these are the 'Second-level hierarchy'.

Sample roadmap

A sample roadmap with monthly column headers 'Jan' through 'Jun'. Rows are 'Develop Portfolio Management Capabilities and Guidelines', 'Standardize Project Management Methodology', and 'Design Resource Management Process'. There are processes laid out in the table cross section that are color-coded as 'Completed', 'In progress', and 'Planned'.

Consider the resources you will need

Use these Info-Tech resources to make sure your roadmap will be successful.

Finances – Understand and be transparent about the real costs of your project.

People – Strategize according to skill sets and availability. Use the org. chart in phase 2 of this blueprint as a starting place (slide 58).

Assets – Determine the tangible resources you may buy like software and licenses.

Stock photo of a thinking man.

3.1.3 Define resources

30 minutes

Input: Project documentation, Current resources

Output: List of resources for your PMO

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts

Participants: IT leaders/CIO, PMO director and/or portfolio manager, PMO staff, Project managers

Resources for your projects include staff, equipment, and materials. Resource management at the PMO level will help you manage those resources, get visibility into projects, and keep them moving forward. Be sure to consider the resources that will get your PMO off the ground.

Determine the resources you currently have and the resources your PMO will need and add them to your strategic plan:

  1. Finances — It’s essential that you know, and are transparent about, the real cost of creating your PMO and new process. Don’t forget to consider post deployment costs as well.
  2. People — Every project depends on the skill sets that individual team members bring to the table. Strategize according to these skill sets and their availability for the duration of a project. Some team members may have other work responsibilities and limited time for the project, so you need to accommodate this.
  3. Assets — These include the tangible resources you may have to buy, lease, or arrange for, such as workspace, software and licenses, computer hardware, testing equipment, and so on.

Step 3.2

Governance and OCM

Activities
  • 3.2.1 Governance
  • 3.2.2 OCM
  • 3.2.3 Perform a Change Impact Analysis
  • 3.2.4 Determine Dimensions of Change
  • 3.2.5 Determine Depth of Impact

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Assess/understand governance
  • Conduct impact analysis

This step involves the following participants:

  • PMO director and/or portfolio manager
  • PMO staff/stakeholders
  • Project managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Governance Structures
  • Organizational Change Management Impact Analysis Tool

Prepare an Actionable Roadmap for Your PMO

Step 3.1 Step 3.2

Clearly define the authority your PMO will have

The following section includes slides from Info-Tech’s Make Governance Adaptable blueprint. Download the blueprint to dive deeper into IT governance.

Governance is an important part of building a strong PMO. A PMO governance framework defines the authority and the support it requires to maximize portfolio and project management capabilities throughout the business. It should sit within your overall governance framework and as the PMO matures, its roles and responsibilities will also change to adapt with business demands and additional capabilities.

Your framework can:

  • Specify PMO authority
  • Introduce and apply process standards, polices, and directives as it pertains to project and portfolio management
  • Facilitate executive and leadership involvement
  • Foster a collaborative environment between the PMO and the business

A PMO governance framework enables PMO leaders to establish the common guidelines and manage the distribution of authority given to the PMO.

Visit Make Your IT Governance Adaptable

Stock photo of a group working together.

Common causes of poor governance

Key causes of poor or misaligned governance
  1. Governance and its value to your organization is not well understood, often being confused or integrated with more granular management activities.
  2. Business executives fail to understand that IT governance is a function of the business and not the IT department.
  3. Poor past experiences have made “governance” a bad word in the organization – a constraint and barrier that must be circumvented to get work done.
  4. There is misalignment between accountability and authority throughout the organization, and the wrong people are involved in governance practices.
  5. There is an unwillingness to change a governance approach that has served the organization well in the past, leading to challenges when the organization starts to change practices and speed of delivery.
  6. There is a lack of data and data-related capabilities required to support good decision making and the automation of governing decisions.
  7. The goals and strategy of the organization are not known or understood, leaving nothing for IT governance to orient around.
Five key symptoms of ineffective governance committees
  1. No actions or decisions are generated – The committee produces no value and makes no decisions after it meets. The lack of value output makes the usefulness of the committee questionable.
  2. Overallocation of resources – There is a lack of clear understanding of capacity and value in work to be done, leading to consistent underestimation of required resources and resource overallocation.
  3. Decisions are changed outside of committee – Decisions that are made or initiatives that are approved are changed when the proper decision makers are involved or the right information becomes available.
  4. Decisions conflict with organizational direction – Governance decisions conflict with organizational needs, showing a visible lack of alignment and behavioral disconnects that work against organizational success. Often due to power that’s not accounted for within the structure.
  5. Consistently poor outcomes are produced from governance direction – Lack of business acumen in members and relevant data or understanding of organizational goals drives poor measured outcomes from the decisions made in the committee.

IT PMO

Chair:
Updated:

Mandate

Ensure business value is achieved through information and technology (IT) investments by aligning strategic objectives and client needs with IT initiatives and their outcomes.

Committee Goals

  • Maximize throughput of the most valuable projects
  • Ensure visibility of current and pending projects
  • Minimize resource waste and optimize of alignment of skills to assignments
  • Clarify accountability for post-project benefits attainment and facilitate the tracking/reporting of those benefits
  • Drive approval and prioritization of IT initiatives based on their alignment with business goals and strategy
  • Establish a consistent process for handling intake/demand

Committee Metrics

  • % of approved IT initiatives that measure benefit achievement upon completion
  • % of IT initiatives with direct alignment to organizational strategic direction
  • % of initiatives approved by exception

Decisions and responsibilities by purpose

Responsibilities
STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT

Ensure initiatives align with organizational objectives
Embed strategic goals and prioritization approach within process
Define intake approach

VALUE DELIVERY
  • Ensure all IT initiatives have a defined value expectation (excepting innovation activities)
  • Approve and prioritize IT initiatives based on value
RISK MANAGEMENT

Assess risk as a factor of prioritizing and approving initiatives

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Decide on the allocation of IT resources

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

Ensure process is in place to measure and validate performance of IT initiatives

Committee Membership
Role

CIO, Product Owner, Service Owner, IT VPs, BRM, PMO Director, CISO/CRO

Individual

IT Steering Committee

Chair:
Updated:

Mandate

Ensure business value is achieved through information and technology (IT) investments by aligning strategic objectives and client needs with IT initiatives and their outcomes.

Committee Goals

  • Align IT initiatives with organizational goals
  • Evaluate, approve, and prioritize IT initiatives
  • Approve IT strategy
  • Reinforce (if provided) or establish risk appetite and threshold
  • Confirm value achievement of approved initiatives
  • Set target investment mix and optimize IT resource utilization

Committee Metrics

  • % of approved IT initiatives that meet or exceed value expectation
  • % of IT initiatives with direct alignment to organizational strategic direction
  • Level of satisfaction with IT decision making
  • % of initiatives approved by exception

Committee Overview

Committee Name Committee Membership Mandate
Executive Leadership Committee CEO, CFO, CTO, CDO, CISO/CRO, CIO, Enterprise Architect/Chief Architect, CPO Provide strategic and operational leadership to the company by establishing goals, developing strategy, and directing/validating strategic execution.
Enterprise Risk Committee CISO/CRO, CPO, Enterprise Risk Manager, BU Leaders, CFO, CTO, CDO Govern enterprise risks to ensure that risk information is available and integrated to support governance decision making. Ensure the definition of the organizational risk posture and that an enterprise risk approach is in place.
IT Steering Committee CIO, Product Owner, Service Owner, IT VPs, BRM, PMO Director, CISO/CRO Ensure business value is achieved through information and technology (IT) investments by aligning strategic objectives and client needs with IT initiatives and their outcomes.
IT Risk Council IT Risk Manager, CISO, IT Directors Govern IT risks within the context of business strategy and objectives to align the decision-making processes towards the achievement of performance goals. It will also ensure that a risk management framework is in place and risk posture (risk appetite/threshold) is defined.
PPM Portfolio Manager, Project Managers, BRMs Ensure the best alignment of IT initiatives and program activity to meet the goals of the business.
Architectural Review Board Service/Product Owners, Enterprise Architects, Chief Architect, Domain Architects Ensure enterprise and related architectures are managed and applied enterprise-wise. Ensure the alignment of IT initiatives to business strategy and architecture and compliance to regulatory standards. Establish architectural standards and guidelines. Review and recommend initiatives.
Change Advisory Board Service/Product Owner, Change Manager, IT Directors or Managers Ensure changes are assessed, prioritized, and approved to support the change management purpose of optimizing the throughput of successful changes with a minimum of disruption to business function.

Decisions and responsibilities by purpose

Responsibilities
STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT
  • Ensure initiatives align with organizational objectives
  • Approve strategies and policies that ensure the organization benefits from IT
  • Propose innovative uses of IT to enable the business to compete and perform better
  • Make decisions that account for human preferences and behavior
VALUE DELIVERY
  • Validate the achievement of benefits from IT initiatives
  • Ensure all IT initiatives have a defined value expectation (excepting innovation activities)
  • Ensure stakeholder value and value drivers are understood
  • Prioritize IT work based on value
  • Define a prioritization approach with stakeholders
RISK MANAGEMENT
  • Ensure creation, maintenance, and observation of policies and procedures, ensuring conformance where needed
  • Ensure ethical behavior in IT
  • Ensure IT meets the requirements of laws, regulations, and contracts
  • Develop or reinforce the risk appetite and threshold
  • Ensure risk management framework is in place
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
  • Identify the target investment mix
  • Decide on the allocation of IT resources
  • Define required IT capabilities
PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT
  • Confirm that IT supports business processes with the right capabilities and capacity
  • Ensure data is up to date and secure
  • Monitor the extent to which prioritization of IT resources matches organizational objectives
  • Measure extent to which IT supports the business
  • Measure adherence to regulations
Committee Membership
Role

CIO, Product Owner, Service Owner, IT VPs, BRM, PMO Director, CISO/CRO

Individual

Sample Governance Model

A sample governance model with four levels and roles dispersed throughout the levels with arrows indicating hierarchy. The levels are 'Enterprise: Defines organizational goals. Directs or regulates the performance and behavior of the enterprise, ensuring it has the structure and capabilities to achieve its goals', 'Strategic: Ensures IT initiatives, products, and services are aligned to organizational goals and strategy and provide expected value. Ensure adherence to key principles', 'Tactical: Ensures key activities and planning are in place to execute strategic initiatives', and 'Operational: Ensures effective execution of day-to-day functions and practices to meet their key objectives'. Roles in Enterprise are 'Board', 'Executive Leadership Committee', and 'Enterprise Risk Committee'. Roles in Strategic are 'IT Steering Committee', plus three half in Strategic, 'IT PMO', 'Architectural Review Board', and 'IT Risk Council'. One role is half in Strategic and half in Tactical, 'Change Advisory Board'.

3.2.1 Governance and authority

1-3 hours

Input: List of key tasks

Output: Initial Authority Map

Materials: Whiteboard/flip charts, Sticky notes, Strategic Plan

Participants: IT leadership, Portfolio Manager (PMO Director), PMO Admin Team, Project Managers

Now that you’ve determined the activities on your roadmap, it’s important to determine who is going to be responsible for the following:

  • Intake Scoring
  • Project Approvals
  • Staffing and Resource Management
  • Portfolio Reporting
  • Communications and Organizational Change Management
  • Benefits Attainment
  • Formalized Project Closure
  1. For each task have participants discuss who is ultimately accountable for the decision and who has the ultimate authority to make that decision.
  2. Place the sticky notes on the swim lanes in the strategic plan to represent the area or person has authority over it.
  3. Add all initiatives to your PMO governance framework.

Download the PMO Strategic Plan

Governance and Authority

Committee Name Committee Membership
Executive Leadership Committee CEO, CFO, CTO, CDO, CISO/CRO, CIO, Enterprise Architect/Chief Architect, CPO
Enterprise Risk Committee CISO/CRO, CPO, Enterprise Risk Manager, BU Leaders, CFO, CTO, CDO
IT Steering Committee CIO, Product Owner, Service Owner, IT VPs, BRM, PMO Director, CISO/CRO
IT Risk Council IT Risk Manager, CISO, IT Directors,
PPM Portfolio Manager, Project Managers, BRMs
Architectural Review Board Service/Product Owners, Enterprise Architects, Chief Architect, Domain Architects
Change Advisory Board Service/Product Owner, Change Manager, IT Directors or Managers

PMO Governance Framework

PMO Authority
  • Resource Management
  • Customer Relationship
  • Vendor & Contractor Relationships
  • Intake and Scoring
  • Project Approvals
  • Organizational Change Management
Standards and Policies
  • Portfolio Management Process
  • Project Governance
Guidelines
  • Project Classification Guidelines
Executive Oversight
  • Establish Steering Committees
  • Sponsorship
  • Spending Authorization
  • Execution Oversight
  • Spending Cessation
  • Benefits Attainment
  • Organizational Change Management

Customize groupings as appropriate.

Document key achievements governance initiatives.

Completed projects aren’t necessarily successful projects

The constraints that drive project management (time, scope, and budget) are insufficient for driving the overall success of project efforts.

For instance, a project may come in on time, on budget, and in scope, but…

  • …if users and stakeholders fail to adopt…
  • …and the intended benefits are not achieved...

…then that “successful project” represents a massive waste of the organization’s time and resources.

Organizational change management (OCM) is a supplement to project management that is needed to ensure the intended value is realized. It is the practice through which the PMO or other body can improve user adoption rates and maximize project benefits. Without it, IT might finish the project but the business might fail to recognize the intended benefits.

Start with next step and refer to Info-Tech research on OCM for a deeper dive. Impact analysis is the cornerstone of any OCM strategy. By shining a light on considerations that might have otherwise escaped project planners and decision makers, an impact analysis is an essential component to change management and project success.

Change Impact Analysis

  1. It is important to establish a process for analyzing how the change of your PMO roadmap processes will impact different areas of the business and how to manage these impacts. Analyze change impacts across multiple dimensions to ensure nothing is overlooked.
  2. A thorough analysis of change impacts will help the PMO processes:
    • Bypass avoidable problems.
    • Remove non-fixed barriers to success.
    • Acknowledge and minimize the impacts of unavoidable barriers.
    • Identify and leverage potential benefits.
    • Measure the success of the change.

3.2.2 Perform a change impact analysis to make your planning more complete

Use Info-Tech’s Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool to weigh all the factors involved in the change.

Info-Tech’s Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool helps to document the change impact across multiple dimensions, enabling you to review the analysis with others to ensure that the most important impacts are captured. The tool also helps to effectively monitor each impact throughout project execution.

  • Change impact considerations can include products, services, states, provinces, cultures, time zones, legal jurisdictions, languages, colors, brands, subsidiaries, competitors, departments, jobs, stores, locations, etc.
  • Each of these dimensions is an MECE (Mutually Exclusive, Collectively Exhaustive) list of considerations that could be impacted by the change. For example, a North American retail chain might consider “Time Zones” as a key dimension, which could break down as Newfoundland, Atlantic, Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific.

Sample of the Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool.

Download the Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool

3.2.3 Assess the current state of your project environment

15 minutes

The “2. Set Up” tab of the Impact Tool is where you enter project-specific data pertaining to the change initiative.

The inputs on this tab are used to auto-populate fields and drop-down menus on subsequent tabs of the analysis.

Document the stakeholders (by individual or group) associated with the project who will be subject to the impacts.

You are allowed up to 15 entries. Try to make this list comprehensive. Missing any key stakeholders will threaten the value of this activity as a whole.

If you find that you have more than 15 individual stakeholders, you can group individuals into stakeholder groups.

Sample of the Impact Analysis Tool Set-Up Tab. There is a space for 'Project Name' and a list of 'Project Stakeholders'.
Keep in mind…

An impact analysis is not a stakeholder management exercise.

Impact assessments cover:

  • How the change will affect the organization.
  • How individual impacts might influence the likelihood of adoption.

Stakeholder management covers:

  • Resistance/objections handling.
  • Engagement strategies to promote adoption.

We will cover the latter in the next step.

3.2.4 Determine the relevant considerations for analyzing the change impacts

15-30 minutes

Use the survey on tab 3 of the Impact Analysis Tool to determine the dimensions of change that are relevant.

The impact analysis is fueled by the 13-question survey on tab 3 of the tool.

This survey addresses a comprehensive assortment of change dimensions, ranging from customer-facing considerations to employee concerns, to resourcing, logistical, and technological questions.

Once you have determined the dimensions that are impacted by the change, you can go on to assess how individual stakeholders and stakeholder groups are affected by the change.

Sample of the Change Impact Survey on tab 3 of the Impact Analysis Tool.
Screenshot of tab “3. Impact Survey,” showing the 13-question survey that drives the impact analysis.

Ideally, the survey should be performed by a group of project stakeholders together. Use the drop-down menus in column K to record your responses.

Impacts will be felt differently by different stakeholders and stakeholder groups

As you assess change impacts, keep in mind that no impact will be felt the same across the organization. Depth of impact can vary depending on the frequency (will the impact be felt daily, weekly, monthly?), the actions necessitated by it (e.g. will it change the way the job is done or is it simply a minor process tweak?), and the anticipated response of the stakeholder (support, resistance, indifference?).

Use the Organizational Change Depth Scale below to help visualize various depths of impact. The deeper the impact, the tougher the job of managing change will be.

Procedural
Behavioral
Interpersonal
Vocational
Cultural
Procedural change involves changes to explicit procedures, rules, policies, processes, etc. Behavioral change is similar to procedural change, but goes deeper to involve the changing tacit or unconscious habits. Interpersonal change goes beyond behavioral change to involve changing relationships, teams, locations, reporting structures, and other social interactions. Vocational change requires acquiring new knowledge and skills and accepting the loss or decline in the value or relevance of previously acquired knowledge and skills. Cultural change goes beyond interpersonal and vocational change to involve changing personal values, social norms, and assumptions about the meaning of good vs. bad or right vs. wrong.
Example: providing sales reps with mobile access to the CRM application to let them update records from the field. Example: requiring sales reps to use tablets equipped with a custom mobile application for placing orders from the field. Example: migrating sales reps to work 100% remotely. Example: migrating technical support staff to field service and sales support roles. Example: changing the operating model to a more service-based value proposition or focus.

3.2.5 Determine the depth of each impact for each stakeholder group

1-3 hours

Tab “4. Impact Analysis” of the Analysis Tool contains the meat of the impact analysis activity.

  1. The “Impact Analysis” tab is made up of 13 change impact tables (see next slide for a screenshot of one of these tables).
    • You may not need to use all 13 tables. The number of tables you use coincides with the number of “yes” responses you gave in the previous tab.
    • If you do not need all 13 impact tables (i.e. if you do not answer “yes” to all thirteen questions in tab 2) the unused/unnecessary tables will not auto-populate.
  2. Use one table per change impact. Each of your “yes” responses from tab 3 will auto-populate at the top of each change impact table. You should go through each of your “yes” responses in turn.
  3. Analyze how each impact will affect each stakeholder or stakeholder group touched by the project.
    • Column B in each table will auto-populate with the stakeholder groups from the Set-Up tab.
  4. Use the drop-down menus in columns C, D, and E to rate the frequency of each impact, the actions necessitated by each impact, and the anticipated response of each stakeholder group.
    • Each of the options in these drop-down menus is tied to a ranking table that informs the ratings on the two subsequent tabs.
  5. If warranted, you can use the “Comments” cells in column F to note the specifics of each impact for each stakeholder/group.

See the next slide for an accompanying screenshot of a change impact table from tab 4 of the Analysis Tool.

Screenshot of “Impact Analysis” tab

Screenshot of the Impact analysis tab of the Analysis Tool.

The stakeholder groups entered on the Set Up tab will auto-populate in column B of each table.

Your “yes” responses from the survey tab will auto-populate in the cells to the right of the “Change Impact” cells.

Use the drop-down menus in this column to select how often the impact will be felt for each group (e.g. daily, weekly, periodically, one time, or never).

“Actions” include “change to core job duties,” “change to how time is spent,” “confirm awareness of change,” etc.

Use the drop-down menus to hypothesize what the stakeholder response might be. For the purpose of this impact analysis, a guess is fine. A more detailed communication plan can be created later.

Review your overall impact rating to help assess the likelihood of change adoption

Use the “Overall Impact Rating” on tab 5 to help right-size your OCM efforts.

Based upon your assessment of each individual impact, the Analysis Tool will provide you with an “Overall Impact Rating” in tab 5.

  • This rating is an aggregate of each of the individual change impact tables used during the analysis and the rankings assigned to each stakeholder group across the frequency, required actions, and anticipated response columns.
Projects in the red zone should have maximum change governance, applying a full suite of OCM tools and templates as well as revisiting the impact analysis exercise regularly to help monitor progress.

Increased communication and training efforts, as well as cross-functional partnerships, will also be key for success.

Projects in the yellow zone also require a high level of change governance.
Screenshot of 'Overall Impact Rating' scale on tab 5 of the Analysis Tool.
To free up resources for those OCM initiatives that require more discipline, projects in the green zone can ease up in their OCM efforts somewhat. With a high likelihood of adoption as is, stakeholder engagement and communication efforts can be minimized somewhat for these projects, so long as the PMO is in regular contact with key stakeholders.

Use the other outputs on tab 5 to help structure your OCM efforts

In addition to the overall impact rating, tab 5 has other outputs that will help you assess specific impacts and how the overall change will be received by stakeholders.

Screenshot of the Impact Analysis Outputs on tab 5 of the Analysis Tool. There are tables ranking risk impacts and stakeholders, as well as an impact zone map.

This table displays the highest risk impacts based on frequency and action inputs on tab 4.

Here you’ll find the stakeholders, ranked again based on frequency and action, who will be most impacted by the proposed changes.

These are the five stakeholders most likely to support changes, based on the Anticipated Response column on tab 4.

The stakeholder groups entered on the Set Up tab will auto-populate in column B of each table.

In addition to these outputs, this tab also lists top five change resistors and has an impact register and list of potential impacts to watch out for (i.e. your “maybe” responses from tab 3).

Establish Baseline Metrics

Baseline metrics will be improved through:

  • A strong PMO is one than can link performance to the overall goals of the organization.
  • Use these examples of KPIs to measure success.
Metric KPI
Portfolio Performance Return on Investment (ROI) for projects and programs
Alignment of spend with objectives
Resource Utilization Rate (hours allocated to projects actual vs. allocation)
Customer/Stakeholder Satisfaction
# of strategic projects approved vs. completed
Project/Program Performance % of completed projects (planned vs. actual)
% of projects completed on time (based on original due date)
% of projects completed on budget
% of projects delivering their expected business outcomes
Actual delivery of benefits vs. planned benefits
% of customer satisfaction
Project manager satisfaction rating
PMO % of approved IT initiatives that measure benefit achievement upon completion
% of IT initiatives with direct alignment to organizational strategic direction

Summary of Accomplishment

Problem Solved

Knowledge Gained
  • PMO Options and “Best Practices”
  • PMO Types
  • Key PMO Functions/Services

The PMO staffing model that you use will depend on many different factors. It is in your hands to create and define what your staffing needs are for your organization.

The success of your PMO is linked to the plan you create before executing on it.

Processes Optimized
  • Establishing organizational need.
  • Getting situational awareness to build a solid foundation for the PMO.
  • Identifying organizational design and establishing PMO structure and staffing needs.
  • Creating an actionable roadmap.

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech workshop.

Contact your account representative for more information.

workshops@infotech.com 1-888-670-8889

Summary of Accomplishment

Problem Solved

Deliverables Completed
  • PMO Role Development Tool
  • Initial PMO Mandate
  • PMO Job Description Builder Workbook
  • PMO job descriptions
  • PMO Strategic Plan
  • Organizational Change Impact Analysis Tool

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech workshop.

Contact your account representative for more information.

workshops@infotech.com 1-888-670-8889

Additional Support

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech workshop.

Photo of Ugbad Farah.

Contact your account representative for more information.

workshops@infotech.com 1-888-670-8889

To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.

Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

Sample of the Job Description Survey activity.
Job Description Survey
Use the survey to help determine potential role requirements across various project portfolio management, project management, business analysis, and organizational change management activities.
Sample of the Job Descriptions builder activity.
Create Your Job Descriptions
Use the job descriptions as a guide when creating your own job descriptions based on the outputs from the tool.

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Use your first 100 days as PMO leader to define a mandate for long-term success.

Bibliography

Alexander, Moira. “How to Develop a PMO Strategic Plan.” CIO, 11 July 2018. Web.

Barlow, Gina, Andrew Tubb, and Grant Riley. “Driving Business Performance. Project Management Survey 2017.” KPMG, 2017. Accessed 11 Jan. 2022.

Brennan, M. V., and G. Heerkens. “How we went from zero project management to PMO implementation—a real life story.” Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2009—North America, Orlando, FL. Project Management Institute, 13 October 2009. Web.

Casey, W., and W. Peck. “Choosing the right PMO setup.” PM Network, vol. 15, no. 2, 2001, pp. 40-47. Web.

“COBIT 2019 Framework Governance and Management Objectives.” ISACA, 2019. PDF.

Crawford, J. K. “Staffing your strategic project office: seven keys to success.” Paper presented at Project Management Institute Annual Seminars & Symposium, San Antonio, TX. Project Management Institute, 2002. Web.

Davis, Stanley M., and Paul R. Lawrence. “Problems of Matrix Organizations.” Harvard Business Review, May 1978. Web.

Dow, William D. “Chapter 6: The Tactical Guide for Building a PMO.” Dow Publishing, 2012. PDF.

Giraudo, L., and E. Monaldi. “PMO evolution: from the origin to the future.” Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2015—EMEA, London, England. Project Management Institute, 11 May 2015. Web.

Greengard, S. “No PMO? Know when you need one.” PM Network, vol. 27, no. 12, 2013, pp. 44-49. Web.

Hobbs, J. B., and M. Aubry. “What research is telling us about PMOs.” Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2009—EMEA, Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands. Project Management Institute, May 2009. Web.

Jordan, Andy. “Staffing the Strategic PMO.” ProjectManagement.com, 24 October 2016. Web.

Lang, Greg. “5 Questions to Answer When Building a Roadmap.” LinkedIn, 2 October 2016. Accessed 15 Apr. 2021.

Manello, Carl. “Establish a PMO Roadmap.” LinkedIn, 10 February 2021. Accessed 29 Mar. 2021.

Martin, Ken. “5 Steps to Set Up a Successful Project Management Office.” BrightWork, 9 July 2018. Accessed 29 Mar. 2021.

Miller, Jen A. “What Is a Project Management Office (PMO) and Do You Need One?” CIO, 19 October 2017. Accessed 16 Apr. 2021.

Needs, Ian. “Why PMOs Fail: 5 Shocking PMO Statistics.” KeyedIn, 6 January 2014. Web.

Ovans, Andrea. “Overcoming the Peter Principle.” Harvard Business Review, 22 December 2014. Web.

PMI®. “A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge.” 6th Ed. Project Management Institute, 2017.

PMI®. “Ahead of the Curve: Forging a Future-Focused Culture.” Pulse of the Profession. Project Management Institute, 11 February 2020. Accessed 21 April 2021.

PMI®. “Project Management: Job Growth and Talent Gap.” Project Management Institute, 2017. Web.

PMI®. “Pulse of the Profession: Success in Disruptive Times.” Project Management Institute, 2018. Web.

PMI®.“The Project Management Office: In Sync with Strategy.” Project Management Institute, March 2012. Web.

“Project Management Organizational Structures.” PM4Dev, 2016. Web.

Rincon, I. “Building a PMO from the ground up: Three stories, one result.” Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2014—North America, Phoenix, AZ. Project Management Institute, 26 October 2014. Web.

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Sexton, Peter. “Project Delivery Performance: AIPM and KPMG Project Management Survey 2020 - KPMG Australia.” KPMG, 9 November 2020. Web.

The Change Management Office (CMO). Prosci, n.d. Accessed 7 July 2021.

“The New Face of Strategic Planning.” Project Smart, 27 March 2009. Accessed 29 Mar. 2021.

“The State of Project Management Annual Survey.” Wellington PPM Intelligence, 2018. Web.

“The State of the Project Management Office : Enabling Strategy Execution Excellence.” PM Solutions Research, 2016. Web.

Wagner, Rodd. “New Evidence The Peter Principle Is Real - And What To Do About It.” Forbes, 10 April 2018. Accessed 14 Apr. 2021.

Wright, David. “Developing Your PMO Roadmap.” Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2012—North America, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Project Management Institute, 2012. Accessed 29 March 2021.

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Guided Implementation #1 - Define the PMO
  • Call #1 - Scope requirements, objectives, and your specific challenges.

Guided Implementation #2 - Staff the PMO
  • Call #1 - Assess current state and determine PMO role/type.
  • Call #2 - Complete job description survey.
  • Call #3 - Analyze survey results and complete FTE analysis.
  • Call #4 - Discuss necessary roles and create job descriptions.

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  • Call #1 - Discuss business goals and priorities.
  • Call #2 - Identify and prioritize initiatives on roadmap.
  • Call #3 - Discuss governance and organizational change management.
  • Call #4 - Summarize results in strategic plan and discuss next steps.

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