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Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture

Business capability maps, value streams, strategy maps, solution architectures for enterprise architects, and a catalog of resources for public health practice.

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  • Public health leadership requires a unified and validated view of business capabilities that help CIOs and the organization’s leadership accelerate the strategy design process that aligns key initiatives, business, and health information requirements with strategy and health information technology solutions.
  • In public health practice, the business and IT often focus on a singular project, ignoring the holistic impact and value of an overarching value stream and business capability view aligned with core functions and essential services.

Our Advice

Critical Insight

Using an industry-specific reference architecture is central and has many benefits to organizational priorities focused on enabling and enhancing capabilities associated with core functions and essential services. It is critical to understanding, modeling, and communicating the operating environment and the direction of the organization, but more significantly, to enabling measurable top-line organizational outcomes and the unlocking of direct value.

Impact and Result

  • Demonstrate the value of IT’s role in supporting the organization’s business capabilities while highlighting the importance of proper alignment between organizational and IT strategies.
  • Apply reference architecture techniques such as strategy maps, value streams, and capability maps to design usable and accurate blueprints of your public health organization’s operations.
  • Assess your initiatives and priorities to determine if you are investing in the right capabilities. Conduct capability assessments of core functions and essential services to identify opportunities and prioritize projects.

Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Research & Tools

1. Public Health Reference Architecture – Leverage an architected view of public health business capabilities to realize measurable core functions and essential services and unlock direct value.

This Reference Architecture Guide is designed to help healthcare and government industry members align with the business of public health practice. It provides tools to identify and assess core function health information management (HIM) and health information technology (HIT) capabilities and capacity including business capability maps, value streams, strategy maps, solution architectures for Enterprise Architects, and a catalog of resources for public health practice.

2. Reference Architecture Template for Public Health Practice – A structured tool to help you prioritize IT strategy activities and build a roadmap to ensure success.

Use this template to document your final strategy outputs including organization-defining core and support business capabilities, value streams, and strategy maps connecting business goals to public health core functions and essential services.

3. Public Health Solution Architecture Tool – A structured tool including business, data, application, and technology architectures for data and analytics modernization.

Public health solution architectures for enterprise architects depicting business, data, application, and technology layers for data and analytics modernization including data lakehouse architecture and views from four (4) personas – administrator, data engineer, data analyst, and data scientist.

4. Catalog of Resources – A comprehensive companion tool to strategically support and improve public health information management and health information technology service capability and capacity.

A comprehensive list of business-aligned health information management and health information technology solution sets including diagnostics, blueprints, workshops, concierge, and consulting services that address the data, analytics, and technology landscape supporting public health core functions and essential services capabilities.

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Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Guide

Business Capability Maps, Value Streams, Strategy Maps, Solution Architectures for Enterprise Architects, and a Catalog of Resources for Public Health Practice

Analyst Perspective

In the age of digital transformation toward data and analytics modernization, IT must align with the business of public health practice and focus on future enabling value realization at a time when AI and machine learning are poised to disrupt every industry.

An industry reference architecture helps accelerate your strategy design process and enhances the IT leadership team’s ability to align people, processes, and technology with key business priorities.

Public health professionals require a unified and validated view of their business capabilities that aligns core functions, essential services, and strategy to provide value to diverse populations served.

Public health is tasked with protecting the public, promoting health and well-being, and increasing health equity. Public health IT professionals have a role to play in empowering the workforce and enhancing service delivery through optimized data and technology.

Public health budgets are under constant strain due to pressures from government appropriations and funding allocation directives and limits, procurement requirements, and workforce costs, among other pressures.

The technical environment supporting the provision of public health services is rapidly changing with myriad new solutions and platforms to digitally transform and future enable the foundation and core functions of public health practice: assessment, policy development, and assurance.

This reference architecture guide is designed to help healthcare and government industry members align with the business of public health practice, and it provides tools to identify and assess core function health information management (HIM) and health information technology (HIT) capabilities and capacity, including business capability maps, value streams, strategy maps, solution architectures for enterprise architects, and a catalog of resources for public health practice.

The image contains a picture of Neal Rosenblatt.

Neal Rosenblatt

Principal Research Director, Public Health

Info-Tech Research Group

Executive Summary

Your Challenge

Common Obstacles

Info-Tech’s Approach

  • You are a CIO, CTO, applications lead, or head of EA who needs to improve your organization’s understanding of business capabilities and how IT can support them.
  • Public health organizations want to sharpen their alignment and focus on organizational outcomes and value by using architecture to better inform their IT governance, stakeholder management, and IT strategy capabilities.
  • Before executing any strategic initiatives, use this blueprint to understand how the organization creates value and the underlying capabilities and processes of the organization.

You don’t know where or how to begin, or how to engage the right people, model the business, and drive the value of business architecture in public health practice.

The business of public health practice and IT often speak in their own languages without a holistic and integrated view of mission, strategies, goals, processes, and projects.

Business and IT often focus on a single project, ignoring the holistic value of an overarching value stream and business capability view in alignment with core functions and essential services.

  • Build your organization’s capability map by defining the organization’s value stream and validating the industry reference architecture.
  • Use business capabilities to define strategic focus by defining the organization’s key capabilities and developing a prioritized strategy map.
  • Assess key capabilities for planning priorities through a review of business processes, information, applications, and technology support of key capabilities.
  • Adopt capability-based strategy planning by ongoing identification and road mapping of capability gaps.

Info-Tech Insight

Using an industry-specific reference architecture is central, and has many benefits, to organizational priorities. It is critical to understanding, modeling, and communicating the operating environment and the direction of the organization, but, more significantly, to enabling measurable top-line organizational outcomes and unlocking direct value.

The image contains a screenshot of the thought model Reference Architecture Framework.

Industry overview: public health

Public health departments are engaged in the science and art of preventing disease and promoting health through informing society, including public and private institutions, communities, and individuals. Additionally, public health is tasked with helping people prevent injury, illness and premature death. Public health programs are supported by federal, state/provincial, and local governments and aims to reduce the incidents and prevalence of disease, disability, and mental health conditions. Public health is interdisciplinary and involves professionals from a range of fields including epidemiology, biostatistics, behavioral health, mental health, oral health, environmental health, nutrition, health education, health promotion, community medicine, social sciences, and management of health services.

Public health challenges are on the rise, and increasing weather-related emergencies and global pandemics like COVID-19 have put the importance of competent public health practice into sharp focus. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed a framework that describes the public health activities that all communities pursue called the 10 Essential Public Health Services. Originally released in 1994, this framework was revised in 2020 and promotes the health of all people. “The Essential Public Health Services actively promote policies, systems, and overall community conditions that enable optimal health for all and seek to remove systemic and structural barriers that have resulted in health inequities,” (CDC, 2020). Barriers that result in health inequities include poverty, racism, gender discrimination, ableism, and other forms of oppression.

Public health technologists are engaged in initiatives to improve outcomes for populations, and this guide outlines the various defining, shared, and enabling capabilities that will support the three core public health functions – assessment, policy development and assurance.

The image contains a diagram of the value stream.
Figure above: Value stream for the public health industry

Public value realization

Public value defines the success criteria of an organization as manifested through organizational goals and outcomes, and it is interpreted from four perspectives:

  • Public safety: Initiatives that result in an informed populace that are generated from a business capability enabled by modern technologies.
  • Cost reduction: The cost reduction when performing business capabilities with a product that is enabled with modern technologies.
  • Service enablement: The productivity and efficiency gains of internal business operations from products and capabilities enhanced with modern technologies.
  • Community outreach: Improving outreach efforts and providing insights related to public health initiatives in existing or new communities.
The image contains a screenshot of the Business Value Matrix. The matrix considers: Community Outreach, Public Safety, Service enablement, and Cost reduction.

Value, goals, and outcomes cannot be achieved without business capabilities

Break down your business goals into strategic and achievable initiatives focused on specific value streams and business capabilities.

The image contains a screenshot of an example of the text above. There is an example of breaking down business goals into business initiatives, then into specific value streams and capabilities.

Public health business capability map

The image contains a screenshot of the Public health business capability map.
Source: CDC, 2020

Business capability map defined...

In business architecture, the primary view of an organization is known as a business capability map.

A business capability defines what a business does to enable value creation, rather than how. Business capabilities:

  • Represent stable business functions.
  • Are unique and independent of each other.
  • Typically will have a defined business outcome.

A business capability map provides details that help the business architecture practitioner direct attention to a specific area of the business for further assessment.

Soon to be available in ArchiMate Metamodels for enterprise architects. Download theSolution Architectures Tool

PowerPoint version available here

Glossary of key concepts

A business reference architecture consists of a set of models to provide clarity and actionable insight and value. Typical techniques and terms used in developing these models are:

Industry value chain

Definition

Industry value chain

A high-level analysis of how the industry creates value for the stakeholder as an overall end-to-end process.

Business capability map

The primary visual representation of the organization’s key capabilities. This model forms the basis of strategic planning discussions.

Industry value streams

The specific set of activities an industry practitioner undertakes to create and capture value for and from the end user or stakeholder.

Strategic objectives

A set of standard strategic objectives that most industry practitioners will feature in their organization or agency plans.

Industry strategy map

A visualization of the alignment between the organization’s strategic direction and its key capabilities.

Capability assessments

Based on people, process, information, and technology, a heat-mapping effort that analyzes the strength of each key capability.

Capability

An ability that an organization, person, or system possesses. Capabilities are typically expressed in general and high-level terms and typically require a combination of organization, people, processes, and technology to achieve.

Source: The Open Group, 2009

Tools and templates to compile and communicate your reference architecture work

The image contains a screenshot of the Public Health Industry Reference Architecture Template.
  • The Public Health Industry Reference Architecture Template is a place for you to collect all the activity outputs and outcomes you’ve completed for use in next steps.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Info-Tech's methodology for reference architecture

1.Build your organization’s capability map 2.Use business capabilities to define strategic focus 3.Assess key capabilities for planning priorities 4.Adopt capability based strategy planning

Phase Steps

1.1 Define the organization’s value stream

1.2 Develop a business capability map

2.1 Define the organization’s key capabilities

2.2 Develop a strategy map

3.1 Business process review

3.2 Information assessment

3.3 Technology opportunity identification

4.1 Consolidate & prioritize capability gaps

Phase Outcomes

  • Defined & validated value streams specific to your organization
  • A validated Level 1 business capability map
  • Decomposed Level 2 capabilities
  • Identification of Level 1 cost advantage creators
  • Identification of Level 1 competitive advantage creators
  • Defined future state capabilities
  • Identification of capability process enablement
  • Identification of capability data support
  • Identification of capability application and technology support
  • Prioritization of key capability gaps

Info-Tech offers various levels of support to best suit your needs

DIY Toolkit

Guided Implementation

Workshop

Consulting

“Our team has already made this critical project a priority, and we have the time and capability, but some guidance along the way would be helpful.” “Our team knows that we need to fix a process, but we need assistance to determine where to focus. Some check-ins along the way would help keep us on track.” “We need to hit the ground running and get this project kicked off immediately. Our team has the ability to take this over once we get a framework and strategy in place.” “Our team does not have the time or the knowledge to take this project on. We need assistance through the entirety of this project.”

Diagnostics and consistent frameworks used throughout all four options

Guided Implementation

What does a typical GI on this topic look like?

Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4

Call #1: Introduce Info-Tech’s industry reference architecture methodology.

Call #2: Define & create value streams.

Call #4: Map value streams to business capabilities.

Call #6: Create a strategy map.

Call #8: Review capability assessment map(s).

Call #3: Model Level 1 business capability maps.

Call #5: Model Level 2 business capability maps.

Call #7: Introduce Info-Tech's capability assessment framework.

Call #9: Discuss & review prioritization of key capability gaps & plan next steps.

A Guided Implementation (GI) is a series of calls with an Info-Tech analyst to help implement our best practices in your organization. A typical GI is between 6 to 9 calls over the course of 1 to 4 months.

Additional Support

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech Workshop.

The image contains a picture of Neal Rosenblatt.

Contact your account representative for more information.
workshops@infotech.com

1-888-670-8889

To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.

Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

The image contains a screenshot of the Model Level 1, 2, 3 business capability maps. The image contains a screenshot of the Review capability assessment map(s).

Model Level 1, 2 & 3 business capability maps.

Using the business capability map as an accelerator, Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to modify and validate the business capability map to suit your organization’s context.

Review capability assessment map(s).

Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to review the various capability assessment maps and identify value opportunities within your organization.

Phase 1

Build Your Organization's Capability Map

Public Health Industry Reference Architecture

Phase 1

Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4

1.1 Define the organization’s value stream

1.2 Develop a business capability map

2.1 Define the organization’s key capabilities

2.2 Develop a strategy map

3.1 Business process review

3.2 Information assessment

3.3 Technology opportunity identification

4.1 Consolidate & prioritize capability gaps

This phase will walk you through the following activities:

  • Identify & assemble key stakeholders
  • Determine how the organization creates value
  • Define & validate value streams
  • Determine which business capabilities support value streams
  • Accelerate the process with an industry reference architecture
  • Validate the business capability map
  • Establish Level 2 (& 3) capability decomposition priorities
  • Decompose Level 2 (& 3) capabilities

This phase involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Step 1.1

Define the organization's value stream

Activities

1.1.1 Identify & assemble key stakeholders

1.1.2 Determine how the organization creates value

1.1.3 Define & validate value streams

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Identify & assemble key stakeholders
  • Determine how the organization creates value
  • Define & validate value streams

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Defined & validated value streams specific to your organization

1.1.1 Identify & assemble key stakeholders

1-3 hours

Build an accurate depiction of the business.

  1. It is important to make sure the right stakeholders participate in this exercise. The exercise of identifying capabilities for an organization is very introspective and requires deep analysis.
  2. Consider:
    1. Who are the decision makers and key influencers?
    2. Who will impact the business capability work? Who has a vested interest in the success or failure of the outcome?
    3. Who has the skills and competencies necessary to help you be successful?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't focus on the organizational structure and hierarchy. Often stakeholder groups don't fit the traditional structure.
    2. Don't ignore subject-matter experts on either the business or IT side. You will need to consider both.
Input Output
  • List of who is accountable for key business areas and decisions
  • Organizational chart
  • List of who has decision-making authority
  • A list of the key stakeholders
  • Prioritized list of decision-making support needs
  • Reference Architecture Template
Materials Participants
  • Whiteboard/Flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientist
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Define the organization's value streams

  • Value streams connect business goals to the organization’s value realization activities. They enable your organization at all levels – enterprise, agency, department, and program – to create and capture value by engaging in a set of interconnected activities. Those activities are dependent upon the specific core functions and essential services your organization seeks to improve. Value streams can extend beyond the organization into the supporting ecosystem, whereas business processes are contained and controlled within the organization at the level of value realization activity.
  • There are two types of value streams: core value streams and support value streams. Core value streams are mostly externally facing: they deliver value to either an external or internal stakeholder, program, or end user(s), and they are tied to the organization’s strategy map. Support value streams are internally facing and provide the foundational support for an organization to operate.
  • An effective method for ensuring all value streams have been considered is to understand that there can be different end-value receivers. Info-Tech recommends identifying and organizing the value streams with stakeholders, business units, programs, and end users as end-value receivers.

What is a value stream?

The image contains an example of value streams. The value stream starts with industry value chains, which connects to value receivers, and finally reaches the value streams.

What is a value stream in public health practice?

The image contains an example of what a value stream looks like in public health practice.

Value stream descriptions for public health defining capabilities

Tier 1 core value stream: connect business goals to the organization’s defining value realization capabilities.

Defining capabilities: the activities that define the business of public health practice. They support specific core function value streams.

The image contains Tier 1 core value stream, where its diagram demonstrates Public Health Core Functions and Essential Public Health Services.
Source: CDC, 2020

Value stream descriptions for public health shared capabilities

Tier 2 support value stream: connect business goals to the organization’s defining core functions, essential services, and value realization capabilities.

Shared capabilities: business-aligned capabilities that realize the organization’s defining core functions and essential services.

The image contains a screenshot of the support value stream. The diagram demonstrate the tier 2 support value stream, and the shared capabilities.

Determine how the organization creates value

Begin the process by identifying and locating the business mission & vision statements.

  • Websites
  • Streategy Documents
  • Leadership

What is Business Context?

"The business context encompasses an understanding of the factors impacting the business from various perspectives, including how decisions are made and what the business is ultimately trying to achieve. The business context is used by IT to identify key implications for the execution of its strategic initiatives."

Source: Businesswire, 2018

1.1.2 Determine how the organization creates value

1-3 hours

The first step of delivering value is defining how it will happen.

  1. Use the organization’s industry segment to start a discussion about how value is created for customers. Working back from the moment value is realized by the customer, consider the sequential steps required to deliver value in your industry segment.
  2. Consider:
    1. Who are your customers?
    2. What tasks are your customers looking to accomplish?
    3. How does your organization's set of products and services help them accomplish that?
    4. What are the benefits the organization delivers to them?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't boil the ocean. Focus on your industry segment and how you deliver value to your partners and customers specifically.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

1.1.2 Determine how the organization creates value

Input Output Materials Participants
  • Business strategy
  • Financial statements
  • Results of SWOT analysis
  • Info-Tech’s industry-specific reference architecture accelerator.
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Whiteboard/Flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

1.1.3 Define & validate value streams

1-3 hours

Unify the organization's perspective on how it creates value.

  1. Write a short description of the value stream that includes a statement about the value provided and a clear start and end for the value stream. Validate the accuracy of the descriptions with your key stakeholders.
  2. Consider:
    1. How does the organization deliver those benefits?
    2. How does the customer receive the benefits?
    3. What is the scope of your value stream? What will trigger the stream to start and what will the final value be?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't start with a blank page. Use Info-Tech's value stream definitions on the previous slide as a starting point and customize from there.
InputOutput
  • Business strategy
  • Info-Tech’s industry-specific reference architecture accelerator.
  • List of organization-specific value streams
  • Detailed value stream definition(s)
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Step 1.2

Develop a business capability map

Activities

1.2.1 Determine which business capabilities support value streams

1.2.2 Accelerate the process with an industry reference architecture

1.2.3 Validate the business capability map

1.2.4 Establish Level 2 (& 3) capability decomposition priorities

1.2.5 Decompose Level 2 (& 3) capabilities

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Determine which business capabilities support value streams
  • Accelerate the process with an industry reference architecture
  • Validate the business capability map
  • Establish Level 2 (& 3) capability decomposition priorities
  • Decompose Level 2 (& 3) capabilities

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • A validated Level 1 business capability map
  • Decomposed Level 2 (& 3) capabilities

Develop a business capability map by levels

  • Business architecture consists of a set of techniques to create multiple views of an organization; the primary view is known as a business capability map.
  • A business capability defines what a business does to enable value creation and achieve outcomes, rather than how they do it. In the private sector, business capabilities are typically business terms defined using descriptive nouns such as “marketing” or “research and development.” They represent stable business functions, are unique and independent of each other, and will usually have a defined business outcome. In the public sector, however, business capabilities can sometimes be articulated as business services. In public health practice, for example, the 10 essential services can be thought of as business capabilities that define or realize core functions. In both private and public sector approaches, business capabilities should not be defined as organizational units and are typically longer lasting than organizational structures.
  • A business capability mapping process should begin at the highest-level view of an organization, Level 1, which presents the entire business on a page. Level 2 and Level 3 capabilities, if needed, provide additional levels of detail that realize and further define Level 1 functions.
  • An effective method of organizing business capabilities is to split them into logical groupings or categories. In public health practice, at the highest level, capabilities are either “core” (externally or internally facing functions), “supporting” (internally facing functions), or “enabling” (cross-cutting functions).
  • As a best practice, Info-Tech recommends dividing business capabilities into the categories illustrated below:
The image contains a screenshot of the Business Capability Map by Levels. The levels are: core, supporting, cross-cutting.

Business capability map for public health

The image contains a screenshot of the business capability map for public health.

Source: CDC, 2020

1.2.1 Determine which business capabilities support value streams

1-3 hours

Deconstruct value streams into their component capabilities.

  1. Analyze the value streams to identify and describe the organization's capabilities that support them. This stage requires a good understanding of the business and will be a critical foundation for the business capability map.
  2. Consider:
    1. What is the objective of your value stream? This can highlight which capabilities support which value streams.
    2. What are the activities that make up the business?
    3. Segmenting your value stream into individual stages will give you a better understanding of the steps involved in creating value.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't do this alone. Make sure the right stakeholders participate. The exercise of identifying capabilities for an organization is very introspective and requires deep analysis. It is challenging to develop a common language that everyone will understand and be able to apply. Don't waste your efforts building an inaccurate depiction of the business.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

1.2.1 Determine which business capabilities support value streams

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Value streams from previous activities
  • List of organization-specific capabilities mapped to value streams
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

1.2.2 Accelerate the process with an industry reference architecture

1-3 hours

It's never a good idea to start with a blank page.

  1. The business capability map on the previous slide can be used as an accelerator. Assemble the relevant stakeholders – business unit leads and product/service owners – and modify the business capability map to suit your organization's context.
  2. Consider:
    1. What are the activities that make up your business?
    2. Can these activities be tied to outcomes? If not, they might not apply to your organization.
    3. Are there any capabilities on the map that don't fit the organization? Deselect them if yes.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't repeat capabilities. Capabilities are typically mutually exclusive activities.
    2. Don't include temporary initiatives. Capabilities should be stable over time. The people, processes, and technologies that support capabilities will change continuously.

Customize generic capability maps with the assistance of our industry analysts.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

1.2.2 Accelerate the process with an industry reference architecture

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Value streams from previous activities
  • Info-Tech’s industry-specific reference architecture accelerator.
  • List of organization-specific capabilities mapped to value streams
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

1.2.3 Validate the business capability map

1-3 hours

Crowdsource the capability map validation.

  1. Validate the capability map with the executive team (those who were not included) and other key stakeholders. Use validation of your business capability map as an excuse to start a conversation regarding the organization's overall strategy.
  2. Consider:
    1. Are there any sensitive areas of the organization that may take this effort the wrong way? Engage them to get their input as early as possible to ensure they don't feel left out or alienated.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't delay validating the maps with top-level executives. Without their support, your architecture practice won't be taken seriously.
    2. Don't leave anyone out on the assumption that they won't be interested. This process will foster alignment between organizational silos
InputOutput
  • List of organization-specific capabilities mapped to value streams
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Level 1 business capability map
  • Reference Architecture Template
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Develop a business capability map – Level 2

  • Level 2 business capabilities define individual Level 1 capabilities at a more granular level of detail. Level 2 capabilities typically represent individual stable business functions that, while unique and independent of each other, typically will have a collection of processes with overall contribution and enablement of Level 1 capability. If Level 3 capabilities are included, they further define Level 2 capabilities.
The image contains a screenshot of a business capability map - level 2.

1.2.4 Establish Level 2 capability decomposition priorities

1-3 hours

Deconstruct Level 1 capabilities into their component capabilities.

  1. Analyze the Level 1 business capabilities to identify and describe at a deeper, more granular level the organization's capabilities that support them. This stage requires a good understanding of the business and will be a critical foundation for the Level 2 business capability map.
  2. Consider:
    1. Which Level 1 capabilities enable the most critical stage of my value stream?
    2. Which Level 1 capabilities enable the most stages of the value stream?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't try to cut corners. Although it may seem tempting to jump right to this step and avoid doing your Level 1 mapping, you will run the risk of model pollution. Starting with Level 1 helps ensure you have a unified view of your organization's capabilities and will help you avoid having to redo the work later.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

1.2.4 Establish Level 2 capability decomposition priorities

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Level 1 capabilities map and a value stream for areas of interest and focus
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Prioritized list of Level 1 business capabilities for decomposition
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientist
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

1.2.5 Decompose Level 2 capabilities

1-3 hours

Deconstruct Level 1 capabilities into their component Level 2 capabilities.

  1. Using the Level 1 capability map as a baseline, hold working sessions with line of business represented for each (or selected) Level 1 capability or set of related capabilities and decompose them.
  2. Consider:
    1. Will you want to go deeper to Level 3? If so, then confirm if the same team for Level 2 has knowledge of Level 3+ and decompose to Level 3 concurrently.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't do this alone.Make sure the right stakeholders participate. The exercise of identifying Level 2+ capabilities for an organization is very introspective and requires deep analysis and understanding of business functions and processes. It is challenging to develop a common language that everyone will understand and be able to apply. Don't waste your efforts building an inaccurate depiction of the business.
InputOutput
  • Prioritized list of Level 1 business capabilities for decomposition
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Level 2 capabilities for areas of interest and focus
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Level 2 capability decomposition

The image contains a screenshot of Level 2 capability decomposition.

Develop a business capability map – Level 3

  • Level 3 business capabilities define individual Level 2 capabilities at a more granular level of detail. Level 3 capabilities typically represent individual stable business functions that, while unique and independent of each other, typically will have a collection of processes with overall contribution and enablement of corresponding Level 2 capabilities.
The image contains a screenshot of a business capability map - level 3.

1.2.6 Establish Level 3 capability decomposition priorities

1-3 hours

Deconstruct Level 3 capabilities into their component capabilities.

  1. Analyze the Level 2 business capabilities to identify and describe at a deeper, more granular level the organization's capabilities that support them. This stage requires a good understanding of the business and will be a critical foundation for the Level 3 business capability map.
  2. Consider:
    1. Which Level 2 capabilities enable the most critical stage of my value stream?
    2. Which Level 2 capabilities enable the most stages of the value stream?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't try to cut corners. Although it may seem tempting to jump right to this step and avoid doing your Level 2 mapping, you will run the risk of model pollution. Starting with Level 2 helps ensure you have a unified view of your organization's capabilities and will help you avoid having to redo the work later.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

1.2.6 Establish Level 3 capability decomposition priorities

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Level 2 capabilities map and a value stream for areas of interest and focus
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Prioritized list of Level 2 business capabilities for decomposition
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

1.2.7 Decompose Level 3 capabilities

1-3 hours

Deconstruct Level 2 capabilities into their component Level 3 capabilities.

  1. Using the Level 2 capability map as a baseline, hold working sessions with the line of business represented for each (or selected) Level 3 capability or set of related capabilities and decompose them.
  2. Avoid:
    1. Don't do this alone. Make sure the right stakeholders participate. The exercise of identifying Level 3+ capabilities for an organization is very introspective and requires deep analysis and understanding of business functions and processes. It is challenging to develop a common language that everyone will understand and be able to apply. Don't waste your efforts building an inaccurate depiction of the business.
InputOutput
  • Prioritized list of Level 2 business capabilities for decomposition
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Level 3 capabilities for areas of interest and focus
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Level 3 capability decomposition

The image contains a screenshot of level 3 capapbility decomposition.

Additional Support

If you would like additional supportm have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech Workshop.

The image contains a picture of Neal Rosenblatt.

Contact your account representative for more information.
workshops@infotech.com

1-888-670-8889

To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.

Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

The image contains a screenshot of the Model Level 1, 2, 3 business capability maps.The image contains a screenshot of the Review capability assessment map(s).

Model Level 1, 2 & 3 business capability maps.

Using the business capability map as an accelerator, Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to modify and validate the business capability map to suit your organization’s context.

Review capability assessment map(s).

Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to review the various capability assessment maps and identify value opportunities within your organization.

Phase 2

Use Business Capabilities to Define Strategic Focus

Phase 1

Phase 2Phase 3Phase 4

1.1 Define the organization’s value stream

1.2 Develop a business capability map

2.1 Define the organization’s key capabilities

2.2 Develop a strategy map

3.1 Business process review

3.2 Information assessment

3.3 Technology opportunity identification

4.1 Consolidate & prioritize capability gaps

This phase will walk you through the following activities:

  • Determine cost advantage creators
  • Determine competitive advantage creators
  • Define key future-state capabilities
  • Identify the strategic objectives for the business
  • Map strategic objectives to IT programs
  • Validate the strategy map & program prioritization

This phase involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Step 2.1

Define the organization's key capabilities

Activities

2.1.1 Determine cost advantage creators

2.1.2 Determine competitive advantage creators

2.1.3 Define key future-state capabilities

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Determine cost advantage creators
  • Determine competitive advantage creators
  • Define key future-state capabilities

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Identification of Level 1 & 2 cost advantage creators
  • Identification of Level 1 & 2 competitive advantage creators
  • Defined future-state capabilities

Define the organization's key capabilities

  • A discussion about the key or most critical capabilities is an excellent opportunity for IT leaders to review, refresh, and even reset expectations from the business as to what value IT should be providing to the organization. There is often misalignment as to whether, or to what extent, IT should be making strategic investments to help the business enhance its capabilities through technology. Some IT leaders believe they should be transforming the organization, while their agency or department leadership wants them to focus on operational efficiencies.
  • Depending on the mandate from the business – whether at the agency, departmental, or lower business unit levels – an IT leader may focus on developing enhancements for the organization by directing technology efforts to capabilities that deliver efficiency gains. This is often the case for many IT leaders for whom the primary role of IT is to enable the business to deliver its programs and services to the communities and stakeholders it serves as efficiently as possible. In various industries, these capabilities are known as cost advantage creators. In health and human services, we might think of these capabilities as essential services delivery enablers that help drive operational efficiencies.
  • Private sector organizations can develop a competitive advantage over their industry counterparts by creating a differentiated experience for the organization’s customers. Similarly, public sector organizations, like public health, can develop facilitators toward modernizing assessment, policy development, and assurance core functions by creating improvements in essential services delivery. Increasingly, this is facilitated and made possible through technology. IT units can direct investment into business-aligned capabilities that will improve their organization’s capacity as a service and focus on developing service optimization by directing efforts onto capabilities that are end-user facing. In various industries, these are known as the organization’s competitive advantage creators. In health and human services, we might think of these capabilities as health status or social services improvement facilitators.
The image contains a screenshot of the Private Sector Service Delivery.

Defining key capabilities for public health

The image contains a screenshot of the defining key capabilities for public health.

2.1.1 Determine cost advantage creators

1-3 hours

Focus on capabilities that drive a cost advantage for your organization.

  1. If your organization has a cost advantage over competitors, the capabilities that enable it should be identified and prioritized. Highlight these capabilities and prioritize the programs that support them.
  2. Consider:
    1. What is the source of your cost advantage? IT should support the capabilities that drive the cost advantage.
    2. Is the industry you operate in sensitive to prices?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't focus on capabilities that create an unsustainable cost advantage. Take a long-term perspective and allocate your resources wisely.
InputOutput
  • Value stream, Level 0 and Level 1 capabilities from previous activities
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Identified cost advantage creating capabilities
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

2.1.2 Determine competitive advantage creators

1-3 hours

Prioritize capabilities that give your organization an edge over rivals.

  1. If your organization does not have a cost advantage over competitors, determine if it can deliver differentiated end-customer experiences. Once you have identified the competitive advantages, understand which capabilities enable them. These capabilities are critical to the success of the organization and should be highly supported.
  2. Consider:
    1. Are there any products or services your organization provides that customers consider superior to competitive offerings?
    2. Which capabilities enable the competitive advantage?
    3. How easy is it for competitors to neutralize your competitive advantage? Focus on the capabilities that are difficult to replicate by competitors to create a more sustainable advantage.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't determine the competitive advantages alone. Incorporate various perspectives from throughout the organization to truly understand how the organization competes in the marketplace.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

2.1.2 Determine competitive advantage creators

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Value stream, Level 1 and Level 2 capabilities from previous activities
  • Cost advantage creators from previous activity
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Identified competitive advantage creating capabilities
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

2.1.3 Define key future-state capabilities

1-3 hours

Know where you want to go and chart a course to get there.

  1. In addition to the current cost and competitive advantage creators, the organization may have the intention to enhance existing or develop new capabilities. Discuss and select the capabilities that will help drive the attainment of future goals.
  2. Consider:
    1. Are your competitors doing anything to give them a competitive advantage? Can your organization easily replicate the capabilities needed to neutralize that advantage?
    2. How is the external environment (political, economic, social, or technological) likely going to change in the future? How might these changes impact your current key capabilities?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't blindly copy your competitors' strategies. It is important to understand that each organization is unique; before focusing on key capabilities that might neutralize your competitors' advantages, ensure they fit well with your overall strategy.
InputOutput
  • Value stream, Level 0 and Level 1 capabilities from previous activities
  • Cost advantage creators from previous activity
  • Competitive advantage creators from previous activity
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Identified enhancements to existing or new organizational capabilities
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Step 2.2

Develop a strategy map

Activities

2.2.1 Identify the strategic objectives for the business

2.2.2 Map strategic objectives to IT programs

2.2.3 Validate the strategy map & program prioritization

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Identify the strategic objectives for the business
  • Map strategic objectives to IT programs
  • Validate the strategy map & program prioritization

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO, VP Applications, VP Infrastructure
  • Portfolio manager (PMO director)
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Identification of business strategic objectives
  • Defined & validated strategy map/goal cascade

2.2 Develop a strategy map

  • A strategy map is a tool to help narrow the focus onto what matters most. With ever-changing resources, business strategies, and external environments, the strategy map can ensure IT is consistently providing value through the enhanced prioritization of IT programs.
  • Strategy mapping is a technique that helps the executive suite communicate the business strategy to other levels of the organization by visually representing the organizational strategic objectives and mapping each of them to value streams, business capabilities, and ultimately, to specific IT programs. There are five layers to a strategy map: strategic business goals, business initiatives, value streams, business capabilities, and IT programs.
  • Strategic business goals are the targets and outcomes that the organization is looking to achieve.
  • Value streams enable an organization to create and capture value in the market through interconnected activities that support strategic objectives.
  • Business capabilities define what a business does to enable value creation in value streams, rather than how.
  • IT programs are actionable descriptions of how the IT department will enable one or multiple business capabilities in its target state.
The image contains a screenshot of a strategy map.

2.2.1 Identify the strategic goals & outcomes for the business

1-3 hours

Knowing the key strategic objectives for the business will drive business-IT alignment.

  1. It is important to make sure the right strategic objectives of the organization have been identified and are well understood. Engage the right stakeholders to help identify and document the key strategic objectives for the business.
  2. Consider:
    1. What are your targets for the organization?
    2. What are the organization's strategic investment goals?
    3. What are the goals of the organization over the next 12 months?
    4. What are your top business initiatives over the next 12 months?
    5. Are there external forces that will impact the current strategic objectives?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't simply go with the existing documented strategic objectives for the business. Ensure they are up to date and interview the decision makers to get the most updated objectives if needed.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

2.2.1 Identify the strategic goals & outcomes for the business

Input Output Materials Participants
  • Business strategy
  • Executive stakeholder interviews
  • IT project portfolio
  • Business goals
  • Business context information
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, Infrastructure leads
  • Portfolio manager (PMO director)
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Illustrative example of strategic goals and outcomes for a public health agency

  1. Agency Support
  2. We are committed to maximizing public health service by strengthening health and healthcare infrastructure at the local/state/provincial level.

  3. Enhanced Service Delivery
  4. We will ensure that core functions and essential services are efficient, effective, stakeholder focused, modernized, and future-enabled.

  5. Increase Health Equity
  6. We will create equitable opportunities to advance access to care for all by addressing the social determinants of health.

2.2.2 Map strategic objectives to it programs

1-3 hours

Communicate the business strategy to other levels of the organization visually.

  1. Starting with strategic objectives, map the value streams that will ultimately drive them. Next, link the key capabilities that enable each value stream. Finally, map the IT programs supporting those capabilities. This process will help you prioritize IT programs that deliver the most value to the organization.
  2. Consider:
    1. Focus on the value streams that truly drive the strategic objectives.
    2. Are there any capabilities that are not tied to outcomes?
    3. Are all strategic objectives supported with IT programs?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't be too granular. The audience for a strategy is interested in a higher-level understanding of what IT is doing. As such, keep things at the program level as opposed to the individual projects that programs are composed of.
Input Output
  • List of IT projects, initiatives and IT capabilities
  • Business goals
  • IT initiatives
  • Goals cascade
Materials Participants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Capability maps
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Portfolio manager (PMO director)
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Illustrative example of strategy map

The image contains a screenshot of an illustrative example of strategy map.

Note: Illustrative Example. To edit and customize this visual please download the corresponding Reference Architecture Template tool.

2.2.3 Validate the strategy map & program prioritization

1-3 hours

Crowdsource the strategy map validation.

  1. Validate the strategy map in layers. Start with IT and confirm which IT programs enable particular capabilities. Next, work with the business departments to validate the capabilities that support the value streams. Finally, validate the strategic objectives of the organization with the C-suite and communicate the value streams that support them.
  2. Consider:
    1. Are all strategic objectives equally important? If not, get a prioritized list of strategic objectives.
    2. Do any of the programs have critical dependencies that influence sequencing?
    3. If there are strategic objectives that do not have any IT programs mapped to them, consider adding new programs. Conversely, reconsider upcoming programs that do not have a connection to strategic objectives.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't delay validating the strategic maps with top-level executives. A proactive approach will save you time in terms of rework and maximize alignment.
    2. Don't leave anyone out on the assumption that they won't be interested. It is easy to miss key stakeholders – be careful and organized.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

2.2.3 Validate the strategy map & program prioritization

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • IT initiatives
  • Goals cascade
  • Validated strategy map & goals cascade
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, infrastructure leads
  • Portfolio manager (PMO director)
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Additional Support

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech Workshop.

The image contains a picture of Neal Rosenblatt.

Contact your account representative for more information.
workshops@infotech.com

1-888-670-8889

To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.

Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

The image contains a screenshot of the Model Level 1, 2, 3 business capability maps. The image contains a screenshot of the Review capability assessment map(s).

Model Level 1, 2 & 3 business capability maps.

Using the business capability map as an accelerator, Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to modify and validate the business capability map to suit your organization’s context.

Review capability assessment map(s).

Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to review the various capability assessment maps and identify value opportunities within your organization.

Phase 3

Assess Key Capabilities for Planning Priorities

Phase 1

Phase 2Phase 3Phase 4

1.1 Define the organization’s value stream

1.2 Develop a business capability map

2.1 Define the organization’s key capabilities

2.2 Develop a strategy map

3.1 Business process review

3.2 Information assessment

3.3 Technology opportunity identification

4.1 Consolidate & prioritize capability gaps

This phase will walk you through the following activities:

  • Assess process support for capabilities
  • Evaluate user adoption of processes for key capabilities
  • Prioritize key capabilities process refinement
  • Assess how well information supports capabilities
  • Evaluate accessibility to data for key capabilities
  • Prioritize data improvements for key capabilities
  • Assess technology support of capabilities
  • Uncover value opportunities for applications
  • Compare results with industry research to determine plan of action

This phase involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Step 3.1

Business process review

Activities

3.1.1 Assess process support for capabilities

3.1.2 Evaluate user adoption of processes for key capabilities

3.1.3 Prioritize key capabilities process refinement

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Assess process support for capabilities
  • Evaluate user adoption of processes for key capabilities
  • Prioritize key capabilities process refinement

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Identification of capability process enablement

Business process review

Use process analysis and assessment to drive collaboration and integration.

  • Public health organizations tend to develop in reaction to changes in public policy, government initiatives, and emergency response. This reactive nature can lead to the following pains:
    • Duplicated or conflicting business activities
    • Processes that create bottlenecks by involving too many business units
    • Manual rekeying of data into multiple systems
    • Inefficient process for producing standard reports
  • Public service organizations are driven by the desire to effectively manage programs and existing business processes while recognizing the need for a faster ability to share data, information, and insight across multiple systems and business units to support increasing demands for more rapid response.
  • A primary goal of a strategy is to provide a framework that enables the current business environment to function as seamlessly as possible, allowing for flexibility when processes need to evolve or respond quickly in emergent situations.
  • Through effective strategy design, IT can provide integration across business units by performing an analysis of how well the organizational capabilities are supported by processes. Specifically, IT should analyze and assess processes on the basis of adherence, enforcement, overlap, and on the presence of effective monitoring measures in support of public health core functions and essential services delivery.
The image contains a screenshot of the Process Assessment Legend.

Figure above: Process Assessment Legend

Business process support of key capabilities

The image contains a screenshot of Business process support of key capabilities.

3.1.1 Assess process support for capabilities

1-3 hours

Standardization breeds efficiency.

  1. Begin by assessing whether each key capability has documented processes supporting it. Then evaluate whether the documented processes have been communicated and the extent to which there is process overlap.
  2. Consider:
    1. What processes are documented?
    2. Have the documented processes been communicated to the business users?
    3. Are some of the processes redundant? Has that been done on purpose, or can you optimize them?
    4. Are there key capabilities that lack processes all together?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't waste time. Only evaluate processes that are documented and communicated, and then evaluate them for exclusivity.
    2. Don't do this in a vacuum. Validate that you have captured all existing processes by speaking to other employees.
InputOutput
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Standard operating procedures
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

3.1.2 Evaluate user adoption of processes for key capabilities

1-3 hours

Having processes is one thing, but are they being adhered to?

  1. The next level of analysis involves assessing whether defined processes are being adhered to. Confirm if the organization enforces adherence and that regular monitoring for deviations is occurring.
  2. Consider:
    1. Is there regular monitoring for deviations from the defined process? Is this recorded and acted upon?
    2. Are there certain groups of users that are not following the processes in place? Why?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't think the lack of process adherence is simply the employees' fault. In some cases, the processes might not be well designed or are outdated, thus warranting the need for refinement.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

3.1.2 Evaluate user adoption of processes for key capabilities

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Standard operating procedures
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

3.1.3 Prioritize key capabilities process refinement

1-3 hours

Use process to drive collaboration and integration.

  1. Key capabilities should be well supported by processes. If there are any capabilities that scored Medium or below, prioritize delivering effective process support, improving user adoption, and establishing effective process governance.
  2. Consider:
    1. Is business process management in your mandated area of influence, responsibility, or accountability? If not, consider who you may need to recruit for support from the business side to drive refinements.
    2. Communicate any new processes or changes to existing ones through a variety of mediums. Make it easy for the users/employees to reference them if needed.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't create redundant processes. Ensure there is minimal overlap with existing processes if you are creating a new process.
    2. Don't forget to think about user adoption and governance when creating new processes. This might be more challenging, but it will ultimately ensure long-term success.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

3.1.3 Prioritize key capabilities process refinement

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Standard operating procedures
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Step 3.2

Information assessment

Activities

3.2.1 Assess how well information supports capabilities

3.2.2 Evaluate accessibility to data for key capabilities

3.2.3 Prioritize data improvements for key capabilities

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Assess how well information supports capabilities
  • Evaluate accessibility to data for key capabilities
  • Prioritize data improvements for key capabilities

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Data architect
  • Organizational planning & analysis staff
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Identification of capability data support

The Data, Reporting & Analytics Diagnostic helps identify information gaps

Assessing how well information supports capabilities is nearly impossible to perform without an honest and thorough understanding of end-user sentiment toward data, reporting, and analytics.

Develop data-driven insights to help you decide which business capabilities require new or improved reporting and analytics and opportunities to improve business processes, and by extension enable the capabilities of the business.

The Data, Reporting & Analytics program will help you:

  • Assess data quality & reporting satisfaction at a glance
  • Evaluate data quality across 9 dimensions of quality
  • Evaluate reporting across 10 dimensions of satisfaction
  • Determine which areas are the most critical
  • Determine effectiveness of analytics tools
The image contains a screenshot of the Data Quality Scorecard and the Report Scorecard.

Here are some critical insights to extract from the Data, Reporting & Analytics Diagnosticreport

Begin with understanding the perception of the information in use in your organization to assess the effectiveness of supporting core functions and essential services.

Data and reports that are deemed to be low accuracy, currency or completeness could hamper strategic business capabilities and should be investigated further regarding the effectiveness of supporting key business capabilities.

The image contains a screenshot of the Data, Reporting & Analytics Diagnostic report.

Information assessment

Assess the availability and quality of data in providing information as a business-aligned asset.

  • Information is central to every organization's success and ability to realize its goals. Too often, organizations experience the following pains:
    • Duplicated or conflicting data residing in disparate databases.
    • Inadequate controls or edits on data.
    • Manual rekeying of data into multiple systems.
    • Inability to provide executives with reliable and easily accessible information for decision-making.
    • Inability of business units to assume “ownership” of data.
  • These organizations are driven by the desire to effectively manage existing business processes while recognizing the need for a faster ability to share data, information, and insight across multiple systems and business units to support increasing demands for more rapid response.
  • A primary goal of a strategy is to provide a framework that enables information to be viewed as a critical business asset, across organizational boundaries and accessed as seamlessly as possible.
  • Through effective strategy design, IT can provide integration of data across business units by performing an analysis of how well the organizational capabilities are supported by information. Specifically, IT should analyze and assess data on the basis of quality, integrity, ownership, and on the presence of an effective data governance framework.
The image contains a screenshot of the Information Assessment Legend.

Figure above: Information Assessment Legend

Information support of key capabilities

The image contains a screenshot of the Information Support of key capabilities.

3.2.1 Assess how well information supports capabilities

1-3 hours

Information is a key business asset.

  1. Begin by assessing whether each key capability has data available to support it. Then evaluate the quality and integrity of the data and the extent to which there is clear business unit ownership of the data.
  2. Consider:
    1. What data exists to support the capability?
    2. Does the same data exist in various databases?
    3. What controls exist to ensure quality and integrity?
    4. Are there key capabilities that lack automated information all together?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't waste time. Only evaluate information holdings that are central to the capability.
    2. Don't do this in a vacuum. Validate that you have captured all existing data by collaborating with other IT and business unit employees.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

3.2.1 Assess how well information supports capabilities

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Data dictionary
  • Key reports
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Data architect
  • Organizational planning & analysis staff
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

3.2.2 Evaluate accessibility to data for key capabilities

1-3 hours

Having data is one thing, but is it easily accessible and available in a format suitable for decision-making?

  1. The next level of analysis involves assessing whether data is easily accessible to the main users of the information.
  2. Consider:
    1. Is data well integrated so executives do not have to access more than one source for the information they need? Is there a data warehouse capability to bring together data from disparate databases?
    2. Is there an end-user business intelligence (BI) capability? Are users sufficiently trained in its use?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't think that the lack of information is the fault of any one IT unit or application. In most cases, there is a lack of a comprehensive approach to enterprise and data architecture at the core of the problem.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

3.2.2 Evaluate accessibility to data for key capabilities

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Data dictionary
  • Key reports
  • Listing of key system of records/transactional data source system inventory
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Data architect
  • Organizational planning & analysis staff
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

3.2.3 Prioritize data improvements for key capabilities

1-3 hours

Use data to institute information as an asset.

  1. Key capabilities should be well supported by data. If there are any capabilities that scored Level 2 or below, prioritize establishing an effective data governance framework. Leverage Info-Tech’s blueprint Build a Data Architecture Roadmap for more information.
  2. Consider:
    1. Is data management fully in your mandated area of influence, responsibility, or accountability? If not, consider who you may need to recruit for support from the business side to drive refinements.
    2. Effective data governance will require close collaboration between IT and the data owners on the business side.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't create redundant data. Ensure there is minimal overlap with existing data elements if you are creating a new application or database process.
    2. Don't forget to think about end-user access and reporting tools when creating new data holdings. This might be more challenging, but it will ultimately ensure long-term success.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

3.2.3 Prioritize data improvements for key capabilities

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Standard operating procedures
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Data architect
  • Organizational planning & analysis staff
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Step 3.3

Technology opportunity assessment

Activities

3.3.1 Assess technology support of capabilities

3.3.2 Uncover value opportunities for applications

This step will walk you through the following activities:

  • Assess technology support of capabilities
  • Uncover value opportunities for applications
  • Compare results with industry research to determine plan of action

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, infrastructure leads
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Identification of capability application and technology support

The Application Portfolio Assessment Diagnostic helps identify application gaps

Application portfolio management is nearly impossible to perform without an honest and thorough understanding of end-user sentiment toward IT software.

Develop data-driven insights to help you decide which applications to retire, upgrade, retrain on or maintain, to meet the demands, and by extension enable the capabilities of the business.

The Application Portfolio Assessment program will help you:

  • Assess the health of the application portfolio
  • Understand the business’ perception of the application in use throughout your business
  • Identify and build core IT processes that automate IT-business alignment
  • Create a plan to address alignment gaps impeding business growth
  • Deliver your plan to demonstrate IT value and progress
The image contains a screenshot of the end-user-satisfaction-diagnostic-program.

Here are some critical insights to extract from the Application Portfolio Assessment Report

Begin with understanding the perception of the applications in use in your organization to assess the effectiveness of supporting key business capabilities.

Applications that are deemed as unleveraged, questionable, or contentious should be investigated further regarding the effectiveness of supporting key business capabilities.

The image contains a screenshot from the Application Portfolio Assessment Report.

Technology opportunity assessment

New technologies can create opportunities for business agility and help develop resilience to rapidly developing conditions such as improvements in emergency response capabilities.

  • Business agility is essential for rapid response. However, the application portfolio of many organizations cannot sufficiently support the flexibility and efficiency the business needs because of legacy challenges.
  • Organizations experience application sprawl over time, caused by many factors, that can end up costing more for licenses, operational resources, and maintenance.
  • Organizations are looking for ways to modernize their applications, but they want to develop options without introducing additional risks. Adopting a capability-based approach to assessing applications will enable the IT department to identify opportunities to:
    • Automate tasks through the strategic selection and implementation of applications.
    • Integrate applications that have cross-capability implications.
    • Rationalize the application portfolio.
    • Eliminate redundant or legacy applications that don’t deliver enough value.
  • The market availability for software applications dedicated to supporting a specific capability (or set of capabilities) can serve as an indicator of the presence of legacy challenges. Where there is a lack of application availability, it may be a signal of either custom-developed, ad-hoc, makeshift solutions or of shadow IT.
The image contains a screenshot of the Technology Opportunity Assessment Legend.

3.3.1 Assess technology support of capabilities

1-3 hours

Determine how well key capabilities are supported by applications.

  1. Perform an application rationalization exercise on the key capabilities to determine how well they are being supported by applications. Applications should be assessed based on flexibility, ease of use, and integration.
  2. Consider:
    1. How flexible are the applications?
    2. How well do the applications integrate?
    3. How easy are the applications to learn and use?
    4. Are there overlap, unplanned redundancy, or data quality issues?
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't perform a complete overhaul. Consider continuity in delivering business services before you rip and replace everything.
    2. Don't forget about shadow IT. Ask around to get an accurate understanding of what applications are being used to support business capabilities.
  • Input
  • Output
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Listing of key system of records/transactional system inventory
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
MaterialsParticipants
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, infrastructure leads
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

Application support of key capabilities

The image contains a screenshot of the application support of key capabilities.

3.3.2 Uncover value opportunities for applications

1-3 hours

Make sure the business is leveraging applications wherever it should.

  1. Unsupported key capabilities are areas in which IT can deliver high value for the business. The key capabilities that score None or Low in the technology assessment are the ones that require the most attention.
  2. Consider:
    1. Prioritize which unsupported key capabilities to focus on based on their importance.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't focus on unsupported key capabilities that will require too much investment.
    2. Don't build an application just because you can. Research existing solutions before deciding to build in-house.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

3.3.2 Uncover value opportunities for applications

InputOutputMaterialsParticipants
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Listing of key system of records/transactional system inventory
  • Capability maps
  • Heat mapped capability map
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, infrastructure leads
  • Departmental executive & senior managers

Additional Support

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech Workshop.

The image contains a picture of Neal Rosenblatt.

Contact your account representative for more information.
workshops@infotech.com

1-888-670-8889

To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.

Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

The image contains a screenshot of the Model Level 1, 2, 3 business capability maps.The image contains a screenshot of the Review capability assessment map(s).

Model Level 1, 2 & 3 business capability maps.

Using the business capability map as an accelerator, Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to modify and validate the business capability map to suit your organization’s context.

Review capability assessment map(s).

Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to review the various capability assessment maps and identify value opportunities within your organization.

Phase 4

Adopt Capability-Based Strategy Planning

Phase 1

Phase 2Phase 3Phase 4

1.1 Define the organization’s value stream

1.2 Develop a business capability map

2.1 Define the organization’s key capabilities

2.2 Develop a strategy map

3.1 Business process review

3.2 Information assessment

3.3 Technology opportunity identification

4.1 Consolidate & prioritize capability gaps

This phase will walk you through the following activities:

  • Assess capability gaps via a MoSCoW analysis

This phase involves the following participants:

  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, infrastructure leads
  • Departmental executive & senior managers
  • Portfolio manager (PMO director)

Step 4.1

Consolidate & prioritize capability gaps

Activities

4.1.1 Assess capability gaps via a MoSCoW analysis

This step will guide you through the following activities:

  • Assess capability gaps via a MoSCoW analysis

This step involves the following participants:

  • Enterprise/business architect
  • Project managers & business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, infrastructure leads
  • Departmental executive and senior managers

Outcomes of this step

  • Consolidated and prioritized capability gaps

Consolidate and prioritize capability gaps

  • Direct strategic IT investments based on the collective output of the capability assessments.
  • When combined with a solid understanding of business priorities and IT’s mandate, a capability assessment can be the driving force that informs a unified perspective on the sequencing of an organization’s strategic IT initiatives.
  • Assessments based on how well a capability is supported by people (via organizational analysis), process (via process review), data (via information assessment), and technology (via application, infrastructure, data, and security improvements) will inform the overall health of a capability, or in other words, the size of a capability gap. This information, when contrasted with the concept of a MoSCoW-based effort to value, forms an enhanced decision-making framework that can be used to determine initiative sequencing on a strategic roadmap.
  • If a capability has a large gap (is poorly supported by people, process, data, or technology), it should be considered as high in effort or difficulty to address. When the capability is well aligned with business priorities and the IT mandate, the capability gap should be considered as high value to address.
  • See the figure on the right: IT leaders should focus their efforts on the lower-right quadrant (high value, low effort). In the top-right quadrant (high value, high effort), IT should seek business support to drive the initiative. Capability gaps on the right side of the quadrant overall are good candidates for capability outsourcing.
The image contains a screenshot of the MoSCoW Analysis for business capabilities.

MoSCoW capability gap analysis

The image contains a screenshot of the MoSCoW capability gap analysis.

4.1.1 Assess capability gaps via a MoSCoW analysis

1-3 hours

  1. Gather and synthesize the priorities from the information, people, process, and technology assessments to develop a consolidated view of IT's planning responsibilities.
  2. Consider:
    1. How big is the difference between current needs and the assessment of the factors that support each capability?
    2. Are there any groups of capabilities that have low scores from the assessments? Consider a root-cause analysis to determine what could be impacting multiple capabilities.
  3. Avoid:
    1. Don't forget about healthy capabilities. Enhance the green (low-gap) capabilities once you have resolved the issues with the red and yellow (large-gap) key capabilities.

Download the Public Health Practice Business Reference Architecture Template

1.2.1 Assess capability gaps via a MoSCoW analysis

Input Output Materials Participants
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Capability maps
  • Shortlisted assessment of capability gaps via 2x2 matrix
  • Whiteboard/flip charts
  • Reference Architecture Template
  • Business analysts
  • Business unit leads
  • Business unit research/data scientists
  • CIO
  • CTO
  • Applications, infrastructure leads
  • Departmental executive & senior managers
  • Portfolio manager (PMO director)

MoSCoW analysis for business capabilities

The image contains a screenshot of the MoSCoW capability gap analysis.

Note: Illustrative Example. To edit and customize this visual please download the corresponding Reference Architecture Template tool.

Ranked list of IT implications template

MoSCoW Rank

IT Implication

Value Stream Impacted

Comments/Actions

M

[Implication]

[Value stream]

M

[Implication]

[Value stream]

M

[Implication]

[Value stream]

S

[Implication]

[Value stream]

S

[Implication]

[Value stream]

S

[Implication]

[Value stream]

C

[Implication]

[Value stream]

C

[Implication]

[Value stream]

C

[Implication]

[Value stream]

W

[Implication]

[Value stream]

W

[Implication]

[Value stream]

W

[Implication]

[Value stream]

Address key capability gaps

Reference Architecture

Enterprise Architecture

Document Your Business Architecture

  • EA Strategy
  • Data Models
  • EA Governance

Business Context & IT Strategy

Document Business Goals and Capabilities for Your IT Strategy

  • IT Strategy
  • Digital Strategy
  • IT Budge

Applications Strategy

Review Your Application Strategy

  • Data Quality
  • App Dev Throughput
  • ERP Selection

Infrastructure & Operations Strategy

Build the Business by Building an Infrastructure Roadmap

  • Change Mgmt.
  • Asset Mgmt.
  • Cloud Strategy

As part of your next steps checklist, leverage the reference architecture for priorities that drive measurable top-line organizational outcomes and the unlocking of direct value.

Additional Support

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech Workshop.

The image contains a picture of Neal Rosenblatt.

Contact your account representative for more information.
workshops@infotech.com

1-888-670-8889

To accelerate this project, engage your IT team in an Info-Tech workshop with an Info-Tech analyst team.

Info-Tech analysts will join you and your team at your location or welcome you to Info-Tech’s historic Toronto office to participate in an innovative onsite workshop.

The following are sample activities that will be conducted by Info-Tech analysts with your team:

The image contains a screenshot of the Model Level 1, 2, 3 business capability maps.The image contains a screenshot of the Review capability assessment map(s).

Model Level 1, 2 & 3 business capability maps.

Using the business capability map as an accelerator, Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to modify and validate the business capability map to suit your organization’s context.

Review capability assessment map(s).

Info-Tech analysts will work with relevant stakeholders to review the various capability assessment maps and identify value opportunities within your organization.

Summary of Accomplishment

Problem Solved

  • Accelerated the building of your organization’s capability map by defining the organization’s value stream and validating the industry reference architecture.
  • Used business capabilities to define strategic focus by defining the organization’s key capabilities and developing a prioritized strategy map.
  • Assessed key capabilities for planning priorities through a review of business processes, information, and application and technology support of key capabilities.
  • Consolidated and prioritized capability gaps for incorporation into priorities.

If you would like additional support, have our analysts guide you through other phases as part of an Info-Tech workshop.

Contact your account representative for more information.

workshops@infotech.com

1-888-670-8889

Bibliography

“Community Health Assessment - STLT Gateway.” CDC, 13 Aug. 2018. Accessed 8 Apr. 2019.

Craven, Matt et al. “Preventing Pandemics With Investments in Public Health.” McKinsey, 21 May 2021. Accessed 28 Jan. 2022.

DAMA International. DAMA Guide to the Data Management Body of Knowledge (DAMA-DMBOK Guide). Technics Publications, 2009.

“Data Quality Management What You Need to Know.” SAS Institute, 2022. Accessed 28 Jan. 2022.

“Define the Business Context Needed to Complete Strategic IT Initiatives.” Businesswire, 1 Feb. 2018. Web.

“Definition of Policy | AD for Policy and Strategy.” CDC. 29 May 2015. Web.

“Health IT: Advancing America’s Health Care.” Health IT. Web.

Henry, Jawanna et al. “By LEAPs and Bounds: Newest Round of Awardees Seek to Advance Health Equity and Research.” Health IT Buzz, 11 Aug. 2021. Web.

“Interoperability in Healthcare.” HIMSS, 4 Aug. 2020. Web.

Nation, M. et al. “What Works in Prevention: Principles of Effective Prevention Programs.” American Psychologist, Vol. 58, No. 6-7, 2003. pp. 449–456.

Panagioti, Maria, et al. “Association Between Physician Burnout and Patient Safety, Professionalism, and Patient Satisfaction.” JAMA Internal Medicine, Vol. 178, No. 10, Oct. 2018. pp. 1317–30.

Petters, Jeff. “Data Privacy Guide: Definitions, Explanations and Legislation.” Inside Out Security, 28 Sept. 2020. Accessed 28 Jan. 2022.

Posnack, Steven. “Health Interoperability Outcomes 2030.” Health IT Buzz, 13 May 2021. Web.

“Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Prevention.” Institute for Work & Health, Apr. 2015. Web.

“10 Essential Public Health Services.” CDC, 18 Mar. 2020. Web.

The Business Architecture Guild. BIZBOK® Guide, 2021. Web.

TOGAF Version 9.1. The Open Group, 2 Feb. 2009. Web.

“Top Health and Well-Being Trends for 2022.” Managed Healthcare Executive, 15 Nov. 2021. Accessed 28 Jan. 2022.

Vizer, Lisa M., et al. “‘It’s Not Just Technology, It’s People’: Constructing a Conceptual Model of Shared Health Informatics for Tracking in Chronic Illness Management.” Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol. 21, No. 4, Apr. 2019.

Public Health Solution Architectures

Business, Data, Application, and Technology Architectures for Data and Analytics Modernization

Business Architecture

Defining capabilities

  • Defining capabilities: the activities that define the business of public health practice. They support specific core function value streams.
The image contains a screenshot of the Public Health Business Capability Map, defining capabilities.

Business Architecture

Shared capabilities

  • Shared capabilities: business-aligned capabilities that realize the organization’s defining core functions and essential services.
  • Tier 2 support value stream: connect business goals to the organization’s defining core functions, essential services, and value realization capabilities.

The image contains a screenshot of the Public Health Business Capability Map, shared capabilities.

Business Architecture

Shared capabilities

  • Shared capabilities: business-aligned capabilities that realize the organization’s defining core functions and essential services.

The image contains a screenshot of the Public Health Business Capability Map, shared capabilities.

Business Architecture

Assessment/surveillance

The image contains a screenshot of the Public Health Business Capability Map, assessment/surveillanc.

Data & analytics modernization – data lakehouse

Solution Architecture

Data + Application + Technology Layers

The image contains a screenshot of the solution architecture on the data & analytics modernization - data lakehouse.

Info-Tech Insight

A data lakehouse is a modern, hybrid, open data management architecture that takes the best concepts from both the data science focus of a data lake and the analytics power of a data warehouse and puts them together while trying to eliminate the unsupported and proprietary limitations of both models. A data lakehouse offers one single source of truth for analytics and simplifies enterprise data infrastructure at a time when machine learning is poised to disrupt every industry.

Data Lakehouse Concept

Data Warehouse + Data Lake = Data Lakehouse

Data & analytics modernization – solution architecture

Solution Architecture

Data + Application + Technology Layers

he image contains a screenshot of the solution architecture on the data & analytics modernization - solution architecture.

Info-Tech Insight

A data lakehouse infrastructure provides a modern, architected, single-source platform solution for safe, secure, and governed data ingestion, unified data analytics, and manual, automated, and streaming data sharing and accessibility.

Begin Your Modernization Journey

Example: solution architecture

For illustrative purposes only.

Solution Architecture

Data + Application + Technology Layers

The image contains an example of the solution architecture.

Info-Tech Insight

This solution architecture serves as a high-level example of data, application, and technology layers of an enterprise architecture leveraging Microsoft Azure and Databricks technologies. It provides use-case agnostic descriptions of various system components and how they interact, various environments and how they are related, the roles of users (personas), and the flow of data through the system. Together, these topics provide a starting point for scalable and repeatable use case development with a focus on standardization of basic functionality provided by the platform without being prescriptive to the point of impeding growth or the development of new use cases.

Example: solution architecture

For illustrative purposes only.

Administrator persona

Solution Architecture

Data + Application + Technology Layers

The image contains an example of solution architecture with a focus on administrator persona.

Administrator Persona

Administrators are responsible for setting users up within the platform and ensuring that users have access to computational resources and data. Their tasks include adding and administering users and groups; creating, setting up, and assigning clusters; and setting groups of users up with data permissions based upon roles typically articulated in data use agreements (DUAs).

Example: solution architecture

For illustrative purposes only.

Data engineer persona

Solution Architecture

Data + Application + Technology Layers

The image contains an example of solution architecture with a focus on data engineer persona.

Info-Tech Insight

This solution architecture serves as a high-level example of data, application, and technology layers of an enterprise architecture leveraging Microsoft Azure and Databricks technologies. It provides use-case agnostic descriptions of various system components and how they interact, various environments and how they are related, the roles of users (personas), and the flow of data through the system. Together, these topics provide a starting point for scalable and repeatable use case development with a focus on standardization of basic functionality provided by the platform without being prescriptive to the point of impeding growth or the development of new use cases.

Example: solution architecture

Data analyst persona

For illustrative purposes only.

Solution Architecture

Data + Application + Technology Layers

The image contains an example of solution architecture with a focus on data analyst persona.

Data Analyst Persona

Data analysts are consumers of the datasets that data engineers create to extract insights for their business stakeholders. Analysts are a broad classification of end users and may cover everything from business intelligence analysts to data visualization engineers to advanced data scientists. However, unlike data engineers and data scientists, analysts often need a code-free graphic user interface from which to query data.

Example: solution architecture

Data scientist persona

For illustrative purposes only.

Solution Architecture

Data + Application + Technology Layers

The image contains an example of solution architecture with a focus on data scientist persona.

Data Scientist Persona

Data scientists, within healthcare and government industries, typically represent business stakeholder(s) and programs. Employing multiple coding languages such as R, Python, and SQL, they develop, train, and run queries and algorithms for predictive analytics, machine learning, and data mining applications and create visualizations, dashboards, and reports for business stakeholders. PowerBI and Tableau are popular tools.

Info-Tech Resources

Catalog of Info-Tech Resources for Public Health Practice

  • Business Alignment Program
  • Health Information Management Program
  • Health Information Technology Program

Industry Insights Designed to Help You Lead Digital Transformation

A set of comprehensive tools to enhance IT's ability to align people, programs, and technology with key business capabilities, and priorities in public health practice.

The image contains a screenshot to demostrate industry insights.

Deep Insights Tailored to Your Industry

The image contains a screenshot to demonstrate deep insights tailored to industry.

Info-Tech Resources

Leverage Info-Tech's Business Capabilities Resources

A set of comprehensive tools to enhance IT's ability to align people, processes, programs, and technology with key business capabilities and priorities in public health practice.

Catalog of Info-Tech Resources for Public Health Practice

Business Alignment Program

Administration & Program Management

Diagnostic

CIO Business Vision

A low-effort, high-impact program that will give you detailed report cards on the organization's satisfaction with IT’s core services.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Diagnostic

Data Quality Scorecard

Get a report showing the business’ evaluation of data quality so you can focus your improvement efforts to meet their needs.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Establish Data Governance

Deliver measurable business value. Establish a core strategic planning team toward data governance planning and Roadmapping.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Document Business Goals and Capabilities

Discover gaps in the business context, fill in those gaps, and document your business context specific to our strategic IT initiative.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Build a Business-Aligned IT Strategy

A step-by-step document that walks you through how to properly align with the business, achieve IT excellence, and drive technology innovation.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource
Organizational Design

Diagnostic

IT Staffing Assessment

A comprehensive report that shows you exactly where IT staff time is going and whether it's effectively driving results.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Diagnostic

IT Management and Governance

To start your process improvement journey, get a customized report highlighting your organization’s most pressing IT process needs. Focused results on organizational design.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Redesign Your IT Organizational Structure

Align your organizational structure, roles, and processes to execute on business strategy – the better aligned the organization is, the more effective it is Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Optimize the IT Operating Model

Adapt your IT operating model and respond to a growing number of trends. Enhance how IT adds value for stakeholders of technology services.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Business Alignment Program Resources Cont'd

Budgets & Funding

Catalog of Info-Tech Resources for Public Health Practice

Blueprint

Build an IT Budget

Effective IT budgets are more than a spreadsheet. They tell a story. Help the organization make the right decisions. Make the business your partner to understand their future needs.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Increase Grant Application Success

Enhance your organization's grant writing process. By leveraging Info-Tech’s methodology, your organization will strategically select, write, and submit competitive grant applications.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Outreach & Communication

Blueprint

Manage Stakeholder Relations

Make proper stakeholder management a habit. Manage your stakeholders effectively by discovering who they are, understanding how they may impact you, and determining what you can do about it.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Embed Business Relationship Management in IT

Leverage knowledge of the business to become a trusted strategic IT partner.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Policy Management

Blueprint

Review and Improve Your IT Policy Library

Create policies for the risks that matter most to your organization. Ensure they reflect and address the current regulatory environment.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Health Information Management Program

Data Strategy

Diagnostic

Data Culture

Understand how your organization scores across 10 areas relating to data culture. Coming Soon!

Coming Soon

Diagnostic

The First 100 Days as CDO

Devise a 100-day plan to realize early value and long-term success.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Concierge

Data Strategy Review

Arm yourself with a data strategy that puts your organization data to work for you.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Build a Robust and Comprehensive Data Strategy

Put a strategy in place to ensure data is available, accessible, well integrated, secured, of acceptable quality, and suitably visualized to fuel organization-wide decision making.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Data Management

Blueprint

Create a Data Management Roadmap

Aligning business data strategies with key data management enablers. Streamline your data management program with this simplified framework.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Data Governance

Blueprint

Establish Data Governance

Your organization’s value streams, and their associated business capabilities, require effectively governed data. Ensure your data governance program delivers measurable business value by aligning initiatives with the business.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Improve IT Governance to Drive Business Results

Avoid bureaucracy and achieve alignment with a minimalist approach. Use this four-step process to optimize your IT governance framework.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Health Information Management Program Resources Cont'd

Catalog of Info-Tech Resources for Public Health Practice

Data Quality Management

Blueprint

Build Your Data Quality Program

Understand the importance of data quality, Info-Tech’s methodology for conquering data quality challenges, and how we will support you in completing this mission.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Enterprise Content Management (ECM) Strategy

Blueprint

Develop an Enterprise Content Management Strategy and Roadmap

Optimize searchability and findability of information assets; build a roadmap to a right-sized ECM Strategy to enable your people to spend less time looking form content.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Implement a Content Curator Playbook

Shift enterprise content management from a system to a role. Organize your documents and files to make your content findable.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

ECM Lifecycle Management

Blueprint

Embrace Information Lifecycle Management in Your ECM Program

Manage your organization’s content and documents across their lifecycle with an effective information classification scheme, policies, and governance.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Effectively Use SharePoint as Your ECM Solution

Structure your content for a successful user experience; assure the quality of your information assets from cradle to grave.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Data Integration

Blueprint

Build a Data Integration Strategy

Create a data integration solution that supports the flow of data through the organization that meets the organization’s requirements for data latency, availability, and relevancy.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Master Data Management

Blueprint

Develop a Master Data Management Strategy and Roadmap

Create a master data management strategy that will help your organization develop a central version of the truth, make accurate and complete data available to the applications, people, and processes that need it.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Data Architecture

Blueprint

Build a Data Architecture Roadmap

Create a tactical plan for addressing the drivers of the business. Ensure that data architecture is optimized and aligned with the business.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Modernize Data Architecture for Measurable Business Results

Enable the business to achieve operational excellence and stakeholder engagement with an innovative, agile, and fit-for-purpose data architecture practice.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Create a Customized Big Data Architecture and Implementation Plan

Create a data architecture and implementation plan that can support big data.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Project Portfolio Management Strategy

Diagnostic

Project Portfolio Management Diagnostic Program

The Project Portfolio Management Diagnostic Program is a low effort, high impact program designed to help project owners assess and improve their PPM practices.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Develop a Project Portfolio Management Strategy

Drive IT project throughput by throttling resource capacity.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Health Information Management Program Resources Cont'd

Catalog of Info-Tech Resources for Public Health Practice

Reporting, Analytics & AI

Blueprint

Build a Reporting and Analytics Strategy

Deliver actionable business insights by creating a business-aligned reporting and analytics strategy.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Establish an Analytics Operating Model

Accelerate data-driven decision making. Leverage a secure platform where data can be easily exchanged for insights generation.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Build a Data Pipeline for Reporting and Analytics

Data architecture best practices to prepare data for reporting and analytics. Evolve your data architecture. Avoid endless data projects. Facilitate data self-service.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Get Started with Artificial Intelligence

Understand what AI really means in practice and get started with your AI explorations to harness its transformative power.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Create an Architecture for AI

Build your target state architecture from predefined best-practice building blocks.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Mitigate Machine Bias

trol machine bias to prevent discriminating against your stakeholders and damaging your organization.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Data Platform & Practice

Blueprint

Select Your Data Platform

Data platform selection should be based on common best practices and optimized for your organization’s specific needs and goals and support a future-enabled platform development.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Build an Extensible Data Warehouse Foundation

Establish a well-architected core model with just enough oversight and governance.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Build a Data Warehouse

Business insights come from both structured and unstructured data. Create a plan for enabling new capabilities by extending your current data warehouse environment with emerging technologies.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Blueprint

Design Data-as-a-Service

Start participating in the data marketplace ecosystem by leveraging a Data-as-a-Service (DaaS) framework.

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Health Information Technology Program

Data Platform Modernization

Solution Set

Step 1

Build a Robust and Comprehensive Data Strategy

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Step 2

Develop an Enterprise Content Management Strategy and Roadmap

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

Step 3

Build a Data Architecture Roadmap

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Step 4

Build a Reporting and Analytics Strategy

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Step 5

Build a Data Integration Strategy

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Health Information Technology Program Resources Cont'd

Catalog of Info-Tech Resources for Public Health Practice

Architecture Modernization

Solution Set

STEP 1

Document Your Business Architecture

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STEP 2

Design an Enterprise Architecture Strategy

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STEP 3

Define an Enterprise Architecture Operating Model

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Modernize Infrastructure & Operations

Solution Set

STEP 1

Build the Business by Building an Infrastructure Roadmap

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STEP 2

Define Your Cloud Vision

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STEP 3

Document Your Cloud Strategy

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STEP 4

Jump Start Your Vendor Management Initiative

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STEP 5

End-User Satisfaction Diagnostic

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Infrastructure & Cloud

Solution Set

STEP 1

Modernize Enterprise Storage

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

STEP 2

Modernize the Data Center with Software-Defined Infrastructure

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

STEP 3

Reimagine Operations for a Cloud First World

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

End-User Enablement

Solution Set

STEP 1

Modernize and Transform Your End-User Computing Strategy

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

STEP 2

Build a Digital Workplace Strategy

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Secure the Enterprise

Solution Set

STEP 1

IT Security Diagnostic Program

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STEP 2

Build an Information Security Strategy

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STEP 3

Develop a Security Operations Strategy

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STEP 4

Identify Opportunities to Mature the Security Architecture

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STEP 5

Build a Cloud Security Strategy

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STEP 6

Develop Your Security Outsourcing Strategy

Go to This Info-Tech Resource

About Info-Tech

Info-Tech Research Group is the world’s fastest-growing information technology research and advisory company, proudly serving over 30,000 IT professionals.

We produce unbiased and highly relevant research to help CIOs and IT leaders make strategic, timely, and well-informed decisions. We partner closely with IT teams to provide everything they need, from actionable tools to analyst guidance, ensuring they deliver measurable results for their organizations.

What Is a Blueprint?

A blueprint is designed to be a roadmap, containing a methodology and the tools and templates you need to solve your IT problems.

Each blueprint can be accompanied by a Guided Implementation that provides you access to our world-class analysts to help you get through the project.

Need Extra Help?
Speak With An Analyst

Get the help you need in this 4-phase advisory process. You'll receive 9 touchpoints with our researchers, all included in your membership.

Guided Implementation #1 - Build your organization’s capability map
  • Call #1 - Introduce Info-Tech’s industry reference architecture methodology.

Guided Implementation #2 - Use business capabilities to define strategic focus
  • Call #1 - Define and create value streams.
  • Call #2 - Model Level 1 business capability maps.
  • Call #3 - Map value streams to business capabilities.
  • Call #4 - Model Level 2 business capability maps.

Guided Implementation #3 - Assess key capabilities for planning priorities
  • Call #1 - Create a strategy map.
  • Call #2 - Introduce Info-Tech's capability assessment framework.

Guided Implementation #4 - Adopt capability-based strategy planning
  • Call #1 - Review capability assessment map(s).
  • Call #2 - Discuss & review prioritization of key capability gaps & plan next steps.

Authors

Neal Rosenblatt

Jennifer Jones

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